Tag Archives: King Edward St

Expedience: Dunedin City Council’s blunt instrument to demolish listed buildings

Resource Consent Application: LUC-2011-567
191 King Edward Street, Dunedin

Senior planner Campbell Thomson addressing the Applicant on behalf of the Dunedin City Council as at 27 January 2012, writes:

[excerpt, page 1]
“Your application for land use consent for the demolition of an existing building listed in Schedule 25.1 of the District Plan and located within a townscape precinct, at 191 King Edward Street, Dunedin, was processed on a non-notified basis in accordance with sections 95A to 95F of the Resource Management Act 1991. The application was considered by a Senior Planner under delegated authority on 27 January 2012.

“I advise that the Council has granted consent to the application with conditions. The decision and condition are shown on the attached certificate.”

Under ‘Planning Assessment’, Mr Thomson states:

[excerpt, page 3]
Affected Persons
No written consents were submitted with the application. No parties are considered to be adversely affected by this proposal for the reasons outlined below in the section headed Effects on the Environment. It is noted that the New Zealand Historic Places Trust were consulted as a Statutory Body with an interest in the proposal. Their concerns will be addressed through the requirement for an Archaeological Authority which applies to the proposal. There are no special circumstances which warrant notification of this application. While demolition of heritage or townscape buildings generally raises issues of public interest, in this case, the structural condition of the building has reached a state whereby removal of the building façade has become necessary as a matter of public safety. The key environmental issue relevant to this proposal is how to mitigate the loss of the building.”

It is unreasonable and erroneous, in the context provided by the letter writer, for the Dunedin City Council to state that “the New Zealand Historic Places Trust were consulted”.

It is unreasonable and erroneous of the Council to claim “No parties are considered to be adversely affected by this proposal”, supported by following paragraphs that do not mitigate the wrongfulness of the unjust premise.

The letter granting consent carries other instances of pomposity and disregard for due process. Where does natural justice fit?

This forum isn’t the appropriate place to debate glaring technicalities, in light of what ‘affected party’ status requires as a burden of care on the part of the Dunedin City Council. Suffice to say, the Council is telling porkies.

Furthermore, the Dunedin City Council cannot hope to reduce or limit the work, powers and functions of the autonomous Crown Entity, New Zealand Historic Places Trust, empowered under the Historic Places Act 1993, to just that of regulatory responsibilities regarding archaeological sites — for the Council’s own undemocratic purposes.

Certainly, not by Mr Thomson’s convenient slip of the Council’s red pen.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

### D Scene 22.2.12
Opinion: Protecting heritage (page 7)
By Owen Graham
When is a heritage building protected, and when is it not? That question is one that deserves closer attention as the effects of building neglect become more apparent in our city. In the coming months more gaps will occur in our city heritage precincts, particularly with buildings in Rattray St and King Edward St being readied for demolition. They were not damaged by earthquakes, rather by successive owners who have opted to diminish their attractiveness, economic viability and historical significance in what ultimately results in demolition by neglect. {continues} #bookmark

• Owen Graham is the New Zealand Historic Places Trust area manager (Otago/Southland)

Register to read D Scene online at
http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

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Filed under #eqnz, Architecture, Construction, DCC, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Media, NZHPT, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, Urban design

‘Brocklebank building’, 189-195 King Edward St, South Dunedin

189-195 King Edward St, South Dunedin, owned by the Brocklebank family trust, is listed as item B363 in Schedule 25.1 (Townscape and Heritage Buildings and Structures) of the Dunedin City District Plan. The protection required is the facade to King Edward St.

This is yet another of Dunedin’s historic commercial buildings which, over the years, have suffered from a lack of regular maintenance and repair to maintain structural strength. Thus building safety and performance have been compromised. Despite being tenanted (until recently), the building has been neglected to such an extent the street facade has begun to peel away from the structure behind.

The fact of the building’s listing is reason enough for the resource consent application to be notified by Dunedin City Council. This will give interested parties a chance to comment on the owner’s proposal.

A recent survey of photographic archives suggests the date of build is c.1883, or possibly earlier.

