Tag Archives: Legacy planning

Vancouver – how to bankroll ‘civic responsibility’ in the built environment

### thetyee.ca 25 June 2010
Vancouver’s Architectural Revival
Behind the shiny surfaces there is a public logic guided by City Hall policies.
By Adele Weder, TheTyee.ca

[Editor’s note: This is excerpted from A Guidebook to Contemporary Architecture in Vancouver, just published by Douglas and McIntyre. A second excerpt on Vancouver as ‘supermodel,’ by Matthew Soules, runs next week.]

On Aug. 7, 1971, officers on horseback charged into a crowd in Gastown, the original downtown core of Vancouver, and swung their batons at the thousand people who had gathered or wandered there to protest marijuana laws and the nefarious police tactics used to enforce them. At the intersection of Abbott and Cordova, marchers and onlookers were beaten or hauled into paddywagons and the public gathering soon transformed into what became known as the Gastown Riot, one of the most notorious brawls in the city’s history. In the years that followed, the neighbourhood withered, its zoning geared towards the tawdry tourist outlets that would long dominate it, its days as a gathering site all but over.

Making architecture is, at its core, a political action. Implicit in the design approach is the decision to encourage or thwart public gatherings, nurture or displace the poor, ignite or asphyxiate street life, rabble-rouse or calm the streets for paying visitors. At first glance, the shiny newness of central Vancouver suggests a manifesto of clarity and order, a divergence from the fiery social consciousness of decades past. (To sample that sensation, comb through the photo essay of buildings accompanying this essay.)

Underlying these images of finesse and resolve, however, are backstories of complex negotiations between public and private interests whose endgame is the greater public good. With increased density allowance as the currency, the resulting deals have spawned an unprecedented array of community centres, daycares, parks, public art and social housing.

Gastown’s current robust and widely inclusive revival owes much to City Hall — the very institution that had sanctioned the police bullying and subsequent neighbourhood stagnation in the first place.
Read more + Images + Blog Comments

Adele Weder is a Vancouver-based architectural writer and curator, and co-author of the Guidebook to Contemporary Architecture in Vancouver.

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

/via RT @BusbyPW Vancouver”s Architectural Revival @TheTyee http://thetyee.ca/Books/2010/06/25/VancouversArchitecturalRevival/

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Whatever happened to the Bird’s Nest?

Some call the $450-million ‘Bird’s Nest’, built for the Olympics, a white elephant. Over the winter, management hoped to generate revenue with a snow park, but attendance has been sparse.

### latimes.com February 15, 2010
Beijing’s National Stadium is on thin ice
By Lily Kuo – Beijing
Beijing is hosting its own version of the Winter Olympics. Inside the architectural wonder of the capital’s National Stadium, children on rubber doughnuts race on the snow. Teenagers and adults slide slowly down a low ski slope. In the background, a band plays ’90s Chinese rock on a stage flanked by fake snow peaks.

The snow park is the latest effort to create a new life for the stadium, known as the Bird’s Nest.

The “Happy Snow and Ice Season” will run all winter at the stadium where Chinese directors staged a stunning opening ceremony for the 2008 Summer Olympic Games and Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt set world records. Now slushy mounds of machine-made snow and a single ski slope occupy the grounds.

The Bird’s Nest is expensive. Tickets to the snow park are $26. Then visitors use a swipe card to rack up charges for rentals, games and food. They pay at the end.

“I don’t know how much we’ve paid today. It could be as much as my month’s salary,” said Ma Tianjun.

Ma, who drove an hour to get to the park, said he realised too late how expensive it would be. “Once you board the thieves’ ship, you can only go forward,” he said, using an old Beijing saying.

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Related posts:
1.3.09 But, real stadium architecture… + Bird’s Nest Video (1of5)
2.3.09 Bird’s Nest videos continued

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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After 2012 Olympics, the legacy is…

### architectsjournal.co.uk 27 January, 2010
Olympics site to become huge parkland post Games
By Merlin Fulcher
The 2012 Olympic site will become a public park when the games finish, according to plans unveiled this week. The scheme by landscape architects Hargreaves Associates will turn 101 ha of former industrial land into the UK’s largest new urban park since the early twentieth century.

