Tag Archives: New Zealand Historic Places Trust

‘Brocklebank building’, 189-195 King Edward St, South Dunedin

189-195 King Edward St, South Dunedin, owned by the Brocklebank family trust, is listed as item B363 in Schedule 25.1 (Townscape and Heritage Buildings and Structures) of the Dunedin City District Plan. The protection required is the facade to King Edward St.

This is yet another of Dunedin’s historic commercial buildings which, over the years, have suffered from a lack of regular maintenance and repair to maintain structural strength. Thus building safety and performance have been compromised. Despite being tenanted (until recently), the building has been neglected to such an extent the street facade has begun to peel away from the structure behind.

The fact of the building’s listing is reason enough for the resource consent application to be notified by Dunedin City Council. This will give interested parties a chance to comment on the owner’s proposal.

A recent survey of photographic archives suggests the date of build is c.1883, or possibly earlier.

An ideal project for Dunedin Heritage Fund assistance: preserving the facade to King Edward St.

### ODT Online Mon, 16 Jan 2012
Delays frustrate trust
By Mark Price
The owners of the condemned Brocklebank Drycleaners building in the main street of South Dunedin are frustrated at a five-month wait, so far, for approval to knock down the building. In August, the Dunedin City Council demanded the building be emptied of its tenants and fenced off, because the facade was unsafe.
Read more

Related Post:
13.8.11 Building facade failure: “It’s only the facade at the front that can’t be used”

In Marc Price’s Saturday magazine feature on South Dunedin it’s interesting to read that historic heritage is being given prominence in the city council’s ‘urban design’ project…
http://www.odt.co.nz/lifestyle/magazine/194344/south-dunedin-steaming-ahead

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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HNZ National Heritage Preservation Incentive Fund

Updated post Fri, 13 Feb 2015 at 8:09 a.m.
NZHPT is now known as Heritage New Zealand (HNZ)

The NZHPT national heritage preservation incentive fund helps owners with the maintenance of Category 1 registered properties.

### ODT Online Tue, 27 Dec 2011
Restoration funding for historic properties
Oliver’s Restaurant, in Clyde, and Woodside, in Dunedin, have received New Zealand Historic Places Trust funding for restoration work.
Oliver’s received $35,000 from the NZHPT contestable national heritage preservation incentive fund to strengthen and repair the former Naylor’s General Store roof on the property.
Woodside [pictured below], in Lovelock Ave, North Dunedin, received $40,000 to replace wooden joinery and the slate roof.
Read more

New Zealand Historic Places Trust
NZHPT National Heritage Preservation Incentive Fund
NZHPT Registration Summary – Woodside (Category 1)
NZHPT Registration Full Report – Woodside (Category 1)
Francis Petre – architect (Wikipedia)
Francis Petre – architect (Dictionary of New Zealand Biography)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Empire Hotel, 396 Princes St, Dunedin

### ch9.co.nz December 8, 2011 – 6:22pm
Historic Empire
Established as the Queen’s Arms in 1858, the building now known as the Empire Hotel has been nominated as a Category 1 building with the Historic Places Trust. Category 1 is the highest listing a building can achieve, and has benefits especially for aging structures.
Video

NZHPT Nomination for Registration:
EmpireHotel.ashx (PDF, 1.38 MB)

Empire Hotel, 2008. Photo: Elizabeth Kerr

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Barlow Justice Valuers / New Zealand Historic Places Trust—Heritage Interiors Award 2011-2012

Background and purpose
Dunedin’s unique look and feel is, in part, defined by its large number of historic and heritage buildings. Heritage interiors are a very important, but sometimes overlooked, part of Dunedin heritage. Ensuring restorations and adaptations of heritage building interiors respect and re-use existing heritage features and fabric is an important part of ensuring their future survival.

Barlow Justice Valuers and the NZ Historic Places Trust wish to recognise and highlight the achievements of building owners who have undertaken sympathetic restoration and refurbishment to interiors of Dunedin’s older buildings. The Dunedin Heritage Interiors Award recognises successful, and appropriately sympathetic interior restoration or upgrade projects.

The Award is administered by the DCC and may be given annually to building owners or developers who have, in the opinion of the judging panel, undertaken the most innovative and sympathetic heritage building interior upgrade and/or refurbishment project in the city.

General Information
Individuals or organisations may nominate their own or others’ buildings for consideration. Projects should reflect a commitment to the retention and re-use of interior features and building fabric. Eligible projects will have had work completed in the 12-month period to 1 December 2011.

The Award consists of a certificate and a cash prize of $1500,
which is awarded to the property owner. A certificate will also
be awarded to the interior designer/s.

Download Award information here:
Barlow Justice – NZHPT Heritage Interiors Award 2011-2012 (PDF, 493 KB)

Barlow Justice Valuers
New Zealand Historic Places Trust

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Workshop for heritage building owners – 23 November

### ODT Online Sat, 8 Oct 2011
Heritage building workshop planned
By David Loughrey
Communication between Dunedin building owners and the city council is strengthening, as the council works to help owners find ways to re-use the city’s stock of heritage buildings.

The council’s second annual one-day workshop for heritage building owners will be held on November 23. The theme this year is “After Christchurch: What to know about owning an older building”, with the free workshop targeting owners of non-residential buildings.

