Tag Archives: Kerbside recycling

Green Island recycling plant

### ODT Online Sat, 21 Apr 2012
Recycling facility formally opened
By Chris Morris
Dunedin’s recycling culture has come a long way in a short time, helped by the city’s multimillion-dollar Green Island recycling plant, Mayor Dave Cull says. His comments came as Mr Cull formally opened the plant yesterday, nine months and thousands of tonnes of mixed recycling after the Materials Recovery Facility was first commissioned in June last year.

The recycling plant was part of a partnership between the council and several companies. The plant was built on Hall Bros land by another of owner Doug Hall’s companies, Anzide Properties. It was equipped by Carter Holt Harvey and operated by the company’s subsidiary, Fullcircle Recycling, which shared office space on site with EnviroWaste, which provided collection services for the council.

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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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DCC on new trucks and bins *sigh*

Dunedin City Council
Media Release

New Trucks For A New Service

This item was published on 26 Jan 2011.

Seventeen brand new trucks will form the backbone of Dunedin’s new kerbside recycling and refuse collections from 28 February. The range of trucks has been custom designed to suit Dunedin’s collections and conditions, with sizes ranging from 29 to eight cubic metres, Dunedin City Councillor Andrew Noone, chairman of the Infrastructure Services Committee, says.

Three types of trucks will be used in the collections: one for mixed recycling collected in the new yellow-lidded wheelie bins; one for picking up glass for recycling, and one for official DCC black refuse bags.

Principal contractor EnviroWay Ltd, a division of Envirowaste Services Ltd, owns and will operate the trucks, which are mostly “low entry vehicles”. That means drivers can operate them safely from both sides and while collecting, the sole operator will drive from the left-hand side of the cab, either in a standing or sitting position.

Having only one person per truck eliminates the hazards associated with “runners”, such as people injuring themselves leaving a moving vehicle, or being injured due to lack of communication between driver and runner. Smaller trucks for servicing some of Dunedin’s narrow and steep streets will be of a more traditional design, and two staff may be used.

Councillor Andrew Noone notes that the glass recycling truck is a new concept for a New Zealand metropolitan city, as instead of glass being mixed together during collection, the driver will sort it into pockets on the stationary truck as he empties the blue bins.

“So, instead of only being able to sell the glass as an additive for aggregate or for use as sand, it will be able to be sent to Auckland and made back into glass bottles. Another change to the present system is that the new refuse trucks will multi-task, collecting both the DCC black bags, and private green bins owned by Envirowaste Services. That will mean one less truck on each street per week.”

Contact DCC on 477 4000.

DCC page link

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Dunedin City Council
Media Release

New Kerbside Bin Deliveries Prompt Calls to DCC

This item was published on 25 Jan 2011.

More than 1200 residents have contacted the Dunedin City Council with queries as new yellow-lidded recycling wheelie bins are distributed across the city.

The DCC’s Customer Service Agency has put on three extra staff to deal with the calls, which were expected as more than 40,000 bins are delivered to houses ready for the city’s new recycling service which starts Monday 28 February.

Agency Manager, William Robertson, says most of the calls have been from residents asking about the arrival of their household’s bin, and he expects those calls to continue until deliveries are completed towards the end of February.

“Contractors are delivering more than 1,000 bins a day, and householders are obviously noticing the appearance of the bright yellow-lidded bins in their areas.

“Reasons for the non-appearance of a household’s bin, despite others in their suburb or even street, are varied” William says.

Delivery trucks could only carry a limited number of bins at a time, which meant some streets and suburbs would not be finished on the same day.

Also, about 4,000 people, who had elected to have an 80 litre bin instead of the standard 240 litre one, will have their bins delivered after the rollout of the larger bins is complete.

DCC staff were unable to tell exactly when bins will be delivered to each house, but William says contractors are taking about three to four days in each area.

When the service starts, the wheelie bins will be collected every second week, and can be used to recycle all plastics, tins and cans, and paper and cardboard which no longer will be required to be bagged or bound. On the opposite week the collection will focus on unbroken glass bottles and jars using the existing blue recycling bins.

Official DCC black refuse bags can be put out every week.

A calendar, which will be delivered with each bin, tells residents which week to put out which recycling bin.

Contact DCC on 477 4000.

DCC page link

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DScene – OIA requests about stadium endless?

### DScene 2-12-09
Editorial: Staying open (page 3)
By Mike Houlahan
On Monday Dunedin City Council adopted a policy of charging for handling Official Information Act requests. Section 13 of the legislation already provides a charging mechanism. Council has now formalised that into a policy, where the first three hours processing will be free, while subsequent time can be charged at $38 per half hour.
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Register to read DScene online at http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

Extra bin recommended (page 4)
By Wilma McCorkindale
An extra bin, probably yellow, is the only major recommended change to Dunedin City Council’s kerbside rubbish and recycling collection.
The kerbside recycling hearings panel wants a basic service comprising the current black rubbish bags and a two-crate recycling option – the blue crate for recycling unbroken glass, jars and bottles and another coloured crate for recycling plastic graded 1-7, steel and aluminium.
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Your say: Letters to the editor (page 8)
‘Stadium costs’ by Dave Witherow, Stop The Stadium President
Other letters with stadium mentions by [Marjan] Lousberg, Eli Kerin (Dunedin), Dennis Dorney (Calton Hill)

What’s on offer (page 13)
By Michelle Sutton
The spotlight is on Dunedin’s cruise ship industry, with planning for the way ahead already under way.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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