An ideal project for Dunedin Heritage Fund assistance: preserving the facade to King Edward St.

### ODT Online Mon, 16 Jan 2012
Delays frustrate trust
By Mark Price
The owners of the condemned Brocklebank Drycleaners building in the main street of South Dunedin are frustrated at a five-month wait, so far, for approval to knock down the building. In August, the Dunedin City Council demanded the building be emptied of its tenants and fenced off, because the facade was unsafe.
Read more

Related Post:
13.8.11 Building facade failure: “It’s only the facade at the front that can’t be used”

In Marc Price’s Saturday magazine feature on South Dunedin it’s interesting to read that historic heritage is being given prominence in the city council’s ‘urban design’ project…
http://www.odt.co.nz/lifestyle/magazine/194344/south-dunedin-steaming-ahead

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Architecture, Construction, DCC, Design, Economics, Heritage, People, Town planning, Urban design

Building facade failure: “It’s only the facade at the front that can’t be used”

What is building performance monitoring, cyclical maintenance, restoration and structural repair? Or, read: Good stewardship of the built environment is eroded by owners inclined to apathy and hands-off neglect, while they continue to extract rents from tenants.

Not helped by the Dunedin City Council’s half-baked street improvements scheme for King Edward St, South Dunedin, led by ‘feel good’ inexperienced staff. This scheme puts money to the likes of unsympathetic paintwork (destroying patina of age), ugly street furniture, and traffic management plans – rather than to the means of generating funds for building conservation, first and foremost to preserve heritage values and the community’s enduring ‘sense of place’ as the basis for future development and economic return.


Images (2010): Elizabeth Kerr

Brocklebanks Dry Cleaners owner Roger Brocklebank, whose family trust owns the building, said a family trustee had met DCC chief building control officer, Neil McLeod, about the damage yesterday.

### ODT Online Sat, 13 Aug 2011
South Dunedin building facade unsafe
By Nigel Benson
A south Dunedin building was closed by the Dunedin City Council yesterday and is likely to be condemned after its facade was discovered to be cracking and leaning. The building, on the corner of King Edward St and Carey Ave, houses four businesses; Fine Art Mounting, Dinkum Donuts, Feedback burger bar and Brocklebanks Dry Cleaners.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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South Dunedin main street

UPDATED

### ODT Online Wed, 24 Nov 2010
Plans for discussion
By Chris Morris
Dunedin Mayor Dave Cull hopes upgrading King Edward St will help restore the lost vibrancy of South Dunedin’s main shopping street. Concept designs for the project to upgrade the street are nearing completion, and would be presented to the public at an open day at the Dunedin Gasworks Museum on November 30.
Read more

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Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Public Open Day to View South Dunedin Concept Designs

With concept designs for the King Edward Street area nearing completion, the DCC is inviting the public to a second open day, to be held at the Gasworks Museum.
Jane Orbell, chair of the South Dunedin Business Association, says the Association has been meeting regularly with the DCC staff working on this strategy and the development plans and she urges everyone to have their say.
“People need to take this opportunity to let the DCC know how they want to their community look and feel. People may have great ideas that haven’t made it into the plan yet… let the designers know on the 30th!”
At the open day on 30 November, from 4pm – 7pm, attendees will have the opportunity to look at the concept designs, and talk to DCC staff over a cup of tea and a sandwich.
While this is an informal drop-in session, the public will also be encouraged to offer their feedback on the designs. Emma O’Neill, Urban Design Special Projects Manager says the feedback received so far has been invaluable in the development of the concept designs. “We have had great input from the community so far on the project, and now we want people to tell us what they think about the options we have come up with,” she says.
For those who are unable to attend the open day, the designs will also be available at http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/southdunedin from 30 November until 17 December with an online comment form. The project team anticipate selecting a preferred option in the new year.
Contact Steve Miles on 474 3459.

Last reviewed: 19 Nov 2010 12:26pm

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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Architecture, Design, Economics, Events, Fun, Heritage, Inspiration, Project management, Site, Town planning, Urban design