Tag Archives: London

rough sheds, sydney london

Tinshed by Raffaello Rosselli
Amy Frearson | 21 June 2013 ● Dezeen
Australian architect Raffaello Rosselli has repurposed a corroding tin shed in Sydney to create a small office and studio apartment. Rather than replace the crumbling structure, Raffaello Rosselli chose to retain the rusty corrugated cladding of the two-storey building so that from the outside it looks mostly unchanged. The project embraces that it will continue to change with time through rust, decay and repair.

“The humble tin shed is an iconic Australian structure,” he explains. “As the only remaining shed in the area it is a unique reminder of the suburb’s industrial past.”

The architect began by taking the building apart and replacing its old skeleton with a modern timber frame. He then reattached the cladding over three facades, allowing room for three new windows. The frames of the windows are made from sheets of Corten steel that display the same orange tones as the retained facade.

“The materials have been left raw and honest, in the spirit of its industrial economy,” adds Rosselli. In contrast with the exterior, the inside of the building has a clean finish with white walls and plywood floors in both the ground-floor living space and the first-floor office.
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*Photography by Mark Syke, apart from where otherwise indicated.

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Collage House, London

Dezeen Published on Feb 13, 2017
Movie explores Jonathan Tuckey’s home in a 19th-century workshop 14 years on
Filmmaker Tapio Snellman has documented the ageing process of architect Jonathan Tuckey’s home, 14 years after he overhauled a 19th-century London workshop to create it. The architect, who is the founder of London-based firm Jonathan Tuckey Design, renovated and extended the steel fabricator’s workshop in 2002 to create a unique home for his family and their dog. He left the bare brick walls tarnished with black marks and chose “simple and everyday” materials to rejuvenate the character of the building, but also because they would weather well. Snellman, who shot Collage House in 2016, captures the ageing of these materials – including nicks and scratches on a series metal fixture and doors by splitting the screen into four – a trick he repeats throughout his film. “The split-screen sequences talk about the occupants and about the way architecture is integrated seamlessly with family life and personal expression,” Snellman told Dezeen. “The four simultaneous views create one strong spatial impression without any single image dominating the effect,” he told Dezeen. Both moving and fixed larch plywood panels clad the exterior, while beach plywood sheeting used as a floor lining inside the house, along with a concrete covering. Douglas fir stud work was planed and left exposed to partition spaces. This enables zones of activity to be defined, while also maintaining openness throughout.

Movie explores Jonathan Tuckey’s home in a former London steel workshop
Eleanor Gibson | 13 February 2017 ● Dezeen
This photography taken by James Brittain when the project completed in the early 2000s shows how Tuckey overhauled the industrial building by partially demolishing walls to create a central courtyard. “Plywood has weathered beautifully on both the interior and exterior and the scuff marks of 15 years use now tell the personal story of the family,” Tuckey told Dezeen. “The concrete floors have patinated and subsequently become more beautiful,” he continued. “The exposed brick was already there but continued to age gracefully as it was used to hang pictures and the kids used it to draw on it.” A space that forms a central part of Snellman’s film is the open-plan kitchen-cum-dining room, which occupies the former workshop. Here, he captures diagonal patterns of light that floods in through the long skylight between the original wooden bowstring beams restored by Tuckey. Snellman contrasts colour footage with black and white in the film, as well as tracking members of the family through the house. “The very controlled track shots try to eliminate the viewers awareness of the presence of the camera, as if the space would be seen at its most intimate, when no-one is present,” the filmmaker told Dezeen.

Ground floor plan [click to enlarge]

First floor plan

When renovating the building, Tuckey’s aim was to maintain as many of the building’s existing features as possible, while also creating plenty of playful spaces that catered to his then-young children. He divided the long and narrow building, which widens at the southern end, into three parts. He also demolished one of the existing buildings to create a courtyard and a small pond. The entrance hall and living area occupy the northern end with a mezzanine above, while the kitchen-cum-dining room occupies the central space. A walkway links these spaces to the two-storey structure added to the southern side, which houses the bedrooms and a bathroom. Since the original renovation, Tuckey has reconfigured the arrangement of the bedrooms, as his now teenage daughters needed more space. The children’s bedrooms have moved upstairs from the downstairs, while the single room used by the parents was divided into two interconnected rooms. A pair of hatches in the bedrooms open to the rooftop terrance, which was also only recently completed by the designer.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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Ella Henderson, s(i)(u)mmering at Palm Springs CA #diversion

