Tag Archives: Japan

Lexus UK latest design videos #cars #takumi

HAIL y’ballers on a budget bitches [greenie-cyclists @ #DUD]
Ain’t no down economy.

Lexus UK Published on Dec 21, 2015
Lexus on Ice: NX Ice Wheels
The Lexus hallmarks of expert design, sublime style, and supreme craftsmanship have driven their ethos of Creating Amazing for years, both in their production vehicles and their concepts. For Lexus’s latest project, they put a team master craftsmen to the test as they tackled their coolest concept yet: the ice-tyre Lexus NX. Driving on four perfectly-finished, hand-sculpted tyres made from optically perfect, crystal-clear ice, the Lexus NX emerged from its own test of craftsmanship and quality – a five-day deep freeze at -30 degrees Centigrade that left it clad in a thick layer of ice.

Taking three months from start to finish, the ice-tyre Lexus NX is the product of a collaboration between Lexus UK and the ice-sculpting experts at Hamilton Ice Sculptors. The challenge was two-fold: how to recreate the Lexus five-twin-spoke alloy wheel and its Yokohama winter tyre with incredible precision, while also making a wheel and tyre that would support the NX’s 2.2-tonne mass. Like the highly-trained Lexus ‘takumi’, Hamilton Ice Sculptors combine generations of experience using traditional ice-sculpting methods with the latest technology to design and produce their works of art. Employing advanced techniques like laser-scanning, three-dimensional computer-aided design (CAD), and multi-axis machining equipment, they could produce consistent wheel and tyre combinations ready for hand-finishing with traditional tools and techniques.

With the ice tyres ready and the NX suitably chilled in its icy chamber, the moment of truth saw the wheels and ice tyres mounted onto the frozen Lexus hybrid (which started first time, of course) ready for its first attempt at driving on ice. Part engineering, part art, this unique project came together to prove that anything is possible with the right combination of desire, skill and dedication.

While tires made entirely from ice may not get the best traction, they certainly look cool. To start, the car’s actual wheels were laser-scanned to ensure the rolling ice sculptures were a perfect match for the vehicle. After the wheels were set in place, the NX sat in -22°F conditions for five days before it was finally unveiled. The ultimate test drive is far from the high speed, closed-course stunts you usually see in car commercials, but given that the NX has a curb weight of about 4000 pounds, the journey is plenty impressive on its own. (The glowing blue back lights are also a nice touch.) You can watch the full process in the video above. [msn motoring]

Lexus UK Published on Oct 5, 2015
Lexus – Making the Origami Inspired Car
There’s never been a Lexus quite like it: sheet metal, glass and plastics have been set aside for the creation of a one-off, life-sized recreation of the Lexus IS…. Crafted in precision-cut card. Pushing the boundaries of design, technology and craftsmanship, this driveable, full-sized sculpture explores Lexus’s promise of Creating Amazing. Comprised of some 1700 individually shaped pieces of cardboard, this origami-inspired car is a faithful replica of the Lexus IS saloon, and is produced as a celebration of the human craftsmanship skills that go into every car Lexus makes. Many thanks to NVDK, a design and production agency, providing services for the industries of art, design and architecture, from concept right through to final production. NVDK specialises in digital craftsmanship, mixing cutting edge digital technologies with artisanal skills and traditions to achieve forward-looking results.

Learn more at: http://www.lexus.co.uk/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LexusUK/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/OfficialLexusUK
Instagram: https://instagram.com/officialLexusUK/