The first workshop, an initiative of the council’s heritage buildings economic re-use steering group, attracted more than 80 people last November, with numbers bolstered by concerns following the first major Christchurch earthquake. Council heritage policy planner Glen Hazelton said strong interest was expected again.
Read more

7.10.11 DCC Media Release

To register or for more information contact Glen Hazelton 477 4000 or ghazelto@dcc.govt.nz

Workshop Highlights
• Speakers include Jason Ingham, from the University of Auckland and co-author of a report for the Canterbury Earthquakes Royal Commission entitled ‘The Performance of Unreinforced Masonry Buildings (URM) in the 2010/2011 Canterbury Earthquake Swarm’, Alan Race (Crombie Lockwood) on insurance matters, and Lou Robinson (Hadley Robinson) on earthquake strengthening.

• The New Zealand Historic Places Trust and Dunedin City Council will provide presentations, with the DCC outlining its new Earthquake-prone Buildings Policy and the range of incentives available to heritage building owners to assist earthquake strengthening.

• Steve Macknight of Steve Macknight Strengthening and Design and Lawrie Forbes of Zeal Steel, will conduct site visits to earthquake strengthening projects.

Workshop for Heritage Building Owners Information Flyer (PDF, 219.6 KB)

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Historic heritage SAVE

### ODT Online Mon, 3 Oct 2011
Rare win as joint bid saves heritage building
By David Loughrey
Dunedin’s heritage stock has scored a rare win, with a private owner, local government and the New Zealand Historic Places Trust working together to save a historic building. The owner of the Wood Adams building in Bond St, Michelle Kennard, said the structure had been transformed from a home for pigeons and a canvas for graffiti with help from the Dunedin City Council in the form of rates relief and money from the city’s heritage fund. The building was the first to go through the council’s joint consent working group, an initiative that came from the heritage buildings economic reuse steering committee, set up to deal with the deterioration of the city’s heritage stock.
Read more

• Assistance to heritage building owners [DCC Link]

• The Dunedin Heritage Fund is an independent legal entity. The deed of constitution recognises that Dunedin City Council and New Zealand Historic Places Trust jointly administer the fund. Cr Lee Vandervis chairs the governance committee.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Larnach Tomb restoration

Updated post Sun, 8 Feb 2015 at 6:48 p.m.

Larnach's Tomb, Northern Cemetery 3

The Northern Cemetery at Dunedin is registered by Heritage New Zealand as a Category I historic place.

### ODT Online Sat, 17 Sep 2011
An inspired restoration
By Charmian Smith
The most striking memorial in Dunedin’s Northern Cemetery once again soars proudly heavenwards after years of neglect, vandalism and desecration. After seven years in the planning and 18 months’ work, Larnach’s tomb in the Northern Cemetery is looking pristine with restored finials and crosses, new window tracery and stained glass, new doors and wooden floor – all replicas of the originals.

Stewart Harvey, chairman of the Historic Cemeteries Conservation Trust of New Zealand, instigated a conservation report in 2006. By early last year he had raised $345,000, initially with a grant from the Dunedin Heritage Fund. Other sources contributed: the Lottery Grants Board, Heritage and Community Trusts, Southern Trust and Macmillan Trust, and work was able to start.
Read more + Images

• (via ODT) William James Mudie Larnach, banker, businessman, politician, government minister, and builder of the grandiose house, The Camp, now known as Larnach Castle, on Otago Peninsula in the early 1870s, built the mausoleum in 1881 as a memorial to his first wife Eliza Jane Guise.

• Official opening
Dunedin Mayor Dave Cull will officially open the restored tomb today at 1pm.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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180 Rattray St, Dunedin: Proposed historic building demolition means loss of nineteenth century alley

The Exchange area stands to lose the solid Victorian era building constructed of bluestone and brick, with a modern frontage, standing next door to the listed Speight’s Shamrock Building (1912-1913), opposite the listed Crown Hotel (1890). Significantly, the proposed site development at 180 Rattray Street will also destroy one of Dunedin’s outstanding nineteenth century service alleys.

The former P. Hayman & Co. Building (1872) under threat of demolition is located in the district plan listed North Princes Street / Moray Place / Exchange Townscape Precinct (TH03). The building, designed by architect David Ross, is not individually listed for protection in the district plan (Schedule 25.1); nor is it registered by New Zealand Historic Places Trust.

The Dunedin City Council has recently granted demolition consent for the N. & E.S. Paterson Building (date?) and the Barron Building (1875) in Rattray Street.
[ODT link]

180 Rattray Street, Dunedin
Resource consent is sought to demolish the existing building on site; and to use the empty site for stand alone rental car parking.

The resource consent application from Paterson Pitts, on behalf of building owner Lincoln Darling, says: “Although it was built before 1900 and had bluestone foundations and ground floor, the modernisation of the building had destroyed the original facade to the point it no longer had any heritage significance.”

The application acknowledged the site might be an archaeological site in terms of the Historic Places Act and, if so, an authority might be required.

Closing Date for Submissions: Wednesday 21 September 2011 at 5pm.
Read the application at the DCC website.