Avenues of trees and hedges will be used to provide a ‘welcoming entrance’ to the area, and more than 4,000 semi-mature British-grown trees will be planted across the Olympic Park and Olympic Village.
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Related posts:
12.11.09 Zaha Hadid: ‘Gateway into the Games’ London 2012 Olympics
25.3.09 London 2012 Stadium legacy plan

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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More rash spending for 2011 RWC

UPDATED

### scoop.co.nz Thursday, 18 June 2009, 5:22 pm
Media Release
City Vision-Labour Councillors – Auckland City Council
For Immediate Release
Thursday 18 June 2009

C&R Afflicted With “Rugby World Cup-itis”

At today’s Auckland City Council meeting, the Citizens and Ratepayers (C&R) councillors voted for an $84.5 million dollar project on Queen’s Wharf which will host the public space activities for the Rugby World Cup 2011 (RWC 2011) described as ‘Party Central’ by the Prime Minister.
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### TVNZ News Published: 4:30PM Thursday June 18, 2009
Wharf development to cost ratepayers $84m
Source: Newstalk ZB/ONE News

Auckland City ratepayers will have to come up with $84 million to redevelop Queens Wharf. After lengthy debate on Thursday afternoon, councillors approved a plan that will include strengthening the wharf and turning two empty sheds into cruise liner terminals in time for the 2011 Rugby World Cup.
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### TVNZ News Published: 12:56PM Thursday June 11, 2009
Queens Wharf to be RWC ‘party central’
Source: ONE News

Auckland’s Queens Wharf will be used as ‘party central’ during the Rugby World Cup and could end up with a new cruise ship passenger terminal.
Read more
Video Link (2:50)

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### ODT Online Fri, 19 Jun 2009
Funding dispute over Auckland waterfront plan

The day after Auckland City Council voted on a $84 million plan to revamp Queen’s Wharf for the 2011 Rugby World Cup a dispute is brewing over how it will be funded. Any decision about funding will have to be signed off by an board charged with overseeing Auckland’s transition to a single “super city”. NZPA
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### ODT Online Fri, 19 Jun 2009
ARC not keen on plans for Queen’s Wharf

Auckland Regional Council (ARC) chairman Mike Lee does not like the $84 million plan Auckland City Council voted on to revamp Queen’s Wharf for the 2011 Rugby World Cup. Mr Lee told Radio New Zealand that he visited the [wharf] sheds today and was under-whelmed.
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### Radio New Zealand National Friday, 19 June 2009 7:12 AM
Morning Report with Geoff Robinson and Sean Plunket
Uncertain future for Queens Wharf development

Joining Morning Report is Auckland City mayor John Banks.
Audio Link (Duration 3′54″)

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London 2012 Stadium legacy plan

### SI.com Updated: Tuesday February 10, 2009 4:19PM
London 2012 team unveils post-Olympics stadium vision
STRATFORD, England (AP) – The main stadium for the 2012 London Olympics will be used after the games to house a secondary school and stage annual track meets.

The 80,000-capacity stadium will be scaled back to a 25,000-seat venue after the games. Besides the school for about 500 students, it will also house the National Skills Academy for sports and leisure industries and the English Institute of Sport.

The London Development Agency said revenue from the rest of east London’s Olympic Park would subsidise the stadium.

“If you take the stadium as a single standalone project it will not break even or make money, it will require level of public subsidy.”
-Tom Russell, chief of LDA’s Olympic Legacy Directorate

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### sportinglife.com February 10, 2009
Holmes calls for post-games legacy
By Helen William, Press Association Olympics Correspondent
Dame Kelly Holmes feels it would be wrong if athletics does not benefit as part of the legacy of the London 2012 stadium.

A six-week local public consultation on the legacy masterplan has now started. The aim is to plan for legacy early and to ensure the Olympic Park is sustainable.

Natural England welcomed plans for the Olympics to regenerate the deprived district including the creation of London’s biggest new park for more than 100 years.

“We believe that green infrastructure is critical to regeneration projects. With green space at its heart, the Olympic legacy plan should set a precedent for future urban regeneration projects across England.”
-Alison Barnes, Natural England’s director for London

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