Tag Archives: New Zealand Fire Service

Moron Drivers stay off Otago Southland roads….

….this long Easter Weekend.

[ends]

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The warm fuzzy more genial (guinea pig?!) message:

At Facebook:

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At Facebook:

Fri, 14 Apr 2017
ODT: On the buses over Easter weekend
Heritage buses will be back on the road over Easter weekend, providing public transport over the public holiday. Otago Heritage Bus Society treasurer/secretary Jacqui Hellyer said Dunedinites could ride the buses, which serviced St Kilda, St Clair, the Octagon, Brockville, Halfway Bush and Normanby, for a gold coin donation on Good Friday and Easter Sunday.
The services would run hourly and the timetable would be available on the Otago Heritage Bus Society’s Facebook page, Ms Hellyer said. Passengers could take service dogs or pet dogs on a leash.
The St Kilda service had stayed like its former route – to Brockville then Halfway Bush – and the other services took the routes used on non-public holidays, she said.

The Otago Regional Council, in a statement published on its website, said there would be no bus services on Good Friday or Easter Sunday. However, the standard Saturday timetable would apply on Saturday, and Easter Monday would run on the public holiday timetable. Normal services would resume on Tuesday.

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Cool image at Twitter:

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the NZ public and foreign interest.

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Dunedin’s Logan Park / Signal Hill Fire Dec 2016 ● Cause unknown

Dunedin man Wayne Baird said flames were “a good 30 or 40 metres high…. It’s a good wind blowing right up the valley. It’s all bush and pine so it’s good fuel.” (Stuff)

28.12.16 Stuff.co.nz at 7:47am
Fire crews at the scene of large fire in Dunedin
By Hamish McNeilly
Fire crews are at the scene of a large fire on Wednesday morning to ensure it remains extinguished. The fire threatened a Dunedin high school and several homes. Patrols stayed on Signal Hill through the night, dampening down hot spots after a bush-clad area half the size of a rugby field on the side of Signal Hill was sparked on Tuesday afternoon. […] The fire was contained by 5.45pm on Tuesday and rural fire crews patrolled the area overnight, a Fire Service spokesman said. “I don’t believe it will spread any more and the chances of evacuation have gone down a lot,” he said.
Read more + Photos/Videos

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27.12.16 RNZ News at 8:51 p.m.
Three homes evacuated over Dunedin scrub fire
Three homes have been evacuated as a precaution, as firefighters continue to extinguish a large scrub fire in Dunedin. The scrub fire on Signal Hill near Butts Road broke out at about 2.45pm and was fanned by strong winds. Link + Photos

27.12.16 NZ Herald at 7:19 p.m.
Large fire burning on Signal Hill in Dunedin contained
The fire on Signal Hill in Dunedin has been contained, but about 40 firefighters and three helicopters are continuing to fight the blaze. Earlier tonight three homes in Rimu Street, Ravensbourne, were evacuated as a precaution. The occupants of these homes are likely to return tonight. […] Local residents said the fire 10 years ago was worse. Link + Video

27.12.16 TVNZ 1 News at 5:47 p.m.
Fire on Dunedin’s Signal Hill now contained, cause still unknown
A large scrub fire in Dunedin is now contained, after it began earlier this afternoon. Forty firefighters and four helicopters are at the scene on Signal Hill behind Logan Park High School in North Dunedin. A Fire Service spokesperson says they were called to the fire just before 3pm. They say the blaze is now contained but not extinguished, and they expect to work all night dampening it down. Link + Video

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Otago Daily Times

28.12.16 Hillside ablaze in Dunedin [photos]
28.12.16 Fire crews on watch overnight [story, video and photos]
27.12.16 Ravensbourne evacuees likely to return home [story, videos and photos]

Otago Daily Times Published on Dec 27, 2016
Emergency services attend a large fire at Signal Hill
Emergency services, including three helicopters with monsoon buckets, attend a large fire at Signal Hill.