### ODT Online Thu, 25 Aug 2011
Application to demolish building
By Debbie Porteous
Consent is being sought to demolish the former Furniture Court Building in Rattray St, Dunedin, and use the site as a car park. The resource consent application from Paterson Pitts, on behalf of building owner Lincoln Darling, states Mr Darling had been unable to attract any tenants after Furniture Court moved to another location.
Read more

Rattray Street circa 1900. Hocken Collections [c/n E3856/42]
At far left, P Hayman & Co’s store, 180 Rattray Street

Related Posts:
12.4.11 Public outrage – SHAME on those re$pon$ible for building neglect
19.2.11 Owner of Dragon Café/Barron Building has lodged an application to demolish.
26.1.11 D Scene: Honour heritage
22.1.11 SAVE Dragon Café / Barron Building – Sign the Online Petition
13.1.11 Barron Building and Rattray Street
13.1.11 Banks, Barron & Co Building Collapse pics
Lincoln Darling is the current owner of the Barron Building.

ODT Online:
21.5.11 Downfall of the Dainty Dairy
21.5.11 Land, lots of land
3.5.11 ‘Holes’ spoil townscape – DCC

See comments at (14.4.11) Public consultation for DCC Earthquake-prone Buildings Policy. Lincoln Darling is a former owner of the Dainty Dairy on Stuart Street, another historic commercial building under threat of demolition.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Disappearing heritage #Dunedin

Updated post 29.7.13

### DScene 27-7-11 (page 7)
Too many historic icons being destroyed or neglected
By Owen Graham
OPINION Now that [Carisbrook] is no longer required, its owner – the Dunedin City Council – is looking to offer the site for a suitable redevelopment. As part of the exercise, council is making clear to interested parties that a few of the last remnants of the historic grounds’ past ought to be retained for incorporation into future developments. The Exchange area of Dunedin today offers one of the best opportunities for revitalisation yet it is a very confused place . . . nearby, up High St and Rattray St, there are active attempts to remove all traces of the past, be it through active demolition or neglect by intent.
{Continues} #bookmark

DScene 27.7.11 (page 7) Owen Graham NZHPT

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NZHPT response #eqnz

Discussions on what steps need to be taken to retain heritage landmarks will become clearer once public safety is assured and emergency services have declared the sites safe.

NZHPT offers support in any capacity
NZHPT Information release
24 February 2011

The New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT) will work with Civil Defence, emergency services, the Christchurch City Council and government agencies in any capacity required following the 6.3 magnitude earthquake that struck Christchurch on Tuesday.

“Public safety is the absolute priority,” said NZHPT Chief Executive Bruce Chapman. The greatest tragedy has been the significant loss of life and injuries to many people. With a state of emergency declared we will respond to any request for assistance.”

The scale and extent of multiple building collapses particularly in the city centre was considerable, Mr Chapman said. The NZHPT-managed Timeball Station in Lyttelton had also suffered serious damage.

“Once public safety is assured and emergency services have declared the sites safe NZHPT staff will work with owners and other agencies to assess future options.”

Staff from Wellington and Dunedin are assisting NZHPT’s Christchurch-based staff. NZHPT Link

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Full heritage assessment some time off
NZHPT Information release
25 February 2011

Discussions on what steps need to be taken to retain heritage landmarks will become clearer once public safety is assured and emergency services have declared the sites safe, says the New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT).

NZHPT Chief Executive Bruce Chapman is in Christchurch to support the organisation’s staff and to begin assessment of the damage to Christchurch’s heritage buildings. Once the all-clear had been given to access the central city a more detailed assessment will be able to be made in consultation with the council, structural engineers, owners and government agencies.

“Clearly damage to landmark buildings such as the Provincial Chambers, The Press building, the Arts Centre, the Basilica, and the Anglican church in Cathedral Square are significant. The NZHPT-managed Timeball Station has also suffered serious damage.

“These buildings are much-loved, iconic landmarks that helped to tell Christchurch’s story and have made the city the special place that it is and what locals and visitors readily identify with.

“There is no easy answer to whether Christchurch can rebuild its damaged historic buildings. Once the full extent of damage is known then discussions can begin on how Christchurch can rebuild, what buildings it can retain and the costs involved.

“But that’s a conversation that no one is having right now. Like everyone else our thoughts are firmly on the safety of people in the city, and with the remaining rescue and recovery work.”

Mr Chapman said there were a huge number of buildings needing to be assessed on a case-by-case basis, but the people of Christchurch and the rest of the country were already commenting on the enormous sense of loss felt for the city’s character.

“This seems likely to be a discussion that many people will want to take part in.” NZHPT Link

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### stuff.co.nz Last updated 05:00 01/03/2011
Lives before Christchurch earthquake damaged historic buildings
By Kate Chapman
Historic Places Trust chief executive Bruce Chapman agreed many older buildings may be too dangerous to save. Others were repairable. Engineers were beginning to assess central city buildings from the outside. “The indications at this point are that many of those iconic buildings are indeed repairable, including the cathedral, which is good news but that’s going to take some time and there may actually be some deconstruction required first.”

There was a risk of a rush to demolish old buildings, particularly in residential areas, Mr Chapman said. The Christchurch Heritage Buildings Fund was available to building owners who needed financial assistance to restore their property. “There are some tough calls to be made there and we wouldn’t want to put buildings before people, that’s for sure.”

The current earthquake code applied retrospectively to all buildings, and the heritage buildings with strengthening fared better than some modern buildings, Mr Chapman said. “Where it’s practicable we would really like to see those buildings carry on, particularly the iconic buildings … that history, now, is going to be associated with survival.” But there was also an opportunity to create new history, such as was done with the art deco buildings in Napier after the 1931 quake. Full story

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Historic Timeball Station to be dismantled
NZHPT Information release
4 March 2011

The New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT) confirmed today that the Timeball Station in Lyttelton is to be dismantled. One of 48 properties nationwide cared for by the NZHPT, Timeball Station is a Category I historic place and internationally significant because of its maritime history.