THIS VOICE IS JUST TWENTY YEARS OLD

KygoOfficialVEVO Published on Sep 29, 2015
Kygo – Here for You ft. Ella Henderson
Official video for ‘Here for You’ by Kygo feat. Ella Henderson.
Director: Michael Maxxis
Shot on location in Palm Springs CA

Here for You | metrolyrics.com
Songwriters: Gorvell-Dahll, Kyrre

We’ll be passing by
And they’ll be wasting time
Just waiting for new
And while they’re chasing darks
We’ll be dancing in the dusk
‘Cause we’re coming through
Whenever you need me I’m behind
And I promise to take you off to the heights

When you feel you’ve had enough, and you wasted all your love
I’ll be here for you, here for you
When the dog is at his bone, and you run away from home
I’ll be here for you, here for you

Well I’m here for you, I’m here for you, you, you
I’m here for you, yeah, I’m here for you, you, you

And while they’re on the ground
We’ll be looking down
‘Cause we found the truth
And the fire in our hearts
Will be blowing up the stars
Now we’re coming through
Whenever you’re feeling down inside
I promise to take you off to the height

Oh yeah, I’m here for you
And when you feel you’ve had enough, and you’ve wasted all your love
I’ll be here for you

Well I’m here for you, I’m here for you, you, you
I’m here for you, yeah, I’m here for you, you, you

Published by Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Ella Henderson [popoloynow.com] 1

Wikipedia: Ella Henderson
Gabriella Michelle “Ella” Henderson (born 12 January 1996) is a British singer and songwriter. She was a contestant in the ninth series of The X Factor in 2012 and got into the final 12 finishing in sixth place, despite being a strong favourite to win. She was subsequently signed to Syco Music. Henderson’s first single, “Ghost”, co-written with Ryan Tedder, was released on 8 June 2014 and gave Henderson her first UK Singles Chart Number 1 while remaining in the top five of the chart for eight consecutive weeks. It has subsequently been certified platinum for sales in the United States, United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand. Henderson has released three subsequent singles, “Glow”, “Yours” and “Mirror Man”. Her debut album Chapter One was released on 13 October 2014 and peaked at Number 1 on the UK Albums Chart, achieving UK platinum certification on 16 January 2015. Henderson has also featured on Norwegian record producer and DJ Kygo’s song “Here for You”. It was released on 4 September 2015. She lives in south London.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Norman Foster: SkyCycling utopia above London railways #ThinkBig

Or how to put DCC and NZTA to shame for their dangerous, low-design segregated cycle lane solution at Dunners. See the latest DCC / NZTA report, Summary of Cycle Safety Options Made Public, at Comments.

Foster SkyCycling utopia above London railways [dezeen.com]Foster SkyCycle [click to enlarge]

So Big Norm’s a cyclist, and when he gets a wee bit of work in New York City from time to time he likes to travel The High Line [Wikipedia]. But then. He had a gazumping thought about London congestion.

Foster is the only architect on Britain’s rich list.