Website: http://www.nvdk.co.uk

Lexus UK Published on Apr 24, 2015
How to fold an origami cat with your non-dominant hand
The people that work at Lexus’ factories aren’t just employees. They’re craftsmen and women that take considerable pride in the standard of their work. But not all Lexus craftsmen are equal. At the top of the tree are artisans known as ‘takumi’. Their goal is simple – the pursuit of perfection in their chosen field, whether it be paintwork or welding, vehicle dynamics or interior crafting. They are responsible for keeping up the high standards Lexus demands of its vehicles. Becoming a takumi is no easy task. All takumi have at least a quarter of a century of experience, time spent honing their skills to a fine point. Several takumi have had their skills digitised and programmed into robots that recreate actions repeated thousands of times, so it’s vital that they’re up to scratch. Before becoming a takumi, candidates are assessed in a number of ways, but one is via a decidedly non-digital method – the Japanese art of paper folding, origami. Before they graduate to takumi status, candidates are challenged to fold a relatively simple origami cat. But here’s the catch – they have to fold the cat with just one hand, and in under 90 seconds. Oh, and it has to be their non-dominant hand. Challenging? To find out, we went to see Mark Bolitho. A respected name in the world of origami, Mark works full time creating paper masterworks for corporate clients, advertising and events, and is also the author of several books on the art. In short, he knows what he’s doing when it comes to folding paper.

Lexus UK Published on Oct 5, 2015
Lexus – The Origami Inspired Car Revealed

Lexus UK Published on Oct 8, 2015
Kevin McCloud drives Lexus Origami Car at Grand Designs Live 2015
Design guru Kevin McCloud launched the 10th anniversary of Grand Designs Live today by driving a unique, origami-inspired Lexus into the show at the National Exhibition Centre, Birmingham. The car is a life-size replica of the new Lexus IS saloon, created from 1,700 fully recyclable laser-cut cardboard sheets, capturing every design detail, inside and out. It has been commissioned by Lexus as a celebration of the human craftsmanship skills of the takumi, the men and women who work on the company’s production lines in Japan.

Lexus UK Published on Jun 29, 2015
How to draw a car – designing the Lexus LF-SA
Lexus’ striking design has always been a fundamental part of its appeal – it’s what sets it apart from other premium marques. And there’s no better way of getting a deeper understanding of how Lexus is designing for the future than by watching the process from start to finish. This video goes behind the scenes at ED², Lexus top secret design studio in the south of France, to show you how to draw a car.

UK Lexus Published on Apr 21, 2015
Lexus at Milan Design Week 2015
A closer look at Lexus, A Journey of the Senses at Milan Design Week 2015.

Learn more at: http://www.lexus.co.uk/

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Robert Hamlin: Dreadnoughts and Crosses #Anzacs #Gallipoli

Dreadnoughts and Crosses – How battleships brought the ANZACS to Gallipoli

By Robert Hamlin

Part 1 – The South American Arena

Picture 1 HMS DreadnoughtHMS Dreadnought: The revolutionary fighting machine, launched in 1906, whose namesakes eventually brought the ANZACS to Gallipoli.

4.00 am on Sunday, 20 December 2015 marked the centenary of the last man leaving ANZAC cove at the end of the Gallipoli campaign. By the time the Allies evacuated the peninsula after just over eight months of fighting, each side had lost just under 60,000 dead. By the military standards of other battles in World War I these losses were small. Despite this, for three combatant countries, the young dominions of Australia and New Zealand and the yet to be born Turkish Republic, the battle was a seminal national event.

For this reason the details of the battle itself are well known and have been repeatedly re-enacted in print, video and film. What has received slightly less attention is how the Allies and the Turkish (Ottoman) Empire came to be enemies in the first place. The Ottoman Empire was not part of the deadly twin daisy chains of alliances and obligations that dragged all the other great imperial powers of Europe into an involuntary state of war in the days after the Austro Hungarian Empire chose to attack Serbia. The Ottomans had the luxury of choice. They could join the Allies, or they could join the Central Powers. Or, they could not join in at all – the eminently sensible option favoured by the then Sultan, Mehmed V.

The convoluted and sometimes ridiculous story of how the Ottoman Empire eventually did get involved on the side of the Central Powers, and thus became one of New Zealand’s ‘enemies’, makes for interesting reading. It involves pride, greed, incompetence, insubordination, brilliant opportunism and desperate decisions made in haste with little information. Above all it involves battleships, the great floating fortresses that so disastrously possessed the minds of men both great and small in the first decades of the twentieth century. Battleship mania was a truly global phenomenon. Thus this story begins not in Europe or Asia, but in South America some eight years before the First World War broke out.

