Tag Archives: Landscape Architecture

New stadium worries, NZ wide + a waterfront, ours

Last weekend, Sunday Star-Times (Focus, page A11) featured three stories about stadiums:

“Nothing divides New Zealand like a good stadium debate. Kiwis can’t seem to agree how much the country’s major arenas are worth or what should go on in them. The Sunday Star-Times went around the country to investigate where the battle lines are drawn.” –Kilgallon

● Steve Kilgallon
Theatres of dreams: Auckland seems to have got itself into a real mess about shuffling its sports stadiums

● Sophie Speer
Costly venue turns off top acts (Westpac)

● Michael Wright
Covered stadium will wait (Christchurch)

Related Posts and Comments:
28.9.12 ODT preamble on Davies story
5.8.12 Stadium deathwatch

A SPECIAL OLD WATERFRONT WE HAVE YET TO HOLD IN TRUST ?

[even Jim Harland, former DCC chief executive, had a strong appreciation for historic ‘regenerated’ waterfronts; he showed me his snapshots from Boston, a people-place waterfront complete with sample of old ships… an update to my visit in 1984]

Yesterday, celebrating the centenary of Aspinall Joel Lawyers, a group of us took the harbour cruise on MV Tiakina. Travelling past the Fubar edifice, it occurred to me how bad the ‘shed’ looks from the channel. Most times I see it from Waverley, and although you can read it closely from there, there’s nothing like a confrontational boat trip reveal. If this is the best we can do architecturally, Dunedin, heaven help us. Thank god international cruise ships can’t make it to the upper harbour.

Ditto that for the ’27-storey hotel’ idea for 41 Wharf St. Take the Jetty St overbridge and observe the site from the front passenger seat as you head down the off-ramp to the Steamer Basin. It’s from here the gross misjudgement hits – why didn’t ORC and or DCC buy 41 Wharf St off Tim Barnett and enter consultation with the Dunedin Community on the best possible use and development of this and the wider ‘civic’ site that includes the wharf area ???

Dunedin, this tower design effort (what design?) is pathetic. People with no aesthetic sensibility are bloody wrecking our city’s waterfront precinct potential and future!

The Community should be saving the old steam tug SS Te Whaka (a gutsy workhorse form, now up out of the water, inviting rescue one way or the other) as part of the whole harbourside experience, for peanuts–compared to the monetary grief that will unfold if DCC allows the tower to be erect-ed… the disingenuous tall building means a lot of toes, one hell of a lot of shootings.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Architecture and Design: harnessing the collaborative energy

### places.designobserver.com Posted 16.09.11
The Art of Advocacy: The Museum as Design Laboratory
By Barry Bergdoll
Since 2007, when I ventured out of the academy to take the reins of the Department of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art, we have traversed an unexpected set of economic, social and environmental challenges in which the centrality of the design professions has become manifestly clear, even as larger forces — in which designers are too often complicit — act to marginalise the disciplines of architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, design and the fine arts.

The neologism “starchitect” has lost much of its lustre…

Having worked side-by-side with diverse professionals, I am more than ever convinced that a cooperative, multidisciplinary approach is fundamental to the future vitality of the field — and essential if designers are to contribute to solving the enormous problems of our day. At MoMA we have been trying to discover meaningful positions and prospects even as practitioners have been jolted into discussion of just where the moral compass should be set.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Wreck of the Hindenburg

Image posted by GoluBoy at SkyscraperCity on 19 March 2011, 09:42 AM.
[ownership information not supplied at the website]

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=74546277&postcount=943

Stadium Open Day – Saturday 11 June, 11am – 2pm
@OtagoNZ Stadium Preview Sure To Please: Just less than two months out from completion of Dunedin’s largest infrastructura… http://nzne.ws/7OQv

24.5.11 ODT Online: Ban on Mexican waves at stadium
World Cup rugby fans planning a Mexican wave at Dunedin’s Forsyth Barr stadium are likely to get a stern telling off from police.