“It is with enormous regret that we must take this step, but public safety is paramount. People around the world have seen images of the extensive damage caused by the quake on 22 February, which has compounded damage sustained in the earthquake on 4 September last year,” said Chief Executive, Bruce Chapman.

“Our decision is based on specialist engineering information and guidance, as any decision about heritage buildings damaged in the quake should be. “The Timeball Station is too damaged and too dangerous for us to consider anything other than dismantling, but this work will pose problems.

“This is an extremely difficult site. It was chosen as a building site over 135 years ago for the Timeball Station because of its elevated position, allowing ships to see it clearly from the harbour. That’s now working against us. The steep site means there’s no way to drive on and the potential to position a crane, below or above it is very limited. We are constrained not only by issues of access, but also by the risk of injury to any personnel who will need to be involved with this work. We are not prepared to put anyone’s life at risk. That said, if we can find a way to dismantle the Timeball Station that allows us to retain as much of the building’s materials as possible, we will do so. This site remains significant and we would hope that in future we can do justice to this important building.”

Plans for the dismantling process are under development and the NZHPT remains hopeful that the Timeball mechanism can be recovered.

“NZHPT is looking at all possible options for the reconstruction of the tower. But it may be some time for that decision to be made.”

Read the full Information release to learn more about the Timeball Station.

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### nzherald.co.nz 10:26 AM Monday Mar 7, 2011
NZPA and NZ Herald Staff
No desire to bulldoze Christchurch – Brownlee
New Zealand Historic Places Trust chief executive Bruce Chapman last week said much of Christchurch’s heritage could be saved. Restoring the city’s history had a role to play in its recovery from the February 22 earthquake, he said.

“In my view most of the most iconic buildings in Christchurch will survive. We think it’s important these buildings are in fact repaired. In future they’ll be important symbols.”

He supported strengthening surviving heritage buildings so they could resist future earthquakes. But he acknowledged there would be some iconic buildings that would have to come down.

“There is a lot of significant heritage – particularly churches – that may not be able to be saved. And that’s going to be a tragedy.” Full story

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Letter from Christchurch 2 #eqnz

UPDATED

Today’s Press has more examples of high-handed action.

The Piko Whole-Foods Co-op store – an important social and architectural landmark – had its top storey removed before the owners knew what was going to happen. The heritage team at Christchurch City Council worked with the owners to try and stop the demolition but the top floor had already gone by the time they got there and its landmark value has been completely destroyed. The building had been earthquake strengthened within the past few years and though it did have some serious damage it is far from clear that it was beyond repair.

It had the misfortune to be sited on a major intersection of the one way system and we all know that free movement of cars must be put ahead of buildings. There was absolutely no question of people being in the building and thorough shoring up should have ensured public safety.

There is some sort of process for group 1 & 2 listed buildings, plus NZHPT registered buildings – a cursory sort of report by the heritage planners (they are so overwhelmed that the reports are completely perfunctory) – and a report from the NZHPT and/or council engineer, but the Civil Defence Controller has the final say.

I am not sure that NZHPT is fighting too hard anyway from what I can gather – because people have been killed (mainly in modern buildings) they seem to have taken the view that they can’t push hard for heritage.

If the owner can be identified (not always easy) they might be given 24 hours notice so have a chance to argue for a delay. If buildings are unlisted and simply make an important contribution to the character of a precinct, no process is required at all. Nothing at all can be done to try and avert demolition.

There seems to have been some agreement made between Civil Defence and the council staff involved with Civil Defence, that no cordons to protect the public from buildings needing repair will be put in place if they would encroach into a road – as long as they take that view not much will be saved.

As a result of tonight’s meeting a delegation of heritage advocates and business people are going to try and meet the Civil Defence Controller tomorrow to urge a slow down, but whether they will even be granted an appointment is far from certain.

We are meeting again on Friday to plan our next steps, especially if the appeal to the Controller fails to have any impact. The scary thing is the Government can just keep on extending the state of emergency.

{Letter received by What if? on Tuesday, 8 March 2011 11.24pm. Names removed to protect identities. -Eds}

(9.00am) What if? learned the group has been granted a meeting today with the Civil Defence Controller.

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Letter from Christchurch – it’s bad

WHAT DO RED STICKERS MEAN NOW?

Just had a long and rather unpleasant shake as I began to write. I am not certain how many demolitions have taken place with independent engineering advice that the buildings are OK. I know of one definite case in Lyttelton and we had a very close call with the Tunnel building. Transit had the diggers in place ready to demolish. A tenant alerted a friend who got on to NZHPT who actually got their engineer onto the case promptly. He said the damage was minor and Transit backed down (probably because they have a memo of understanding with NZHPT).

In the CBD owners have of course been unable to get independent experts in but decisions are being made to demolish simply because buildings have been red-stickered. The red sticker means they are unsafe to enter as it stands – it should not mean automatic demolition. It involves no judgement as to whether the building could be restored if appropriate shoring up took place. At present owners are being given 24 hours notice that a building is going to be demolished with little possibility of influencing the decision and no chance to recover possessions.