Otago Daily Times Published on Dec 27, 2016
Fire at Signal Hill
Video: Vaugan Elder

Otago Daily Times Published on Dec 27, 2016
Fire on Signal Hill from Logan Park
Fire on Signal Hill from Logan Park High School.

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TEN YEARS AGO

In late October 2006, bush fires caused extensive damage to forest plantations on the western slopes of Signal Hill. The series of fires forced DCC to close the Signal Hill Reserve indefinitely.

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HISTORICAL

ODT: Opinion: 100 Years Ago (re-published on 9 Oct 2014)
A great fire
Under the influence of the heavy north-west gale which blew yesterday the smouldering fires which are stated to have started on the Leith-Waitati saddle about last Tuesday and travelled to Mount Cargill burst into vivid flames, which spread with great rapidity. The warm winds which have been experienced since Tuesday – at first from the south-west and yesterday from the north-east – have had a drying effect on the grass, and, the fire once fully alight, soon spread in all directions. Yesterday fires were observed on Mount Cargill, on Signal Hill, and on the hill above Logan’s quarry, and vast clouds of smoke drifted from these across the harbour, in places quite blotting out the view. Fortunately the fire above the quarry did not live long, while that at Signal Hill also appeared late in the afternoon to have burnt itself out. On the Leith-Waitati saddle and Mount Cargill, however, a different tale has to be told. Read more

ODT: Opinion: 100 Years Ago (re-published on 11 Oct 2014)
Flames thwarted
Fortunately the flames of the Leith-Mt Cargill-Waitati Saddle fire did not demolish any dwellings, and the actual damage suffered by settlers, apart from the loss of timber, was, as far as could be ascertained, very slight, considering the magnitude of the fire. The loss of timber was the greatest suffered by anyone, and a good deal of valuable wood was destroyed. A few sheds and small huts were also wiped out of existence, and a length of tramway belonging to a sawmiller and an odd haystack was burned. The timber destroyed was the real loss, and it is difficult to estimate its value. However, it must be considerable. […] In a few places telegraph poles were burnt, but no damage was done sufficiently serious to interfere greatly with communication. The most irreparable damage is that to the scenic reserves, which have suffered very badly. A patch of bush at Upper Waitati between the Saddle and Pine Hill, owned by the Dunedin City Council and the Scenic Preservation Commissioners, was attacked, and many acres of it have been ruined.
Read more

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Carroll St house fire #historicheritage

Tyler Christmas Published on Oct 22, 2016
Dunedin Carroll St fire 2016 [full footage]

my heart gose out to them all
out safe and fire is under control
–Tyler

Firefighters could not tell whether the smoke alarms in the flat were working because it was so badly damaged, but the neighbouring flat did have working alarms.

### ODT Online Sun, 23 Oct 2016
Woman jumps from burning flat
By Vaughan Elder
A woman had to jump for her life from the second storey of a Dunedin flat as it became engulfed with flames. Five fire appliances were called to the blaze, which started just before noon on Sunday, and “totally destroyed” the Carroll St flat as about 100 onlookers gathered on the street. Senior Station Officer Justin Wafer, of Dunedin Central, said a woman, had to jump from the second storey as flames engulfed the flat in what he called a “significant structure fire”. A man, believed to be the woman’s partner, was on the ground floor when the blaze started and was among three people who caught her after she jumped. […] Mr Wafer praised the actions of those who caught her as “very brave”.
Read more

Smoke-Alarms-Banner [fire.org.nz]

NEW ZEALAND FIRE SERVICE
We recommend you install long-life photoelectric type smoke alarms in your home. They may cost a little more but the benefits are significant.
• They provide a about 10 years smoke detection.
• They remove the frustration of fixing the ‘flat battery beep’ at inconvenient times such as at 3 in the morning.
• The cost of replacement batteries for standard alarms means the long-life one effectively pays for itself over its lifetime.
• You don’t have to climb ladders every year to replace batteries.

Your best protection is to have photoelectric smoke alarms in every bedroom, living area and hallway in your home. Install them in the middle of the ceiling of each room.

But, at a minimum, you should install one standard long-life photoelectric type alarm in the hallway closest to the bedrooms.

