Tag Archives: Landscaping

West Harbour Recreation Trail —Devastation caused to Rotary project

The three-year $200,000 West Harbour Recreation Trail project by the Rotary Club of Dunedin aims to beautify the edges of a 3km section of the cycleway-walkway, from the Otago Boat Harbour to Maia.

On May 26, a Friday afternoon, two Rotarians turned up at the boat harbour end of the Trail to set out the location of new exercise equipment for public use (in preparation for a June 10 working bee) – the next phase of the harbourside project. The men were astounded to find a council contractor, ostensibly there to repair the harbour wall, running heavy machinery across the mown green strip, seriously damaging the designated public amenity area.

While Rotary’s West Harbour Recreation Trail is a council approved project, and the extended site receives maintenance from Taskforce Green, the DCC had completely failed to advise and coordinate with Rotary before earthworks commenced for repair of the seawall. How does this happen ??!

Not such a bad job until you look westward, other side of the orange safety nets:

DCC Webmap – West Harbour Recreation Trail (damaged section)

Apparently, DCC has assured Rotary that the damage will be put right by the contractor. However, because of no drying for some time Rotary’s scheduled work at this site is on hold (at least a five month delay).

Rotarians had raised funds from the public to carry out the project.

One of the Rotarians said he was ‘incandescent with rage’ over it – and did not often get incandescent!!

On Tuesday (May 30) I visited the area to take photographs.

This is yet another example of council ineptitude where the left hand doesn’t know what the right hand’s doing. The council’s lack of oversight and the resulting damage may necessitate deeper foundations for the exercise equipment than Rotary had anticipated and budgeted. Their working bee planned for June 10 will be reduced in scale, with only installation of exercise equipment at Ravensbourne Footbridge taking place. The working bees for July and August have been cancelled as the site won’t be in a fit state to work on. Timing of the provision of barbeque facilities as part of the landscaping project is also affected.

There is the Huge Irony that Rotary have only just been awarded 1st Place by Keep Dunedin Beautiful, for their work on the recreation trail. The award came with a $100 cash prize.

Thankfully, say Rotarians, the damage wasn’t done until after the Trees for Babies planting was done on Mother’s Day (14 May).

The Keep Dunedin Beautiful Awards “celebrate and honour the people of Dunedin who are committed to beautifying their city and caring for their environment through volunteer action”.

“Each Autumn, in partnership with Rotary Dunedin, Keep Dunedin Beautiful organises tree plantings for babies and other family members in city reserves. Trees for Babies is a long-term native tree-planting project where family members can celebrate the birth of a child or any significant family milestone. It also contributes to a native re-vegetation project in a city reserve.”

Related Post and Comment:
7.8.15 Dunedin Rotary Club | West Harbour Recreation Trail

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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Dunedin Rotary Club | West Harbour Recreation Trail

Link and information supplied by Douglas (Mick) Field.

█ Message: I have been involved with Rotary doing the West Harbour Recreation project. I did a video of this as a means of describing the project – it sets out the scope of the work. I had a chat to Darrel Robinson who is in charge of the project for Rotary. He is happy for me to put it on YouTube which I will be doing shortly. Take a look.
Cheers, Mick

Douglas Field Published on Aug 4, 2015
West Harbour Recreation Trail 29 10 14
The West Harbour Recreation Project has been taken up by Rotary to provide and improve recreational activity as well as enhance the landscape along the shared pathway from the Boat Harbour to Maia. Already a lot of work has been completed. At present Rotary is completing the section at Ravensbourne Station and it is anticipated that the major recreational facility just north of the Boat Harbour will begin this year. Working ‘Bees’ are held once a month in conjunction with Dunedin’s Task Force Green team who do a great job in support and keeping the momentum up.
This clip outlines the scope and nature of the project.

█ Message: As a matter of interest, the seat installed at the end of the clip is in memory of Robin Archer, ex city councillor – donated by his widow. Robin was chief architect for the Otago Education Board before it was decommissioned.

Douglas Field Published on Aug 6, 2015
Ravensbourne Station BBQ site 23 5 15
The Dunedin Rotary Club has a working ‘bee’ every month on the West Harbour Recreation Trail Project. This one was in May when they installed BBQ equipment at the Ravensbourne Station site. As you can see these people work very hard and – fast. As always, they were ably assisted by Task Force Green workers.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Vogel St. Street Party | Saturday 18 Oct 3pm – 11pm [2014]

Updated post 7.11.14 at 6:18 p.m.

What change, collaboration and vision can do!