### dezeen.com 2 January 2014
Norman Foster promotes “cycling utopia” above London’s railways
News: British architect Norman Foster has unveiled a concept to build a network of elevated pathways above London’s railways to create safe car-free cycling routes, following 14 cyclist deaths on the city’s streets in 2013.
Entitled SkyCycle, the proposal by architects Foster + Partners, landscape architects Exterior Architecture and transport consultant Space Syntax is for a “cycling utopia” of approximately 220 kilometres of dedicated cycle lanes, following the routes of existing train lines.
Over 200 entrance points would be dotted across the UK capital to provide access to ten different cycle paths. Each route would accommodate up to 12,000 cyclists per hour and could improve journey times across the city by up to half an hour.
“SkyCycle is a lateral approach to finding space in a congested city,” said Foster, who is both a regular cyclist and the president of Britain’s National Byway Trust. “By using the corridors above the suburban railways, we could create a world-class network of safe, car free cycle routes that are ideally located for commuters.”
If approved, the routes could be in place within 20 years, offering relief to a transport network that is already at capacity and will need to contend with 12 percent population growth over the next decade.
“To improve the quality of life for all in London and to encourage a new generation of cyclists, we have to make it safe. However, the greatest barrier to segregating cars and cyclists is the physical constraint of London’s streets, where space is already at a premium.”
According to the designers, construction of elevated decks would be considerably cheaper than building new roads and tunnels.
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### dezeen.com 28 November 2013
Sandwichbike flat-pack wooden bicycle by PedalFactory goes into production
A flat-pack wooden bicycle that can be assembled in less than an hour has gone into production. PedalFactory claims the Sandwichbike can be unpacked and put together in just 45 minutes. The single-speed bike is constructed from 19 parts that are packaged and delivered in a box along with the tools required to assemble it. The Sandwichbike was launched in Amsterdam on Sunday 1 December 2013. This innovative wooden bicycle is now being shipped.
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Sandwichbike delivery box by Pedal Factory [dezeen.com]Sandwichbike by Pedal Factory [dezeen.com]“If you can make a sandwich, you can make a Sandwichbike.”

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images via dezeen.com

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Art in public places: The Fourth Plinth

Rooster-AAP 1‘Hahn/Cock’ surveys London’s Trafalgar Square [AAP]

### 3news.co.nz Fri, 26 Jul 2013 2:53p.m.
Giant blue rooster ruffles London feathers
By Jill Lawless
This might ruffle a few feathers. A giant blue rooster has been unveiled next to the sombre military monuments in London’s Trafalgar Square. German artist Katharina Fritsch’s 4.7 metre ultramarine bird, titled ‘Hahn/Cock’, is intended as a playful counterpoint to the statues of martial heroes in the square. Both ultramarine blue and the rooster are symbols of France, whose defeat by Britain at the battle of Trafalgar in 1805 gave the square its name.
“It’s a nice humorous side-effect to have something French in a place that celebrates victory over Napoleon,” Fritsch told The Guardian newspaper. Fritsch also said she hoped the double meaning in the work’s name would appeal to the British sense of humour. “I know they like to play games with language,” she said.
London Mayor Boris Johnson said it would be a “talking point for Londoners and tourists alike.” It is the latest in a series of artworks to adorn the square’s vacant “Fourth Plinth”.
One of London’s main tourist attractions, the square was named for Horatio Nelson’s victory over the French and Spanish fleets. A statue of the one-armed admiral stands atop Nelson’s Column at the centre of the square, and statues of other 19th-century military leaders are nearby.
The fourth plinth was erected in 1841 for an equestrian statue that was never completed. It remained empty for a century and a half, and since 1999 has been occupied by artworks erected for 18 months at a time. Previous works have included a giant ship in a bottle and 2,400 members of the public who stood atop the plinth for an hour at a time. AP
3News Link

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15.7.13 Art in public places: Dunedin worms and wyrms #snakesinthegrass
3.1.12 Art in public places #Dunedin

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Panoramas of lost London — 1870 to the end of WW2

Tweet (47 minutes ago):

@Londonist Old panoramas of London recreated today http://t.co/etfYlAjJ


A dirty St Paul’s Cathedral in 1942 (top), when the blitz was damaging its surroundings. A much cleaner St Paul’s today (bottom).

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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After 2012 Olympics, the legacy is…

### architectsjournal.co.uk 27 January, 2010
Olympics site to become huge parkland post Games
By Merlin Fulcher
The 2012 Olympic site will become a public park when the games finish, according to plans unveiled this week. The scheme by landscape architects Hargreaves Associates will turn 101 ha of former industrial land into the UK’s largest new urban park since the early twentieth century.

Avenues of trees and hedges will be used to provide a ‘welcoming entrance’ to the area, and more than 4,000 semi-mature British-grown trees will be planted across the Olympic Park and Olympic Village.
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Related posts:
12.11.09 Zaha Hadid: ‘Gateway into the Games’ London 2012 Olympics
25.3.09 London 2012 Stadium legacy plan

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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