At the beginning of the twentieth century the four-cornered battleship building race between Germany, Britain, the USA and Japan was well established. With their greater shipyard capacity, this was a race that the USA and Britain should have won comfortably. However, they were hampered by their political systems. The governments of Germany and Japan, where democracy was tightly delimited, were able to pursue their naval build up steadily and in a carefully planned manner. In the USA and Britain public opinion and short-term political expediency made this impossible. Periods of complacency when shipyards were starved of orders for battleships alternated with periods of panic, when they were literally drowning in them.

This created an intolerable situation in British and American shipyards. Dreadnought battleships were at the limits of the technology of their day. Their construction required massive fixed installations served by enormous and highly skilled workforces that simply could not be assembled and dispersed at will. If a race-winning dreadnought building capacity was to be maintained, somehow the demand for them within these two democracies had to be smoothed out. Then, as now, it was realised that exporting these cutting-edge weapons of war to third countries was one way in which this could be done. As a result, both Britain and the USA became vicious rivals in the international export market for dreadnought battleships. The most skilled and unscrupulous salesman of their day fanned out from the British and American yards, backed by enormous budgets and the full diplomatic capacities of their respective governments.

The happiest hunting ground for these dreadnought salesmen was South America. Nowhere in the world had changed politically as much as this continent had in the nineteenth century. In 1800 the continent was sleepily divided between the declining empires of Spain and Portugal. By 1900 all this had been swept away and replaced by a series of young, prickly and increasingly wealthy republics. The largest of these: Brazil, Chile and Argentina had a particularly volatile relationship with one another, in which diplomatic tension, military posturing and sporadic minor actions created an ideal environment for battleship selling.

In Part 2, the activities of the international dreadnought salesmen across three continents create a ludicrous but potentially explosive situation.

Part 2 – The battleship barterers

Picture 2 Rio de Janeiro - Sultan Osman I - AgincourtRio de Janeiro – Sultan Osman I – Agincourt: One ship, three owners, three names

Once they had identified South America as the prime market for British and American battleships, the Edwardian dreadnought builders got straight to work. By various adroit manoeuvrings, the British and American sales representatives succeeded in selling no less than seven dreadnoughts to these three countries in less than three years. The process started with Brazil agreeing to buy three dreadnoughts from Britain in 1906; with two to be constructed immediately, and a third to be laid down once the first two had been completed. Argentina and Chile promptly responded by each ordering two larger ships: Chile’s from Britain, and Argentina’s from the United States.

However, the fever rapidly abated, and by 1908 the South American ardour for battleship building was cooling in the face of the staggering costs and risks of escalation. In the case of Brazil, an additional chill was provided by a major naval mutiny and the collapse of the rubber and coffee export commodity markets that had been expected to pay for the ships. As a result Brazil attempted to extricate itself from its commitment to build the third ship that it had ordered. The British fought hard to avoid this, and eventually their efforts were successful. However, the witches’ brew of conflicting commercial and political agendas that eventually preserved the deal also produced what was the most ridiculous design ever executed in the dreadnought era.

The Rio de Janeiro was built for show. The Brazilian government were determined that if they were going to have to pay for this unwanted battleship, then it should be the most impressive yet seen in South America. The choice lay between bigger guns or more turrets. Turrets won the day, and the Rio de Janeiro shipped seven, in a period when every other nation was standardising on four. This meant a big ship, but Brazil’s maintenance facilities were limited, which meant that the big ship had to be narrow and tremendously long. Finally the capacity for the officers to entertain in style and live in comfort had a far higher priority than other navies. The Rio de Janeiro had far larger internal spaces and far fewer watertight bulkheads than her equivalents. All of these requirements, plus a respectable top speed, meant that something had to give, and that something was armour. Rio de Janeiro had armour that was barely more than half the thickness of her contemporaries.