(24 May, 4:27 pm) @Police_NZ News: It’s the Behaviour Not the Mexican Wave Police Say – Dunedin Police would like to clarify comments in relation… http://ow.ly/1cPJlo

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Landscape urbanism + ‘larger infrastructure of the territory of our cities and towns’

“Landscape is doing some serious environmental heavy lifting.”
–Adriaan Geuze, West 8 Urban Design & Landscape Architecture

### architectmagazine.com October 6, 2010
Source: ARCHITECT October 2010
Urban Design
Systems, Not Icons: The unstoppable rise of landscape urbanism
By John Gendall
Not long ago, landscape architects were often dismissed as the consultants who put finishing touches on a building site—the broccoli around a steak. But with landscape architects increasingly taking lead positions on large-scale projects, winning urban design competitions around the world, and expanding the design market share, broccoli, clearly, is a thing of the past.
In many ways, the bellwether for these changes was James Corner’s career arc. As a young designer in Richard Rogers’ office, he grew frustrated by a lack of collaboration between disciplines on the postindustrial London Docklands project. Setting out on his own, he founded Field Operations, which has transformed itself from a boutique landscape practice turning out small projects and academic essays into a significant urban design firm with high-profile projects around the world. The critical step in that transition was when Corner won the competition to turn Freshkills, a huge former landfill in New York City, into a public park.
Underscoring this trend, the Harvard University Graduate School of Design (GSD) is in the midst of expanding its landscape faculty by six professorships over two years, and its landscape student body by 50 percent. And landscape architecture’s academic expansion holds up with the most tried-and-true indicator: It’s following the money. Large corporate architecture firms are ramping up their urban design and landscape divisions, as AECOM notably did in 2005 when it acquired EDAW, then among the world’s largest landscape firms.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Urban Outfitters Corporate Campus / Meyer, Scherer & Rockcastle

Updated post 18.11.14 at 7:02 p.m.

Urban Outfitters urbn banner [urbn.com]

Innovation Incubator
When profits depend on employees’ ability to create cutting-edge designs, a business simply can’t survive unless its workplace is an incubator for innovation: Urban Outfitters “lives and dies in creativity”. –Richard Hayne

After relocating to an abandoned naval yard, Urban Outfitters, the retro-chic retailer sees revenue skyrocket—and once skeptical employees have embraced the gritty, but inspiring space.

Amenities such as a gym, yoga studio, dog park, and farmers’ market further add to the lively and informal atmosphere. The exterior landscaping was designed by Julie Bargmann’s D.I.R.T. studio, known for turning derelict industrial sites into vibrant public spaces.

### hq.construction.com 1 December 2009
Urban Outfitters’ Edgy Adventure
By Jenna M. McKnight and Sebastian Howard
PHILADELPHIA—Richard Hayne, chairman and president of Urban Outfitters, met stiff resistance when he initially announced plans to move his company’s headquarters from traditional high-rise offices to five dilapidated buildings in the decommissioned Philadelphia Navy Yard. “I wouldn’t say it was a mutiny,” Hayne says, recalling his colleagues’ reactions. “But there were definitely some blank stares and ‘are you kiddings?’”
The retailing giant, which sold nearly $2 billion worth of its clothing and apartment wares in 2008, for many years had been spread among six buildings in downtown Philadelphia. This physical separation was “horrible”, Hayne says, because each department was “unsure about what the other was doing”.
Increasingly, Hayne realised that to maximise performance his company needed a unified campus — and a generic office park was out of the question given the spirit and reputation of Urban Outfitters.
Founded in 1970, the retailer offers hip merchandise with a vintage twist aimed at trendy, young buyers. Most of its retail brands, which include Urban Outfitters, Anthropologie, and Free People, are housed in renovated old buildings with double-height ceilings and exposed brick, concrete and timber.
So Hayne began looking for a setting for his new corporate home that would mirror the aesthetic sensibility of his stores, and in 2004, he found what he judged to be a near-perfect spot: the naval shipyard, which the Defense Department shuttered in 1995.
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Urban Outfitters Corporate Campus, Philadelphia’s Navy Yard (2006) - Lara Swimmer PhotographyConversion of Philadelphia’s Navy Yard (2006). Photo: Lara Swimmer