I will try to get more details on the process or lack of it at a meeting I am going to tomorrow. We have received calls from a number of distressed owners who have valuable property in buildings which they believe can be restored but who fear that they will lose both building and contents without being able to do anything about it.

The general approach seems to be that any reasonably undamaged buildings in a block are just a nuisance and will slow down the process of clearance – that it is more efficient to clear out everything (this is the view of somebody working hard to prevent listed buildings from being demolished).

Another reason behind the demolition of red-stickered buildings is that the demolition companies apparently get the materials and contents as salvage – so we have been informed by an antique shop owner who defied the red stickers (in a suburban area) in order to recover stock ahead of the demolition crews.

I will try to get more details to you tomorrow, it is clear that there are owners who want to restore their buildings but are simply being told they have to come down and that is that.

{Names removed, letter received by What if? on Tuesday 12.07am. -Eds}

“DEMOLITION CREWS, THEY’RE WORSE THAN THE LOOTERS.”

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The proactive heritage development lobby EXISTS in Dunedin

Some say if we want to get serious about preserving heritage buildings, then maybe we are going to have to rethink how we go about paying for it. Others say if you buy a heritage building, then you should be prepared for what it might cost you and stop complaining. ODT

Allied Press Building. Image ©2011 Elizabeth Kerr

### ODT Online Mon, 21 Feb 2011
Refurbishing a numbers game
By Debbie Porteous
Everyone loves to see a historic building refurbished and in use, but there are inevitable hurdles to such renovation and reuse, especially when they involve buildings less fabled or publicly admired . . . From the point of view of people involved with redeveloping heritage buildings, the major impediment to redevelopment certainly appears to be the costs.
Read more

Other stories:
Two perspectives on the Dunedin heritage buildings – Lois Galer & Robert Clark
South Dunedin highlights heritage
Dunedin chef puts to sea to make ends meet

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Dunedin Heritage: Central government should be contributing

### ODT Online Mon, 21 Feb 2011
Dunedin faces hard choices over what buildings to protect
By Chris Morris
The partial collapse of a 135-year-old commercial building in central Dunedin may be just the wake-up call the city needs, New Zealand Historic Places Trust Otago-Southland area manager Owen Graham says.
Read more

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Image ©2011 Elizabeth Kerr

### ODT Online Mon, 21 Feb 2011
The Donald Reid warehouse: Two options
By Chris Morris
Housing for students or the perfect home for a local government institution? Streets of empty heritage buildings lining central Dunedin’s streets could become a second home for University of Otago students, New Zealand Historic Places Trust Otago-Southland area manager Owen Graham says.

The largely empty warehouses in the area around Vogel St could be adapted for use as a future “population base” for students sick of North Dunedin’s sometimes squalid flats.

Calls for local government institutions in Dunedin to make use of heritage buildings have not been ignored by city leaders, and a building such as the former Donald Reid warehouse could be an option considered if the Otago Regional Council moves from its Stafford St headquarters.

Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Dunedin, are you ‘of a mind’ to protect Historic Heritage?

Today ODT commences a new series about Dunedin’s historic heritage. The series continues on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday next week.

Despite the concerns, the calls for a co-ordinated preservation and adaptive re-use plan have been growing, alongside residents’ anger when they see much-loved buildings tagged for demolition.

### ODT Online Sat, 19 Feb 2011
Dunedin heritage: boom to dust?
By David Loughrey
Dunedin’s stock of heritage buildings is facing a problem more threatening than the ravages of time and weather – a lack of demand. Those charged with finding ways to preserve the city’s acclaimed architecture say this is a major problem.
Read more

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Image ©2011 Elizabeth Kerr

‘Money and taste, rather than historical or cultural significance, frequently determined which industrial sites survived.’

### ODT Online Sat, 19 Feb 2011
Bell tolling for Dunedin’s heritage
By Stu Oldham
Decades of neglect may have saved them but further decades of neglect could see their demise. The bell is tolling for many slowly crumbling warehouses, factories, workshops, and head offices in what used to be Dunedin’s waterfront business and industrial precinct. Historian Alexander Trapeznik, an associate professor at the University of Otago, says the buildings might be part of one of the most significant and under-valued mercantile heritage precincts in New Zealand. Prof Trapeznik says the precinct has been “overlooked” by the uninitiated, in part, because of the sometimes “myopic” view of built heritage that prevails in Dunedin. It was an “unbalanced view” that focused on “the ‘great’ – the great churches, public buildings, grand houses” and ultimately, the great people – rather than on the socially and economically important workplaces that helped finance them.

Read more + Area Map

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Dunedin Heritage Fund

UPDATED

Cr Lee Vandervis, chairman of the heritage fund allocation committee, defended the fund as an increasingly successful incentive to property owners keen to restore city heritage.

### ODT Online Sat, 22 Jan 2011
Councillors support heritage fund allocation
By Stu Oldham
The New Zealand Historic Places Trust (HPT) has been challenged to help the Dunedin City Council beef up a council-administered heritage fund. The council yesterday voted to restore to $80,000 the money it allocates to its Heritage Fund. The pre-draft annual plan had halved it to $40,000.
Read more

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### ODT Online Thu, 20 Jan 2011
Dunedin Heritage Fund may have monies halved
By Stu Oldham
As the Dunedin Heritage Fund seeks to strengthen its position to proactively protect old buildings, the funding it receives from the Dunedin City Council could be halved.
Read more

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Demo by neglect? Save the facade?

Updated.