Vogel St_Street Party Sat 18 Oct 3pm-11pm[click to enlarge]

████ Download Map Guide for activity locations and booking information at http://vogelandbond.org/assets/VogelStreetPartyGuide.pdf

Building Tours - Vogel St Street Party

Related Posts and Comments:
█ 19.10.14 Dunedin: Randoms from inside warehouse precinct 18.10.14 [photos]
█ 22.6.14 Vogel Street Heritage Precinct (TH13) [photos]
5.8.14 DCC staff-led CBD projects that impact ratepayers | ….council debt
28.9.14 “DCC entitlement” about to ramrod change at CBD #manipulation

Photos by Glen Hazelton (Tumblr)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Vogel Street Heritage Precinct (TH13)

DCC Map Warehouse PrecinctStreet improvements under way for the redeveloped warehouses and other commercial buildings in the heritage precinct, including new light stands, plantings and protrusions — photographed last Saturday (14.6.14). Highly coloured seats and rubbish bins have yet to be installed. Read more about the project here.
Click map to enlarge.

Bike stands and a light stand outside Queens Gardens House, cnr Rattray Street:
IMG_4740 (1a)IMG_4735 (1a)IMG_4772 (1a)IMG_4964 (1a)

Light stand outside Phoenix House (45 Queens Gardens):
IMG_4752 (1a)

Looking south from Phoenix House along the west side of Vogel Street:
IMG_4736 (1a)

Looking north from Phoenix House to Queens Gardens:
IMG_4927 (1a)IMG_4947 (1a)

Former NMA buildings (note badly scaled and positioned sign):
IMG_4917 (1a)IMG_4899 (1a)IMG_4883 (1a)

Landscaping and protrusions for safe crossing:
IMG_4914 (1a)IMG_4910 (1a)IMG_4786 (1a)IMG_4832 (1a)IMG_4829 (1a)

Other views (including the former Donald Reid Store at 77 Vogel Street):
IMG_4809 (1a)IMG_4871 (1a)IMG_4803 (1a)IMG_4798 (1a)IMG_4835 (1a)

Warehouse Precinct Revitalisation Plan (PDF, 3.6 MB)
This Plan seeks to support the revitalisation to ensure the important historic Warehouse Precinct area becomes a vibrant and successful part of the central city, once again.

Dunedin Warehouse Precinct by Alexander Trapeznik, 2014, 188 pages with map and illustrations (PDF, 9.91MB)

Dunedin’s warehouse district is a newly rediscovered treasure. Spanning the few blocks stretching from the harbour-side to Princes Street, from Queens Gardens to the Oval, for many years this area slipped out of the public eye. The grid-pattern street layout contains a dense mixture of commercial and industrial buildings, typically between two and four storeys high. Many have a decorative façade to the street and plain brick or masonry walls facing their neighbours. Some became derelict, others home to a variety of uses. A few have been demolished to create car parks. Recently, many of the buildings have become the subject of renewed enthusiasm, being strengthened, refurbished, repainted and valued once again. –Trapeznik

Post and images by Elizabeth Kerr

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University: Leith flood protection scheme and landscaping

Water of Leith - University Registry area (odt.co.nz] screenshot

Proposed landscaping within the university’s heritage precinct. The St David St footbridge will be extended. [graphic via ODT]

### ODT Online Wed, 24 Jul 2013
Registry stretch of Leith set for summer revamp
By Rebecca Fox
The stretch of the Water of Leith in front of the University of Otago’s registry building looks set to get a multimillion-dollar makeover this summer. Students, staff and visitors could soon be able to walk along grassy verges next to lowered banks of the river, from the St David St footbridge to the Union St bridge, if a design plan is approved at an Otago Regional Council committee meeting tomorrow.
It has been about seven years since the council and the university signed an agreement to work together to produce a plan to suit the council’s need for flood protection and the university’s need for an aesthetic look in front of its historic registry building.
The council had budgeted $5.4 million over the next 12 months for the work. The university and the council are each to fund half the cost of the aesthetic work.
Among the work to be endorsed by the committee is the lowering of most of the concrete wall on the east bank, extending the footbridge, cutting down the west bank and landscaping and footpath redevelopment.
Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
27.5.13 Carisbrook and Leith flood protection
17.11.10 Leith Lindsay Flood Protection Scheme
17.5.10 Campus Master Plan
28.1.10 University of Otago Campus Master Plan

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Carisbrook and Leith flood protection

Received from Rob Hamlin.
Monday, 27 May 2013 1:03 p.m.

Carisbrook on Sunday (26.5.13)

Carisbrook 26.5.13. Rob Hamlin 1
A picture of doomed dereliction – Innit? I tried to take photos of this last week, but the weather wasn’t good enough. I seem to recall that the comb lines in the manicured grass were going in a different direction then, indicating that further ratepayer-funded pampering has occurred this last week. What earthly reason can there be for the DCC to be spending money doing this on a structure that they claim they have a) sold and b) issued a demo permit for? Some seats are missing (but could be inside). The lights are gone, but Delta bought the last set anyway so why not ‘play it again Sam’?