### uli.org [Urban Land Institute]
Awards for Excellence: 2007 Winner
Urban Outfitters Corporate Campus
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

The Philadelphia Navy Yard, which encompasses more than 1,000 acres (405 ha), 2,000 buildings, and 2.5 miles (4 km) of riverfront, was decommissioned in 1996. In 2000, ownership was transferred to the Philadelphia Authority of Industrial Development (PAID), and the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corporation (PIDC) began developing the property on behalf of PAID and the city. The Navy Yard is rapidly becoming a dynamic and viable new business location, as evidenced by the Urban Outfitters corporate office campus, which was completed and opened in October 2006.
Read more

Meyer Scherer & Rockcastle- Urban Outfitters HeadquartersUrban Outfitters’ pioneering move has positively impacted the entire Navy Yard. A new creative district, with top advertising agencies, graphic designers, and photographers, is growing around the retailer. New coffee shops and restaurants serve workers and visitors alike. More than 4,000 jobs have been created in the Yard since the company moved.
worldarchitecturenews.com (Thursday 29 Oct 2009)

UrbanOutfitters 2 - Lara Swimmer [archdaily.com]UrbanOutfitters 1 - Lara Swimmer [archdaily.com]UrbanOutfitters 3 - Lara Swimmer [archdaily.com]More photographs of the heritage dock yard complex by Lara Swimmer at archdaily.com (1 December 2010).

█ Website: urbanoutfittersinc.com

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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After 2012 Olympics, the legacy is…

### architectsjournal.co.uk 27 January, 2010
Olympics site to become huge parkland post Games
By Merlin Fulcher
The 2012 Olympic site will become a public park when the games finish, according to plans unveiled this week. The scheme by landscape architects Hargreaves Associates will turn 101 ha of former industrial land into the UK’s largest new urban park since the early twentieth century.

Avenues of trees and hedges will be used to provide a ‘welcoming entrance’ to the area, and more than 4,000 semi-mature British-grown trees will be planted across the Olympic Park and Olympic Village.
Read more + Images

Related posts:
12.11.09 Zaha Hadid: ‘Gateway into the Games’ London 2012 Olympics
25.3.09 London 2012 Stadium legacy plan

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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What’s international landscape architecture doing?

Thanks for the RT by @durablegraphics on Twitter…

### asla.org 05/05/2009
ASLA 2009 Professional Awards
The American Society of Landscape Architects published the Awards listings in all categories, including images and Awards video, at the ASLA website.

The jury considered nearly 600 entries – the largest number in ASLA history – from around the world and selected 49 projects for recognition in general design, residential design, analysis and planning, communications and research. The awards ceremony took place at the ASLA Annual Meeting in Chicago on 21 September 2009.

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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Landscape architecture

Not saying these are all great examples even if the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects (AILA) thought so enough to make the video. We’re not privy to the design briefs so treat as something to think around.


AILAnationaloffice 13 February 2009
Showcasing Melbourne landscape architecture and the diversity of practice. Melbourne was the hosting city for the AILA’s 2009 national conference.

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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Singapore’s Waterfront Gardens @Marina Bay

### http://www.inhabit.com 21 December 2009
Singapore’s Largest Garden Project Unveiled
By Mike Chino
Designs have just been released for Bay South, an incredible botanical preserve topped with super-tall solar trees that is set to be Singapore’s largest garden project. Conceived by Grant Associates, the 101-hectare expanse of lush green space will be situated right next to the Marina Bay resort and will feature two botanical biospheres and a series of towering tree structures that double as vertical gardens.
Read more + Images

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Grant Associates and Gustafson Porter have won an international competition, organised by Singapore’s National Parks Board, to design Gardens by the Bay, part of the next phase of the city’s masterplan.