### ODT Online Thu, 13 Jan 2011
Building’s fate in doubt after parapets collapse
By Chris Morris
The fate of one of central Dunedin’s oldest commercial buildings hangs in the balance after two separate sections collapsed in clouds of crumbling masonry within hours of each other yesterday.
Read more

### ODT Online Thu, 13 Jan 2011
Tears over wrecked ‘second home’
By Chris Morris
A pile of smashed masonry and timber was enough to bring tears to the eyes of Dragon Cafe waitress Lyn Kennedy in Dunedin yesterday. The central city cafe – an institution since opening in 1958 – had become Ms Kennedy’s “second home” since she began work there as a waitress in 1961.
Read more

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12 January 2010. This morning the roof collapsed of the 1875 brick building housing the well-known late night eaterie, Dragon Cafe, at 175 Rattray Street, Dunedin. By the afternoon the facade parapet had also collapsed, destroying the verandah below. What if? awaits council updates on the condition of the central city building.

### radionz.co.nz Updated at 1:48pm on 12 January 2011
Collapse of building in Dunedin
Parts of Rattray Street will be closed for most of Wednesday. Dunedin City Council says power has now been returned to buildings in Rattray Street, except for the one that collapsed.
The council says it advised the owner of the building earlier this week, to have it looked at by an engineer.
Read more

@five15design I was at the Southern Cross at the weekend and noticed the #DragonCafe parapet was looking ominously cracked
(via @JohnAshcroft, 7 hours ago)

### 3news.co.nz Wed, 12 Jan 2011 6:20p.m.
Collapse could force closure of iconic diner
By Annabelle Jackman
Part of a historic building has collapsed in central Dunedin, forcing the evacuation of two hotels and a number of businesses.By midday work had begun to stabilise loose bricks. Hopes rose that the building might be salvageable, but the latest collapse is making the future of one of Dunedin’s oldest commercial buildings far from certain. But the Dragon may be lucky – further engineering assessments will be carried out in the coming weeks and the building’s future decided then.
Read more + Video

### ODT Online Wed, 12 Jan 2011
Roof cave-in closes Dunedin cafe
Dunedin’s Dragon Cafe could be closed for several weeks after parapets above it started collapsing this morning.
Read more

Post and photographs by Elizabeth Kerr

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Dunedin Heritage Fund grants

The Dunedin Heritage Fund is jointly administered by Dunedin City Council and New Zealand Historic Places Trust.

The Dunedin Heritage Fund, with its own deed of constitution, is a separate legal entity to the Dunedin City Council. At no time should the Council claim the Fund as its own.

Previous representatives – in recent times – of the Council and the NZHPT standing on the Dunedin Heritage Fund Committee have made very sure to assert these separations during discussion of applications from the community, and when allocating funds by loan or grant to projects in the community.

Disclaimer. A former Chair of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust Otago Branch, Elizabeth Kerr was a NZHPT representative on the Dunedin Heritage Fund Committee (2000 – 2008).

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Dunedin City Council
Media Release

7 December 2010

Dunedin Heritage Fund Allocated

The September 2010 Dunedin Heritage Fund grants round has been completed. These grants enable the Dunedin City Council to recognise the importance of the city’s heritage to its future.

Grants and loans have been allocated to six groups and organisations for projects including repairs to dry stone walls, conservation plans and restorations of various structural elements.

The recipients were:

Springfield – $18,000
Cargill’s Castle – $11,400
Dunedin Gasworks Museum Trust – $20,000
Corstorphine House – $20,000
Dunedin Prison Charitable Trust – $20,000
1075 George Street – $5,000

TOTAL $94,400

The next funding round closes at 5.00pm on Friday 25 March 2011 and application forms are available from DCC Customer Services Centres.

In another heritage initiative, the DCC’s recent free workshop for heritage building owners, attracted more than 65 people and feedback has so far indicated that attendees found it very useful.

The DCC’s Policy Planner (Heritage), Glen Hazelton, says, “Based on the extremely positive response we had to this first workshop, we will look at running more. We will discuss with those who attended which aspects of the workshop they found most useful and structure the next one accordingly.”

Contact DCC on 477 4000.
DCC page link

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Old Logan Park Art Gallery

A great weekend feature in Otago Daily Times, thanks Kim!

### ODT Online Sat, 4 Dec 2010
‘Fantastic compromise’ saves day
By Kim Dungey
The former Logan Park art gallery is a good example of how heritage significance is not just about pretty buildings, says Jackie Gillies, the architect who has prepared plans for the building’s refurbishment. Few people would use the word pretty to describe the building, a restrained design that was typical of the 1920s and a reaction against the fussy architecture of the late-Victorian era. But Ms Gillies says social and cultural significance are also important.

