Tag Archives: Managers

DCC Annual Report 2013-14

IMG_20141029_132653ODT 29.10.14 (page 5)

http://www.odt.co.nz/news/dunedin/321565/460k-departing-council-staff

Report – Council – 30/10/14 (PDF, 2.5 MB)
Approval and Adoption of Annual Report

Recommendation: That the Council approves and adopts the Dunedin City Council Annual Report for the year ending 30 June 2014, subject to any minor editing required between adoption and final publication.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Clarke and Dawe: ‘We’re getting a lot of changes coming through….’

ClarkeAndDawe Published on Aug 6, 2014

Clarke and Dawe – An Exciting New Interpretation of The Text.
“An Important Government Functionary. One of many.” Originally aired on ABC TV: 07/08/2014

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ClarkeAndDawe Published on Aug 13, 2014

Clarke and Dawe – The Exceptions that Prove the Rules
“Mr Desmond Gruntled, Financial Projectionist” Originally aired on ABC TV: 14/08/2014

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ClarkeAndDawe Published on Aug 20, 2014

Clarke and Dawe – Who said that?
“Mr Tim Astraya, Asparagus farmer” Originally aired on ABC TV: 21/08/2014

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ClarkeAndDawe Published on Aug 27, 2014

Clarke and Dawe – Some Slight Difficulties in the Workplace
“An Extremely Senior Australian Treasury Official” Originally aired on ABC TV: 28/08/2014

http://www.mrjohnclarke.com
http://www.twitter.com/mrjohnclarke
http://www.facebook.com/ClarkeAndDawe

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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DVML: No harassment policy or complaints procedure II

Received from Bev Butler
Mon 21 Jul 2014 at 11:44 p.m.

Message: Just received the attached letter from Terry Davies, dated 17 July 2014.
There are still NO sexual harassment or complaints policies in place at DVML in spite of my letter to ODT at the end of last year alerting Sir John Hansen.
Sexual harassment has allegedly taken place, complaints were made against a senior manager of DVML and no action taken.
Why did Sir John Hansen not take this issue seriously enough to put these policies in place to protect the DVML staff?
[ends]

DVML Sexual harrassment and complaints policies (PDF, 458 KB)

Terry Davies letter 17.7.14 DVML sexual harassment and complaints policies

Related Post and Comments:
20.12.13 DVML: No harassment policy or complaints procedure, really?

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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DVML: No harassment policy or complaints procedure, really?

Supplied.
ODT 20.12.13 Letter to the editor (page 14)
ODT 20.12.13 Letter to the editor Bev Butler p14

ODT Letter to editor Bev Butler 20.12.13 (page 14)
█ [Scanned file missing from media library since before 20.1.14. Replaced 21.7.14. -Eds]

We recommend people read the information below and follow the weblinks.
Take action if you are experiencing bullying/harassment/sexual harassment at your workplace.
Verbal bullying in the workplace is recognised as violence.
Physical bullying is more obviously violence. Dry humping women is……

It is strongly recommended that affected persons take action.
DVML really needs to be an EEO employer.

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From the Equal Employment Opportunities (EEO) Trust website:

Harassment and bullying in the workplace
Workplace harassment and bullying is likely to affect staff morale, creativity and productivity, and create an unhealthy workplace culture. It can be subtle or overt, sporadic or sustained.

Harassment can be defined as any unwelcome comment, conduct or gesture that is insulting, intimidating, humiliating, malicious, degrading or offensive. It might be repeated or an isolated incident but it is so significant that it adversely affects someone’s performance, contribution or work environment. It can include physical, degrading or threatening behaviour, abuse of power, isolation, discrimination, sexual and/or racial harassment. Harassment is behaviour that is unwanted by the recipient even if the recipient does not tell the harasser that the behaviour is unwanted.

Bullying is ongoing unreasonable behaviour which is often intended to humiliate or undermine the recipient but is not specifically unlawful.

Download this document (PDF, 47 KB) >>

Read more at http://www.eeotrust.org.nz/toolkits/harassment.cfm

Headings include:
• Legislation and liability
• Effects of harassment and bullying
• Background: your current climate
• Steps to take
• For further support, advice and training
• Additionally, Bullying Resources

The Equal Employment Opportunities (EEO) Trust is a not-for-profit organisation tasked with providing EEO information and tools to employers and raising awareness of diversity issues in New Zealand workplaces.
The EEO Trust assists employers in introducing and managing proven EEO thinking and practices, encourages diversity by promoting the recruitment and development of people on the basis of merit and generates awareness of the business benefits and rewards of an inclusive workplace.
Based in Auckland, the EEO Trust works with employers around New Zealand providing the latest resources, ideas and information to support workplaces to achieve success through effectively managing diversity. The EEO Trust is resourced by fees from member organisations and Government contributions. It is governed by a Board of Trustees.

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NZ Human Rights Commission – Accessible HTML Document
Sexual harassment

What is sexual harassment?
Sexual harassment is unwelcome or offensive sexual behaviour that is repeated or significant enough to have a harmful effect on you.

The Human Rights Act makes this unlawful when it occurs in:
● employment
● education
● or any other areas covered by the Human Rights Act.

For more information, contact the Human Rights Commission’s toll free InfoLine on 0800 496 877.

More information at:
http://www.hrc.co.nz/hrc_new/hrc/cms/files/documents/22-Mar-2010_12-42-50_Sexual_Harassment_ENGLISH.html

Headings include:
• Examples of sexual harassment
• Victimisation
• Why you should act
• Why sexual harassment is wrong
• What you can do about sexual harassment

If this doesn’t work, or is inappropriate, you can seek advice and assistance from:
• a sexual harassment contact person at work
• a manager or school counsellor
• the Human Rights Commission
• your union delegate or a lawyer
• a professional disciplinary group
• the police
• Employment Relations (if you have been harassed at work). Phone 0800 20 90 20.

Contact the Human Rights Commission

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Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment (MoBIE)
Labour Information (knowledgebase)

Sexual harassment in the workplace
What is the best way to deal with sexual harassment in the workplace?

Employers can help protect their workplace against sexual harassment by implementing an effective sexual harassment prevention programme and ensuring that staff are aware of the organisation’s policy and procedures relating to sexual harassment.

Sexual harassment may include:
An employer or employer’s representative making a request, directly or indirectly, of an employee for sexual intercourse, sexual contact, or other form of sexual activity that contains:
● an implied or overt promise of preferential treatment in that employee’s employment, or
● an implied or overt threat of detrimental treatment in that employee’s employment, or
● an implied or overt threat about the employee’s present or future employment status

An employer or employer’s representative using language (written or spoken), visual material or physical behaviour of a sexual nature:
● that is unwelcome or offensive to that employee (whether or not this is conveyed to the employer or representative), and
● that is either repeated or is so significant that it has a detrimental effect on the employee’s employment, job performance, or job satisfaction

If an employee believes they are being sexually harassed in the workplace, either by another employee or a customer, they need to raise it with their employer. They may decide to discuss the problem with the employer, either directly or through a representative such as a union representative.

If a sexual harassment complaint cannot be resolved through discussion with the employer, then mediation could be an option. Mediation is a service that is available to employers and employees to assist in the resolution of employment relations problems.

Alternatively, an employee may make a complaint to the Human Rights Commission. The Commission can offer dispute resolution services, which may include mediation. More information can be found on their website or by phoning 0800 496 877.

Read this information and other links at:
http://www.dol.govt.nz/workplace/knowledgebase/item/1355

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Take a look at HowTo Law’s website (NZ):
How to bring a sexual harassment claim against your employer

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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