According to Grant Associates: This is the largest garden project ever undertaken in Singapore, and a landscape project of world significance. It is intended to raise Singapore’s profile and cement its image as the leading garden city in the east. It is therefore integral to the future planning of Singapore as a major global hub and business centre.

The masterplan takes its inspiration from the form of the orchid, and has an intelligent infrastructure that allows the cultivation of plants that would not otherwise grow in Singapore. The centrepiece of this infrastructure is the cluster of Cooled Conservatories along the edge of Marina Bay. The Cool Dry and the Cool Moist Conservatories showcase Mediterranean, tropical montane and temperate annual plants and flowering species. They also provide a flexible, flower-themed venue for events and exhibitions.
Read more

█ Download: PDF project sheet.

olruchimaru 06 November 2009

olruchimaru 06 November 2009
This is the second film created by Squint/Opera for the Singapore Bay International Design Competition to depict the client’s exuberant and ambitious scheme. It follows the flight of two dragonflies as they weave their way through the imagined gardens, guiding us through the unfurling layers of vegetation and the hothouse structures.

Squint/Opera is a film and media production studio whose unique work and methods bridge the disciplines of visual communication and architecture.The company makes short films, computer-generated visualisations, installations and interactive content to communicate architectural possibilities, putting narrative and humour to the service of deeply innovative design and techniques of illustration.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Abu Dhabi

End of last week, a colleague’s brother and his family flew out of Christchurch to take up work and residence in Abu Dhabi, the largest member of the United Arab Emirates federation and a major oil exporter. Population: one million.

It’s a place I know little about, except through Youtube videos profiling the fantasmic architecture and the forward-looking strategic plan.

At The Chronicles of Yarnia we mention Abu Dhabi will debut Personal Rapid Transit “Podcars” later this year.

Tonight, there’s more news feed on Abu Dhabi’s financial aid for Dubai.

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### TVNZ News 6:52PM Monday December 14, 2009
Abu Dhabi gives Dubai surprise bailout
Source: Reuters
Abu Dhabi stepped in to help fellow United Arab Emirates member Dubai with a $US10 billion injection, of which $US4.1 billion was allocated to troubled state-owned conglomerate Dubai World to pay immediate obligations, Dubai said on Monday.
Read more

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usnewsandworldreport 15 July 2008
Saadiyat Island in Abu Dhabi, UAE will become a cultural centre with organic, postmodern and cutting-edge architecture designed by world-class architects including Jean Nouvel, Zaha Hadid, Frank Gehry, and Tadao Ando. These futuristing buildings include the Louvre Abu Dabi, Abu Dabi Performing Arts Center, Abu Dabi Guggenheim Museum, and Maritime Museum.

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squintopera 17 June 2008
The Urban Planning Council of Abu Dhabi (UPC) appointed Squint Opera to create a short film illustrating their grand Urban Planning Guide for Abu Dhabi. The film was presented at Cityscape Abu Dhabi, 13-15 May 2008.

The film communicates the principles and visualises the UPC plans for the expansion of the city to attract investors, developers and architects. The UPC commissioned this film as an awe-inspiring vision demonstrating the scale, ambition and radical nature of the plan.

Alice Scott directed the six-minute film that describes the plan in 3D, bringing life to certain aspects of the unique environment and a future evolving culture. Through 4 main key themes (Green – Live – Work – Connect) we are shown pedestrians walking the shaded sidewalks, using the world-class metro system and trams surrounded by green, energy saving residential townhouses, villas, high rises, offices and retail developments. The imagery shows desert landscaping, renewable energy measures and water-cooling canals in the streets of Abu Dhabi and demonstrates a efficient quality of life for the future population.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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City waterfronts

### Radio New Zealand National 101FM 6 September 2009
Sunday Morning with Chris Laidlaw
radionz.co.nz/sunday
8:12 Insight: Waterfront Wars
Insight looks at the on-going tussle over the development of the waterfronts in Auckland and Wellington. Can new buildings re-vitalise the areas or should open space be preserved for public access?
Written and presented by Eric Frykberg
Audio | Download: Ogg MP3 (26′ 27″)