“In an ideal world, [the former gallery] would not have been reduced in size … But I’m quite excited about how the proximity of the building to the cricket oval will allow some absolutely amazing views through the building straight on to the cricket ground.”
–Jackie Gillies, conservation architect

“A real threat has been hanging over it for a long time … Thank God a few people knuckled down and saved it, and saved it in a way where everyone gets what they want.”
–John Blennerhasset, great-grandson of Percy Sargood

Read more + architectural graphics

### ODT Online Sat, 4 Dec 2010
When the world came to Dunedin
If Dunedin’s leaders today announced they were going to stage an expo over 6.5ha and attract more than 3 million visitors, locals might think they were dreaming. But that’s exactly what happened in 1925 and the former Logan Park art gallery is a reminder. The gallery is the sole surviving building from the 1925-6 New Zealand and South Seas Exhibition, being the only structure built of permanent materials, for insurance reasons.
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### ODT Online Sat, 4 Dec 2010
Sargoods’ gallery gift in memory of Gallipoli sacrifice
By Kim Dungey
The former Logan Park art gallery owes its survival to a wealthy Dunedin couple and events at Gallipoli. It was at Chunuk Bair that 22-year-old Lieutenant Cedric Rolfe Sargood, of the Otago Battalion, went missing in action in August 1915. A little more than a decade later, his parents, Percy and Lucy Sargood, approached the company which had staged the New Zealand and South Seas Exhibition with an offer to buy the exhibition’s art gallery for £4000. They then donated it to the city as a public art gallery in memory of their son.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Dunedin Heritage Re-use Award 2010

Nominations opened last month for the Dunedin Heritage Re-use Award which recognises successful, innovative heritage re-use building projects.

The award is administered by the Dunedin City Council (DCC) and New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT) and is awarded annually to nominated building owners or developers who have, in the opinion of the judging panel, undertaken the most innovative, successful, and sympathetic re-use of an historic building.

Individuals or organisations may nominate buildings for consideration or building owners may enter their own projects. Eligible projects will have had work completed in the 12-month period to 1 November 2010.

The award consists of a certificate and a cash prize of $1500, which is awarded to the property owner and nominations must be in by 7 January 2011.

The competition will be judged by a panel consisting of DCC staff, architects, independent developers and heritage professionals as nominated by the Heritage Buildings Economic Re-use Steering Group. They will assess entries against criteria such as innovation and creativity, sensitivity of adaptation, retention of heritage values, contribution to the urban environment and sustainability.

Dunedin Heritage Re-use Award Nomination Form
(PDF, 400.6 KB, new window)

Further information about how to enter or nominate a building is available from the Dunedin City Council Customer Services Centres, or www.dunedin.govt.nz/heritage

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Supermarket plans… “amicable” agreement reached over Dunedin Gas Museum issues

### ODT Online Tue, 16 Nov 2010
Supermarket closer as parties sign draft
By John Gibb
A proposed Countdown supermarket in South Dunedin has moved closer to reality after parties recently signed a draft consent order, and an Environment Court hearing was called off before its scheduled start yesterday.

Ian Butcher, an architect working for the gasworks, was “very pleased” with the outcome of lengthy negotiations with Progressive and the “very good” way John Sofo, an Auckland architect acting for Progressive, had responded to museum concerns about the south-facing wall.

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Dunedin Heritage Reuse Design Competition

Download poster (PDF): Dunedin Heritage Reuse Design Competition

Further information (PDF): HeritageReuseDesignCompetition UPDATED

DCC Media Release
For the 2010-2011 Design Competition, the nominated building is Garrison Hall, Dowling Street, Dunedin. Entries need to balance creative design, economic viability and sensitivity to heritage features and values.

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DCC Media Release: Dunedin’s Heritage Buildings

Dunedin City Council
Media Release

Dunedin’s Heritage Buildings

Following the Canterbury earthquake, there has been a lot of speculation about the risk to heritage buildings and, in particular, to certain elements of heritage buildings, such as chimneys and parapets.

The DCC and the New Zealand Historic Places Trust are holding a one-day workshop for heritage building owners in November, where earthquake strengthening will be one of a number of topics discussed. Local practitioners will cover a range of ‘getting started’ issues, including earthquake strengthening, fire safety, the role of heritage architects, and principles of conservation repair. The workshop, for heritage building owners, will be free.

The DCC and NZHPT also recommend that concerned owners of heritage buildings contact appropriately qualified structural engineers to assess the property, identify potential risk and investigate solutions for securing items or managing the risk to people and property.

Heritage features can usually be secured and risks mitigated without impacting on the heritage fabric of the building. Ensuring heritage buildings are earthquake-strengthened ensures public safety, and increases the likelihood that Dunedin’s character will be retained following a significant earthquake.

The Dunedin Heritage Fund can provide incentives towards work that will protect and secure heritage features and buildings.

* Earthquake Prone Buildings Policy (PDF, 107.8 kb, new window)
* Heritage Fund Information (opens in new window)

Contact DCC on 477 4000.

Last reviewed: 14 Sep 2010 12:34pm

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DScene choses to profile one building owner, why? Squeaky wheel gets the oil, why?

This week’s headlines hint at a positive “discussion”… but obviously, no changes to the Dunedin City District Plan can be about one building owner. In the meantime, are the ‘co-owners’ of the McIndoe buildings following established best practice in recognising the historic heritage values for their buildings? Are they proposing appropriate uses? Will they draw business away from the city centre? Are they flouting the zoning rules? Who is measuring this? Why should they pay less than others in consent fees? Why is their company a prospect for rates relief? And why is the Council trying to get some runs on the board for “Heritage” before the local body elections? We’re not told.

