Tag Archives: Mixed use

Diesoline – supreme winner of the inaugural Dunedin Heritage Re-use Awards

This Dunedin heritage building was almost ‘Man Alone’, as others of its ilk fell to the sword. Now, thanks to its renovation, it’s good to go for some years yet.

Images: Graham Warman

### architecturenow.co.nz Posted 8 Sep 2011
Source: Interior – Sep 2011 (issue: 1)
Sympathetic renovation of Dunedin heritage building
By Michael Barrett
Dunedinites Luke Johnston and Tania Vorrath didn’t let inexperience in the field of heritage building upgrades deter them from taking on this project. The building in question, a late 1800s double-storey brick building, was looking a like a sole survivor in its neighbourhood, 50m back from the Octagon, that was giving way to carparks and modern mid-rise buildings. As an explanation for the building’s survival, Johnston explains that the “building’s significance is in its relative insignificance — it has remained defiantly original”.

Johnston’s idea was to turn this once-unloved building into a contemporary space with character aspects that the public could enjoy. Central Melbourne, with its lanes and lively spaces, was a reference point. The development brief was to revitalise the interior and exterior, providing accommodation for mixed modern uses — Vorrath’s Diesoline Espresso at street level and the boutique office spaces of Johnston’s advertising agency, BrandAid, above.
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Diesoline Espresso, 7 Bath Street, Dunedin
ODT Online 11.3.11 Heritage building use celebrated

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Has DCC Planning lost the plot AGAIN?

### ODT Online Wed, 13 Jul 2011
Call to reject retail development
By Chris Morris
Plans for a multimillion-dollar Green Island retail development should be rejected to help protect Dunedin’s main street experience from a “death by a thousand cuts”, a Dunedin City Council planner says. Irmo Properties Ltd has applied for resource consent to refurbish the rundown Iron Roller Mills Building on Irmo St, Green Island, turning it into a new 4900sq m retail complex with 187 car parks.
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Comment by Barch67 at ODT Online:
If the developer were to re-name it “The Rugby World Cup Retail Development”, it’d be consented by now.
Link

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St Clair esplanade, Dunedin

### ODT Online Thu, 31 Mar 2011
Developer sells share in hotel
By Simon Hartley
St Clair developer Stephen Chittock and Calder Stewart Property – who together built 26-room boutique St Clair Beach Resort, valued at $14 million – have parted company, with Mr Chittock retaining no stake in the award-winning hotel.

In October 2006, the area was rezoned from residential 1 to local activity 2, allowing commercial activity for small-scale businesses, retail shops, apartments and restaurants to be built as of right, without public notification. The Dunedin City Council spent more than $6 million rebuilding the Esplanade seawall and redeveloping the landscaping in 2004.

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restorm: Will Wiles attempts to deconstruct the legacy of “Saint Jane” Jacobs

Thanks to Storm Cunningham, Washington DC @restorm for the link.

Some crusty issues from this one commentator, Will Wiles, bursting and engaging with levels, biases, contradictions, established takes, whatever, in the considered effort to wake us up.

Apart from the fact that cities (as opposed to country towns like Dunedin?) are ‘live wild animals’, it does no harm to consider the urban environment as a dense web or series of interconnected (metaphorical) ‘rooms’, forming the diverse aggregation of human activity.

Various posts at What if? tangle with diversity, infrastructure, mixed use and spatial ideas, fully knowing the machine that drives formation of a spatial plan at DCC will be very far – frighteningly distant – from approaching contemporary urban theory and practice, including the practical weighty mass of real commerce and ethics.

The non application or watering down of ‘local’ discussion and full-blooded, full-bodied debate will be the risk to Dunedin and the region’s future, premised on a GIS mapping exercise that most probably will work like a parking diagram.

And we know what happened to city parking recently… Political decisions made at Council without adequate understanding of interconnectedness, at the business end of people dynamics. Just wait until this non thinking applies to the city as a whole. It’s coming. Start building your stealth bombers.

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### urbanophile.com 1 March 2011
Saint Jane by Will Wiles

Jacobs appealed to me because it chimed with what I saw in cities and what I liked about them – and the Nurbanists have no idea what this quality is. Their agenda for “neighbourhoods”, “contextuality”, “walkability”, is fundamentally anti-urban. These qualities aren’t necessarily bad in themselves – but combined in pursuit of the singular Nurbanist vision, they mean the vivisection of the city into un-urban cells.

The Pelican edition of Death and Life, with cover by Germano Facetti:

Wiles begins…
A spectre is haunting urbanism – the spectre of Jane Jacobs. The American-Canadian writer and activist died in 2006, but she continues to exert influence over the urban debate, primarily via that dreary federacy of messianic dovecote enthusiasts, the “New Urbanists”, who have taken her up as a kind of guiding prophet. Outside the ranks of the Kunstlers and Kriers, there is a great swath of architects, thinkers and writers on the city who have read Jacobs and hold her in high regard. With a touch of embarrassment, I should include myself in this latter category. Not being an architect, I was an auto-didact in urban theory. When I came across a Pelican edition of Jacobs’ best-known book, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, in a second-hand bookshop almost a decade ago, I had never heard of her. But I loved the Germano Facetti cover design, the back sounded interesting enough, and the price was right, so I took it home.

At that point, my reading on urban theory had been scattershot, based entirely in what I found in 2nd-hand bookshops: Corbu, Lewis Mumford, Thomas Sharp, Steen Eiler Rasmussen, an odd band who had given me all sorts of interesting ideas and imagery, but nothing very coherent. What they had in common, more or less, was that I didn’t really enjoy reading them all that much, and had mostly got through to the end in a spirit of patient self-improvement. I picked up Jacobs, expecting more of the same, and instead ploughed through it in a matter of days. If nothing else, she taught me that book-length urban theory could be hugely entertaining.
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-Will Wiles is a writer and Deputy Editor of Icon, a monthly architecture and design magazine.