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### RNZ National Friday, 04 September 2009 08:50
Morning Report with Geoff Robinson & Sean Plunket
Activists cautious of waterfront development
Activists remain on watch as Wellington and Auckland city authorities intensify development of their waterfronts. (duration: 3′20″)
Audio | Download: Ogg Vorbis MP3 (3′ 20″)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Some thoughts

These are random, but as the site is again gaining momentum (strange watching visitor numbers fluctuate), I’ll add some other food for thought. I’m not saying they are relevant here, but to my mind all design is about the synthesis of ideas, from whatever source. So why not look at what else is being done and are these relevant to us or not.

The first I will just briefly talk about is old Carisbrook.

To my thinking modern stadiums have no place in a suburban setting. There are of course exceptions to this, where redevelopment has been restricted etc. I will never be convinced that Eden Park should have been redeveloped where it is, and in that form. Highbury, the home of Arsenal football stadium, has recently been redeveloped in a two-stage process. Arsenal and its financial backers were looking to house a champion side (ow that hurts to say that) in a modern new facility, with all of the bells and whistles which go with it, not to mention larger capacity. Arsenal (like most clubs in the UK) is located in a suburban location in North London, this is its major restriction, but was turned into its advantage.

The club built a new stadium at Ashburton Grove is an industrial plot of land just 500 metres from the old stadium. The new stadium is big, it’s brash and it’s also by HOK (Dunedin Stadium architects). Putting its architectural integrity aside, it’s regarded as a wonderful place to watch sport.

What did Arsenal do with the old stadium?

Simple, they are turning the old Art Deco structure into an apartment complex, with the insular looking nature of the complex to its advantage and redeveloped, the pitch into an Eden, an apartment common. All of the complex’s apartments have sold out, and this development is actually making the club money.

I’m not saying that Carisbrook is good for anything in its current form. It doesn’t have the stunning Art Deco architecture of the old Highbury, which is an advantage as Art Deco is among other things a very strong dwelling architectural language; it lent itself to this redevelopment almost immediately, and some bright spark saw that.

Now of course, Carisbrook will never be turned into luxury apartments, so what can we do with the land? A favourite saying of mine is the old, “we are limited only by our imagination”, and I believe that we are very much in that situation. This is a pretty prime piece of land (not in absolute value), but in size and location. It’s suburban, it’s in a lower socio-economic area, and there are shortages of accommodation in South Dunedin. Granny flats would be a disaster, but why not adventure into the social engineering and look at stunningly designed and landscaped low cost housing? There is a history in New Zealand of pioneering in this area, with the likes of Athfield’s work in and around Wellington providing immediate reference. Also the council flats in Upper Riccarton in Christchurch are another fine example.

This part of town will always be home to a mix of young and old people. Play on that, include in the redevelopment amenities that will foster the youth of the area to be active citizens of the area, skate park etc.

I’m not saying it’s what should be there, but there is no reason that social housing shouldn’t be considered worthy of architectural integrity; in fact, they are the very reason why architectural rigour shouldn’t be applied to this. And I am talking about the total built environment, landscape and surrounds included. The apartment developments within the lands of the University of British Columbia are a stunning example of the integration of housing and social space through landscape architecture, there are references points over the entire world.

This is just one suggestion for this area, I hope many people have more ideas. I mean the actual geography of the area is also fascinating, this could be an inspiration for something too. Or failing that, what’s wrong with a modern technology/industry park. The back of the site is already that, the front is suburban.

I’d love to hear people’s opinions for what we can do there. Don’t bother posting if your suggestion is to slap lipstick on the old dear and call it a stadium. I’m working from the assumption that it’s gone, and what can we do with it now.

Some links: http://www.designbuild-network.com/projects/ashburton/

Posted by Paul Le Comte

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