### DScene 31-3-10
Harbourside and heritage (front page)
It seems time is going to be called on Dunedin’s large scale retail zone – a part of town advocates believe would be the perfect location for the revamp proposed in Dunedin City Council’s controversial Harbourside redevelopment proposal. See p3. #bookmark

Register to read DScene online at http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

Editorial: Time for candidates to speak up (page 2)
It’s put up or shut up time. DScene – and quite a few others besides – have been wondering how many of the current crop of city councillors will be standing again in October, and who will challenge the incumbents.
{continues} #bookmark

Council may drop plan (page 3)
By Wilma McCorkindale
Dunedin City Council seems likely to drop its large-scale retail zone – an initiative which has struggled to revive the area of the city between the wharves and the central city. Advocates are now hoping council can be persuaded to move its controversial proposed rezoning of the harbourside back a few blocks, to redevelop the large-scale retail zone. […] New Zealand Historic Places Trust Otago Southland area manager Owen Graham emphasised the importance of heritage to Dunedin. It had the potential to contribute just as much economically to the city as the building of new developments.
{continues} #bookmark

Building owner’s protest may pay off (page 3)
By Wilma McCorkindale
Last week’s protest by heritage building co-owner Lawrie Forbes may have paid off. Forbes featured in last week’s issue of DScene protesting the restrictions of the large scale retail block where the McIndoe buildings are located – and a potential $37,000 bill for consents and related costs. Forbes was confident after an eleventh hour meeting with Dunedin City Council planners late last week he would obtain a resource consent for existing use, to allow the urban renewal of one of the former John McIndoe buildings on Crawford St.
{continues} #bookmark

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D Scene features heritage/issues!

### D Scene 24-3-10 (front cover)
Car boot sale
A developer has chosen a novel way to make his point over [a] resource consent charge, and is selling his car to meet fees incurred restoring his Crawford St building. See p3. #bookmark

Possible closure strikes a chord (page 2)
By Mike Houahan
Once upon a time, in a galaxy far, far away, I earned a living writing about and reviewing rock ’n’ roll bands. Hence, the news that venerable Dunedin venue Sammy’s is on the brink of closure unless it is rapidly brought up to scratch to meet fire regulations struck a chord… Rock ’n’ roll has almost always been shunted into back-alley venues not fit for purpose, and venues and band managers have often colluded to stuff as many punters in as possible to maximise their revenue.
{continues} #bookmark

Fuming over charges (page 3)
By Wilma McCorkindale
Dunedin City Council may have another zoning battle on its hands, with building co-owner Lawrie Forbes fuming over consent charges for a redevelopment in moribund Crawford St. DCC zoned blocks from Queens Garden to the Oval large-scale retail in 1995, but Forbes believes the zone is not viable and has called for the council to review it.

Forbes said he and partner Craig McNaughton were restoring two of the four buildings on the site at present. Heritage values that had been lost over the century were being restored.

{continues} #bookmark

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The following headline should not imply the building proposal has been granted resource consent. The application has yet to be notified.

Ex-gallery revamp approved (page 5)
By Wilma McCorkindale
One end of the old art gallery building at Logan Park is up for demolition – part of a $5m Dunedin City Council spend up at Logan Park…the last of the buildings which housed the [New Zealand and South Seas International Exhibition (1925-1926)] still in public ownership, is to lose some of its southern end to accommodate an extension to the University Oval sports ground.

‘[Paul]Hudson conceded council intially considered levelling the entire former art gallery as it grappled with the high cost* of the work required to retain it.’

{continues} #bookmark

*That was just ‘historical’ airyfairy bullshit from council on the cost of building retention.

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Bus tourists ‘not welcome’ (page 6)
By Wilma McCorkindale
City hotelier Peter Laing is questioning the city’s attitude towards bus tourists, after he recently paid a parking ticket slapped on a tour bus dropping tourists outside his hotel. Laing said the bus had no option but to park on one of two P5 zones the Dunedin City Council had erected outside the hotel…[he] claimed the new P5s were a remnant of the council’s u-turn on unpopular parking changes it introduced last year.
{continues} #bookmark

Register to read D Scene online at http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

User-pays system a ‘farce’ (page 8)
By Wilma McCorkindale
A Dunedin landlord is peeved at Dunedin City Council’s rules on rating of rental properties, saying its user-pays system was a farce. Darryl Jones was angry over an anomaly he identified between the rating method of his aging block of flats in Stuart St and on studio unit complexes in the city.
{continues} #bookmark

Talk: Dunedin on Dunedin
Your say: Letters to the Editor (page 9)
It didn’t happen overnight, by K Nordal Stene, North East Valley
The shocking state of Sammy’s, which necessitated ats immediate closure, has been a shock as well as a disappointment to many.
{continues} #bookmark

“The Building Act and the Fire Service Act place the obligation on the building owner to operate the building safely.”
-Trevor Tilyard, Dunedin Fire Service

Read the deputy chief fire officer’s full reply.

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The Invisible City (pages 11-12)
By Gavin Bertram
Ancient cities like London, Paris and Rome have layers of history beneath them. These hidden strata tell the story of their habitation by humans, of the rise and fall of empires, and of inexorable progress. Unlike those great metropolises, subterranean Dunedin can’t claim layers going back to Roman times and beyond. But what’s buried under the city is still a source of fascination, and a great window into its history.
{continues} #bookmark #bookmark

Biz: Crunching the numbers (page 20)
Starting it up
Upstart Business Incubator is in the business of getting people into business, but it also has to pay its own way. Mike Houlahan reports.
From its Princes St premises, Upstart has nine companies in “incubation” with five in pre-incubation – a process of readying firms for the full programme of mentoring and business assistance, which becomes available to fledgling entrepreneurs when they graduate to the incubator.
{continues} #bookmark

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