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‘Light urbanism’ – planners influencing residential design

USA’s Builder magazine picks their 10 Residential Design Trends for 2011, which include smaller houses, green building, a farm-to-table influence in the kitchen, and a walkable, village feel.

### builderonline.com December 16, 2010
10 Design Trends for 2011
By Jenny Sullivan
[excerpt] “Village Vibe. The suburbs are starting to feel more like little cities as planners and developers find ways to weave density and walkability into existing hot spots. “Fewer large-scale development opportunities have shifted the emphasis to smaller infill projects,” AIA chief economist Kermit Baker wrote in a recent design trends report. But these new nodes of “light urbanism” aren’t replacing existing subdivisions; they are popping up between them and connecting the dots. Prime targets for infill redevelopment include big box parking lots, dead shopping centers, strip malls, and transit stations. “People who want an urban lifestyle but either do not want to live in a ‘big city’ or cannot afford to will look to live in the many suburban town centres that have been emerging,” Urban Land Institute senior resident fellow John McIlwain wrote in a recent white paper.”
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Discovering the simple laws of cities

Whenever a city doubles in size, every measure of economic activity, from construction spending to the amount of bank deposits, increases by approximately 15 percent per capita. It doesn’t matter how big the city is; the law remains the same.

West admits that all successful cities are a little uncomfortable. He describes the purpose of urban planning as finding a way to minimize our distress while maximizing our interactions.

Cities are unruly places, largely immune to the desires of politicians and planners. “Think about how powerless a mayor is,” West says. “They can’t tell people where to live or what to do or who to talk to. Cities can’t be managed, and that’s what keeps them so vibrant. They’re just these insane masses of people, bumping into each other and maybe sharing an idea or two. It’s the freedom of the city that keeps it alive.”

### nytimes.com 17 December 2010
A Physicist Solves the City
By Jonah Lehrer
Geoffrey West is a theoretical physicist in search of fundamental laws, he likes to compare his work to that of Kepler, Galileo and Newton. …although West worked for decades as a physicist at Stanford University and Los Alamos National Laboratory, he started thinking about leaving the field after the financing for the Texas superconducting supercollider was cancelled by Congress in 1993. West, however, wasn’t ready to retire, and so he began searching for subjects that needed his skill set. Eventually he settled on cities: the urban jungle looked chaotic — all those taxi horns and traffic jams — but perhaps it might be found to obey a short list of universal rules.

“We spend all this time thinking about cities in terms of their local details, their restaurants and museums and weather,” West says. “I had this hunch that there was something more, that every city was also shaped by a set of hidden laws.”

And so West set out to solve the City.

West saw the metropolis as a sprawling organism, defined by its infrastructure. (The boulevard was like a blood vessel, the back alley a capillary.) This implied that the real purpose of cities, and the reason cities keep on growing, is their ability to create massive economies of scale, just as big animals do.

After analysing the first sets of city data — the physicists began with infrastructure and consumption statistics — they concluded that cities looked a lot like elephants. In city after city, the indicators of urban “metabolism”, like the number of gas stations or the total surface area of roads, showed that when a city doubles in size, it requires an increase in resources of only 85 percent. This straightforward observation has some surprising implications. It suggests, for instance, that modern cities are the real centres of sustainability.
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DScene: Carisbrook opportunity for light industrial park

### D Scene 30.06.10
Kicked into touch (page 1)
Grassroots rugby fear their voices might not be heard as plans to redevelop Carisbrook – the home of the game in Dunedin for more than a century – are laid out. See p3. #bookmark

Register to read D Scene online at http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

Supporters feel left out (page 3)
By Wilma McCorkindale
Otago rugby supporters are miffed they appear to have been shunned in discussions over the future of Carisbrook. The Otago Rugby Supporters Club and the Southern Rugby Club are anxious about their own futures after a stakeholders’ meeting held at the historic Dunedin ground on Monday night.
{continues} #bookmark

Chin defended the lack of invitation to the Southern Rugby Club, and said organisers did not have a brief of ideas that would be proposed at the meeting.

Light industrial park proposed (page 5)
Carisbrook should be developed into a light industrial park, Farra Engineering chief executive John Whitaker told a Carisbrook stakeholders meeting on Monday night. Whitaker said land on the Taieri that had been put aside by the Dunedin City Council for industrial use was too remote from markets, suppliers and networks.
{continues} #bookmark

The trust believed the property would be most suited as a light industrial park within which the heritage structures and some of the field would be retained.
-Owen Graham, New Zealand Historic Places Trust

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Tourism campaign ‘disappointing’ (page 3)
By Wilma McCorkindale
A campaign supposed to turn Dunedinites into local tourists has disappointed the Dunedin City Council (DCC).
{continues} #bookmark

“It didn’t have the success Toursim Dunedin were hoping for. A flop would be a harsh way to describe it – but not the success we thought, yeah”
-John Bezett, DCC economic development

Biz: Crunching the numbers
Room for one more (pages 13-14)
Bunnings believes there are plenty of home handymen and gardeners to go around, as the hardware chain prepares to challenge its competitors head on in South Dunedin. Mike Houlahan reports.
{continues} #bookmark #bookmark

The 12,500 square metre shop – believed to be the fourth-largest Bunnings Warehouse in the country – is now scheduled to hold its grand opening on July 7.

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