Perhaps as the Rio de Janeiro took shape on the slipway it became increasingly obvious that she looked more ridiculous than imposing. Whatever the reason, the Brazilian government decided to get rid of her. In late 1913 she was put up for sale while still incomplete, and sold to the Ottoman Empire for just under six million dollars – a respectable sum for that time. The Rio de Janeiro became the Sultan Osman I. The Brazilians, no doubt highly relieved, departed from the scene. The deal may have been facilitated by the fact that the ever-active British dreadnought salesmen had already sold another larger and far more capable dreadnought, the Reşadiye, to the Ottomans two years previously.

Although Sultan Osman I was the weaker unit of the two new Turkish ships, the situation within the Ottoman Empire at the time of its acquisition endowed it with a much greater political importance to the Turks. The Ottoman Empire, the ‘sick man of Europe’ had been in retreat for half a century. Provinces in the Balkans and North Africa that had been Turkish for centuries had fallen away. The retreat had been accompanied by a sequence of mass murder and ethnic cleansings that had left millions of Turks dead and millions more displaced and destitute within the areas that are now modern Turkey.

The Turks were aware that this process was not complete, and that the Ottoman Empire’s neighbours harboured further expansionist ambitions that would potentially leave the Turkish nation partitioned and bereft of any territory or secure identity. This was a national rather than simply a government realisation. As the government was both chaotic and destitute, the Turkish nation raised the money to buy the Sultan Osman I, largely by public subscription and a myriad of small collections in coffee shops and the like. Special ‘navy donation medals’ of various grades were struck and given to larger donors. It was an act that both presaged and represented the popular will that would lead the Turks to victory at Gallipoli in 1915 and to a secure independence in 1923. The significance of the gesture was reinforced by the name that was given to her – that of the Ottoman Empire’s founder.

In Part 3, British misjudgements over the sale of the two battleships turn a possible ally into a potential foe.

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ZAHA HADID – Tokyo 2020 Olympic Stadium

dkTV Published on Nov 7, 2013

ZAHA HADID – Tokyo 2020 Olympic Stadium
National Olympic Stadium in Tokyo by Zaha Hadid Architects
Area: 290,000 m², Capacity: 80,000 people
Estimated cost: US $1 billion, Estimated completion: March 2019

The National Stadium used for the 1964 Summer Olympics, located in Kasumigaoka, in Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan, will essentially be torn down in 2015 to make way for the new venue in time for the 2019 Rugby World Cup and the 2020 Summer Olympics. It will also be the future home of the Japanese national football team. The new Tokyo National Stadium is more than a large sports facility designed to the highest design specifications and functional requirements. It is a piece of the city’s fabric, and urban connector which enhances and modulates people moving through the site from different directions and points of access. The elevated ground connections govern the flow of people through the site, effectively carving the geometric forms of the building.

█ More on the Stadium and Hadid’s architecture at Google Images

ZahaHadid Architects Published on Sep 15, 2014

Zaha Hadid Architects
This film shows some of the people and projects of Zaha Hadid Architects. It aims to convey the ideas and ambitions behind their work. Some of their academic design research, with students from AADRL and Vienna University of Applied Arts, is also featured.

Aside —Fashion DOES something….
Science and Technology [see videos within a video]

Wired UK Published on Oct 18, 2014
Will.i.am and Zaha Hadid reveal PULS designs: full WIRED2014 talk

Full story: http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2014-10/17/william

Will.i.am and architect Zaha Hadid have collaborated on special editions of the recently announced PULS smart cuff, which they showed off on stage together at WIRED2014 in London. The PULS smart cuff — or wise band, as will.i.am jokingly refers to it — is the first wearable product released by his company, i.amPLUS. In the UK it will be sold by O2 and will be available pretty soon, if hints are to be believed. “I’m itching to say when it’s coming out,” says will.i.am, before not-so-subtly whispering, “Now-vember”, in the direction of the audience. The PULS is a “standalone communication and socialisation device” that contains a battery, speakers, SIM card and chipset. It sports a curved OLED screen and has 3G, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and GPS. “No phone required; this is your phone,” says will.i.am, demonstrating one of the two cuffs he himself wears on his wrist.

