Tag Archives: Lovelock Avenue

Lovelock Avenue Realignment

Rumours have been circulating in Opoho recently that tender documents for the realignment had been sent out by council staff in a hurried attempt to prevent the incoming council from stopping the realignment.

### ODT Online Sat, 16 Oct 2010
Don’t sign any tender papers, Harland told
By David Loughrey
The controversial project to realign Lovelock Ave, in Dunedin, may be dumped, just days before tender documents are due to be signed. Mayor-elect Dave Cull said yesterday he had already told council chief executive Jim Harland not to sign any tender documents for the project. Those documents were sent to selected contractors about three weeks ago, and are due back on Monday.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Construction, Design, Economics, Politics, Project management, Urban design

D Scene – “hoping the stadium roof provides good shelter for the city”

### D Scene 27-1-10 (page 2)
Looking into stadiums – for research
By Mike Houlahan, editor
As you read this, I will be in Melbourne checking out roofed stadiums.
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Ratepayers may bear cost (page 4)
By Michelle Sutton
Dunedin’s ratepayers in future years have been eyed up to shoulder a larger chunk of city costs. At last Thursday’s Dunedin City Council meeting, depreciation costs for water and waste was suggested to be deferred in order to reduce rates in 2010-11. Cr Noone was wary of the impact deferring 100 per cent depreciation would have on future years, and young ratepayers.
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Rates plan under fire (page 4)
By Wilma McCorkindale
Head of one of Dunedin’s foremost charitable organisations, Gillian Bremner, believes Dunedin City Council should have considered the impact of the recession sooner. D Scene asked Bremner, chief executive of Presbyterian Support Otago, for her views on the affordability of a rates rise for Dunedinites.
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Support there Brown says (page 5)
By Wilma McCorkindale
A Dunedin City councillor who this week called for a report into deferring three large developments says supporters are stopping him in the street. Syd Brown called for the report from council managers into the implications of deferring developments at the Dunedin Town Hall, the Otago Settlers Museum, and the Regent Theatre to reduce this year’s rate hike.
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Talk: Dunedin on Dunedin (page 11)
Your say: Letters to the editor

Stadium veil of secrecy
By Peter Attwooll, Dunedin
CST / DVML Chief Executive, David Davies, refuses to show D Scene stadium construction drawings with stand dimensions and rows. (D Scene 20.1.10) Yet they hotly dispute Dr Rob Hamlin’s figures showing a scaled-down stadium, given his sighting of the latest plans, at the Stadium Open Day a number of weeks ago.
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Annual Plan
By KJ Hale, St Kilda
In regards to the financial problems that our mayor and his councillors are presently trying hard to address. It is becoming quite obvious that what the majority of ratepayers including business people and academics predicted is now a reality.
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Lovelock Avenue
By Calvin Oaten, Pine Hill
Cr Michael Guest, at the council budget forum made the surprising comment that there were “still at least 600 residents in the Opoho area strongly opposed to the plan to remove Lovelock Avenue from the Gardens precinct”.
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Details: The finer points (pages 12-13)
Sports academy sets bar high
In a quiet corner of Logan Park, some of New Zealand’s top athletes and coaches are honing their skills. Mike Houlahan tours the South Island Academy of Sport.
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Game: Beyond the scoreboard (page 20)
Hoping for a good 2010 team
By Mike Houlahan
The Highlanders have to learn from their mistakes if they are to be a force in this year’s Super 14, flanker Alando Soakai says.
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Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Architecture, Construction, Design, Economics, Politics, Project management, Sport, Stadiums

D Scene – Kerbside collections, coastal erosion, Lovelock Avenue

### D Scene 16-12-09

Cost of bins set to be included (page 2)
By Wilma McCorkindale
New kerbside collection companies will include the cost of new recycling bins in contracts if the Dunedin City Council gets its way. The council’s preference is that the contractor owns the bins.
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Council discussing multiple tenders (page 2)
By Wilma McCorkindale
Multiple tenders for Dunedin’s kerbside collection have been discussed by the Dunedin City Council. More than one tender could be let under the council’s new kerbside collections scheme approved on Monday.
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Sand erosion exposing history (page 13)
By Wilma McCorkindale
Erosion of sand was steadily uncovering dozens of archaeological sites from Moeraki in the north to sites as far south as the mouth of the Clutha River. People who stole from sites were possibly unaware they were breaking the Antiquities Act.
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Talk: Dunedin on Dunedin
Your say: Letters to the editor (page 14)
Battle over Lovelock Avenue
Letters by Islay Little (Dunedin), Gavin MacDonald (St Kilda)

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Further to the item in D Scene about coastal erosion uncovering archaeological sites and artifacts, the following information is found at the New Zealand Historic Places Trust website.

www.historic.org.nz

Maori Heritage
Nga Taonga Tuku Iho no Nga Tupuna

Maori heritage can be described as nga taonga tuku iho no nga tupuna = treasures handed down by our ancestors.
It comprises a wide range of different places and items from the physical and tangible to the natural environment and the intangible. For the purposes of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust’s responsibilities, cultural heritage excludes te reo, performing arts, most portable taonga, radio waves, etc.
Maori heritage can be divided into the physical/tangible, natural and intangible. More

Legal Protection of Archaeological Sites
The Historic Places Act 1993 makes it unlawful for any person to destroy, damage or modify the whole or any part of an archaeological site without the prior authority of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust. This is the case regardless of whether the land on which the site is located is designated, or the activity is permitted under the District or Regional Plan or a resource or building consent has been granted, the Act also provides for substantial penalties for unauthorised destruction, damage or modification.
Archaeological sites are an irreplaceable part of our heritage and although our history is short, it is rich, varied and unique, and belongs to all New Zealanders. What we discover from archaeological sites helps us to better understand our past and to learn from it. The NZHPT takes compliance seriously, and the Historic Places Act has strong provisions for non-compliance. More

Answers to commonly asked questions are provided in this brochure (pdf 285kb). If you have other questions please call the Regional Archaeologist in the NZHPT office nearest you.

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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DCC in firing line

Again, what is public consultation – it’s not a desktop exercise…

### ODT Online Tue, 28 Jul 2009
Editorial: Losing the plot

Seldom has the Dunedin City Council been under such sustained opprobrium as at present. Every move seems to bring a torrent of criticism. While the fiercest and most bitter attacks have come through opposition to the Forsyth Barr Stadium, a series of other matters have also raised ire, protest or disquiet.
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