NZFS : Make Your Home and Family Fire Safe Brochure

NZFS : More on smoke alarm installation

Related Post and Comments:
15.5.16 Fire Safety at Home : Install long-life photoelectric alarms #bestprotection

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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Fire Safety at Home : Install long-life photoelectric alarms #bestprotection

Smoke-Alarms-Banner [fire.org.nz]

NEW ZEALAND FIRE SERVICE
We recommend you install long-life photoelectric type smoke alarms in your home. They may cost a little more but the benefits are significant.
• They provide a about 10 years smoke detection.
• They remove the frustration of fixing the ‘flat battery beep’ at inconvenient times such as at 3 in the morning.
• The cost of replacement batteries for standard alarms means the long-life one effectively pays for itself over its lifetime.
• You don’t have to climb ladders every year to replace batteries.

Your best protection is to have photoelectric smoke alarms in every bedroom, living area and hallway in your home. Install them in the middle of the ceiling of each room.

But, at a minimum, you should install one standard long-life photoelectric type alarm in the hallway closest to the bedrooms.

NZFS : Make Your Home and Family Fire Safe Brochure

NZFS : More on smoke alarm installation

Explanation

SMOKE ALARMS : TYPES
There are 2 main types of smoke alarm available – ionisation and photoelectric:

Ionisation alarms
Ionisation alarms monitor ions or electrically charged particles in the air. Smoke particles enter the sensing chamber changing the electrical balance of the air. The alarm will sound when the change in the electrical balance reaches a certain level.

Photoelectric alarms (recommended)
Photoelectric alarms have a sensing chamber which uses a beam of light and a light sensor. Smoke particles entering the chamber change the amount of light that reaches the sensor. The alarm sounds when the smoke density reaches a preset level.

Our recommendation for your home
We recommend that you install photoelectric smoke alarms as they provide more effective all-round detection and alarm in all types of fire scenarios and are more likely to alert occupants in time to escape safely.

█ If your home currently only has ionisation alarms installed we recommend that you also install some photoelectric alarms.

Smoke alarms for hearing-impaired
Smoke alarms are available for people with hearing loss. These alarms have extra features such as extra loud and/or lower pitch alarm sounds, flashing strobe lights, or vibrating devices.
Find out more about these alarms and where you can buy them

Australasian standards for smoke alarms
The Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Authorities Council (AFAC) is the representative body in the Australasian region for fire, emergency services, and land management agencies.
Read the AFAC position on smoke alarms for residential accommodation

WHERE TO BUY : Consumer Test (PDF)
Silent Death : Smoke is toxic – and breathing it can kill. So you need an alarm that gives you early warning and more time to escape.

Fire damaged property - window escape route [stuff.co.nz]Fire damage: 660 Castle St, Dunedin – window escape route [stuff.co.nz]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: fire.org.nz – smoke alarms banner

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Vegetation fire contained at Woodside, Outram

███ Evacuees were advised to go to the Outram Presbyterian Church Hall on Holyhead Street. –Police

Updated post 2.11.14 at 7:18 p.m.

ONE News 2.11.14 Screenshot (1209)

“The New Zealand Fire Service and the Otago Rural Fire Authority have done a great job with protecting … houses today.”

Helicopters with monsoon buckets had been flying overhead all morning and appeared to have contained the fire. By early afternoon it had spread across about 60 hectares of land. Shortly after 2pm, Fire Service spokeswoman Rachel Butler said the blaze was “contained but probably not under control”.
By early evening rain had started to fall, easing conditions.