Otago Regional Council – Leith Flood Protection Scheme

Water of Leith 001 (1)001 ‘Sad Sacking’
The results of the equally seawall-like doomed attempts by the ORC and their representatives to establish a million dollar[?] lawn in the middle of winter in the bottom of a drainage channel occupied by a major flood prone waterway (the Leith). An act of simply heroic lunacy. This is the aftermath of the minor flood last week. The proto-lawn is covered in sacking further up the river, except for the bit next to the water – that’s now wrapped around the post in the foreground. Luckily it did not end up in the harbour – although many tons of silt presumably did. No doubt the ORC will be able to issue itself with a retrospective resource consent for this uncontrolled discharge into the environment.

Water of Leith 002 (1)Water of Leith 004 (1)002, 004 ‘Washed away’
For weeks now and presumably at great expense to the ORC, the contractors (Lund if the site signs are to be believed) have been laying down what looks like micropore mat, hexagon reinforcement, and what looks like a very expensive chicken wire plastic mesh combo – stitched together. They then planted grass on it. This can be seen growing feebly on the slope in 002. Alas, the minor flood that dislodged the sacking also gently sluiced out the soil and grass from the expensively-laid reinforcements on the level parts of the lawn laid (lunacy) right up to the edge of the river.

Water of Leith. Robert Hamlin (1)000 gives a higher angle shot showing the artistry of this now exposed and empty (of soil) soil stabilisation system, along with the feeble grass above it. I am not sure how they will reposition the soil into this stuff short of ripping it up and starting again. Presumably if all this expensive stuff was intended to stop soil coming out, it will be equally good at resisting attempts to put it back in again by mechanical means. Oh dear!

Water of Leith 003 (1)003 ‘Mighty defences’
Here we have what is actually supposed to keep the Leith in the straight and narrow from now on. This is the concrete shuttering for an incomplete part of the bank (this shuttering is now filled with shyte from the flood). The wall when poured (one hopes after clearing out said shyte) will be a worthy successor to the St Clair seawall – it is about 12 inches tall and 8 inches thick. It is plastered onto the top of (rather than onto the front of as with the seawall) the remains of its more substantial predecessor. The lawn (in the areas where it used to be there) starts directly behind it…

Water of Leith 005 (1)005 ‘Classy concrete placing’
The mighty foot-high defences take an interesting course in the photograph taken looking up the left-hand bank from the Forth Street Bridge. I do not know if this feature-bulge in the mighty wall is the outcome of a molar-like architectural design feature to increase the organic appearance of the site or if it’s simply a concrete shuttering quality control issue. It’s your rates money – you decide.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Photos: Rob Hamlin (May 2013)

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Have your say: South Dunedin Retail Centre Strategy

Issues and Opportunities Consultation Document
(PDF, 458.7 kb, new window)

DCC weblink for more information

South Dunedin has historically been an important manufacturing and service area for Dunedin, and it remains a destination retail area for a large number of Dunedin residents. However, the trend over the last 15-20 years has been for a general decline in the main retail centre along King Edward Street, and a comparative increase in large format retail activities on the adjacent industrial land along Hillside Road and Andersons Bay Road.

As a result of this general decline, many people have raised concerns over the increasingly dilapidated appearance of the main retail centre and the overall vibrancy and success of the centre from both an economic and social perspective. As a result, the Council has identified the need for a strategy to revitalise South Dunedin’s retail centre.

The purpose of the South Dunedin Retail Centre Strategy is to identify an integrated package of actions that can be used to revitalise the retail centre, both economically and socially. The suggested goals for the strategy are to:

» Re-establish the economic role of the South Dunedin retail centre as a retail destination for the city by developing the centre into a place that people want to visit and spend time.

» Restore the social role of the centre as a place that provides opportunities for local residents to make regular contact with each other while engaged in routine activities.

The package of actions required to achieve these goals will need to include actions by both the Council and the community, in order to be successful.

The Issues and Opportunities Document is open for public consultation from 14 April 2010. Submitters are invited to return the submission form by 28 May 2010.

Make your submissions via

* Freepost: delivery details are on the form included with the consultation document (address to Principal Urban Designer, Dunedin City Council, PO Box 5045, Dunedin)

* Submit your comments online by completing this online form

* Email to south.dunedin@dcc.govt.nz

* Delivery: Customer Services, ground floor of the Civic Centre, 50 The Octagon, Dunedin

Dunedin City Council invites the community to comment on the range and relative importance of issues and opportunities identified to date.

On Wednesday 12 May, a public open day on South Dunedin Retail Centre – Issues and Opportunities was held at the Gasworks Museum in Braemar St, South Dunedin.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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