### stuff.co.nz Last updated 14:52 02/11/2014
Dunedin scrub fire ‘out of control’
By Blair Ensor and Wilma McKay
Land owners evacuated from the scene of an out of control fire west of Dunedin believe the likely cause is re-ignition of a controlled farm burn-off more than a month ago.
Michael and Annette Harrex, who have 2000 acres at Woodside in the hills above near Outram, spent this morning at an evacuation point near the blaze, watching nervously as it threatened their neighbours’ homes.
“We were burning five or six weeks ago and we’ve had a lot of rain in between,” Michael Harrex said. “There was no thought anything could happen. Probably with the high wind overnight, it’s just blown an ember into gorse.”
Harrex said the fire was spreading into trees behind neighbours’ homes.
“It’s obviously extremely stressful for everyone. There are people up there that have obviously had to get out of their houses. it’s just the concern of what might happen.”
Read more + Video

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### tvnz..co.nz updated 11:35
Published: 8:49AM Sunday November 02, 2014
Gorse fire continues to rage out of control in rural Dunedin
Source: ONE News
An out of control gorse fire continues to threaten several homes in the rural area of Outram near Dunedin. The fire, which is currently covering 60 hectares of land in the Maungatua Ranges, is being fanned by strong winds and has come within 20 metres of one farm house.
Fire fighters have been battling the blaze all morning and have sent in five helicopters as they have been unable to reach it on the ground.
Principal Rural Fire Officer Stephanie Rotarangi says they have the front closest to the houses under control but are still working on the rest of the fire.
Read more + Video

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### ODT Online Sun, 2 Nov 2014
Strong winds fan Otago fires
Firefighters have several battles in their hands in Otago this morning as strong winds fan vegetation fires near Outram and Ettrick.
Emergency services continue to fight a massive vegetation fire near Outram, about 30km from Dunedin, which has caused three homes to be evacuated.
Police said the fire was burning strongly along the ridge of the Maungatua hill range and was being fanned by strong wind gusts.
Read more + Photos/Video

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Stadium roof saga continues: no fireworks since lasers are “the next generation beyond fireworks”

### ODT Online Sat, 3 Jul 2010
Video: Stadium roof material fire test
By David Loughrey
Housed as it is on the Otago harbour waterfront, the Forsyth Barr Stadium’s roof may seem threatened more by winds, flurries of snow and the odd hail storm than by the ravages of fire. But the safety of the ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) covering in the event of a fire has continued to exercise the minds of the project’s opponents.
Read more + Video

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### ODT Online Sat, 3 Jul 2010
Stadium passes fire safety inspection
By David Loughrey
The Forsyth Barr Stadium has been given a pass mark and building consent for its fire safety. Dunedin City Council chief building control officer Neil McLeod said a peer-reviewed fire design for the stadium had been completed as part of between 40 and 50 building consents issued so far for the stadium.
Read more

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DScene alerts commercial building owners to responsibilities

### DScene 7-4-10

Fire drill(front page)
The Fire Service is putting a dampener on Dunedin developers converting old commercial buildings to accommodation, saying they need to pass muster before people can live in them. One inner city dwelling has already been shut down. See p3.

Fire service begins blitz (page 3)
By Wilma McCorkindale
The New Zealand Fire Service is embarking on a blitz of Dunedin buildings, fearing hiking numbers of aging industrial and office blocks being illegally let as flats. The city’s deputy fire chief Trevor Tilyard said the fire service had already advised Dunedin City Council building control to shut down illegal flats in Skinners Building on the corner of Jetty and Crawford streets.
{continues}

Register to read D Scene online at http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

New outlook (page 4)
Ravensbourne’s Harbour View Hotel has a new owner who is banking on the Forsyth Barr Stadium to give his investment a new lease of life. Publican Alastair McGaw who took possession in February has already given the pub, built around 1920, a new name, Stadium Lodge and Backpackers.
{continues}

Filming unit set to expand (page 5)
Dunedin based production house NHNZ has plans to expand its global presence and set up a production office in the Middle East. NHNZ already has offices in Washington DC, Singapore and Beijing and is increasingly active in Australia and South Africa.
{continues}

Resource consent given (page 5)
By Wilma McCorkindale
Heritage building owner Lawrie Forbes has achieved a resource consent under existing user rights for his urban renewal of the former Rogan McIndoe buildings.
{continues}

Talk: Dunedin on Dunedin (page 7)
Your say: Letters to the editor
Parking ticket debate by Kevin Thompson, Development Services Manager, Dunedin City Council

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