█ More Google Images for Zaha Hadid
Google Images for Zaha Hadid Product….

Zaha Hadid. Superyacht for Blohm+Voss - birdseye [archdaily.net]Zaha Hadid. Superyacht design for Blohm+Voss. Photo: archdaily.net

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Tokyo Skytree Town Projection Mapping 2014

The Japan Times Published on Dec 12, 2014

Tokyo Skytree Town Projection Mapping 2014
During this holiday season, Tokyo Skytree Town has launched a new projection mapping presentation – and this time they have expanded the show to Skytree itself.

Tokyo Skytree (東京スカイツリ — Tōkyō Sukaitsurī) is a broadcasting, restaurant, and observation tower in Sumida, Tokyo, Japan. It became the tallest structure in Japan in 2010 and reached its full height of 634.0 metres (2,080 ft) in March 2011, making it the tallest tower in the world, displacing the Canton Tower, and the second tallest structure in the world after Burj Khalifa (829.8 m/2,722 ft). The tower is the primary television and radio broadcast site for the Kantō region; the older Tokyo Tower no longer gives complete digital terrestrial television broadcasting coverage because it is surrounded by high-rise buildings. Skytree was completed on 29 February 2012, with the tower opening to the public on 22 May 2012. The tower is the centrepiece of a large commercial development funded by Tobu Railway and a group of six terrestrial broadcasters headed by NHK. Trains stop at the adjacent Tokyo Skytree Station and nearby Oshiage Station, and the complex is only 7 km (4.3 mi) north-east of Tokyo Station.

Tokyo Skytree [arabianbusiness.com] 2Photo: arabianbusiness.com

The base of the tower has a structure similar to a tripod; from a height of about 350 m (1,150 ft) and above, the tower’s structure is cylindrical to offer panoramic views of the river and the city. There are observatories at 350 m (1,150 ft), with a capacity of up to 2000 people, and 450 m (1,480 ft), with a capacity of 900 people. The upper observatory features a spiral, glass-covered skywalk in which visitors ascend the last 5 metres to the highest point at the upper platform. A section of glass flooring gives visitors a direct downward view of the streets below. The tower is illuminated using LED lights.

Skytree structural core [cloudfront.net]Illustration of “shinbashira” central pillar of Tokyo Skytree [via ajw.asahi.com]

The tower has seismic proofing, including a central shaft made of reinforced concrete. The main internal pillar is attached to the outer tower structure 125 m (410 ft) above ground. From there until 375 m (1,230 ft) the pillar is attached to the tower frame with oil dampers, which act as cushions during an earthquake. According to the designers, the dampers can absorb 50 percent of the energy from an earthquake. [wikipedia]

Tokyo Films Published on Jun 23, 2014

Tokyo Skytree
Tokyo Skytree Tower is the tallest building in Japan. It has amazing views of Tokyo from its observation decks. Oshiage is the nearest metro station to the sky tree town.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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UIA2011 TOKYO: 24th World Congress of Architecture

25 September – 1 October 2011

The World Congress of Architecture, a triennial event hosted by the UIA, is taking place for the first time in Japan. The self-proclaimed ‘olympics of architecture’ will be focusing on ‘design 2050: beyond disasters, through solidarity, towards sustainability’.

Built from a mixed program of lectures, competitions, exhibitions and workshops, this year’s initiative seeks to create a vision for architecture and communities of the future. Questioning the role and responsibilities of architects, engineers, and designers, the poignant topic aims to investigate the creation of sustainable societies, attractive cities and the protection of human lifestyles.

10,000 international architects/engineers/designers are gathering for Design2050.

http://www.uia2011tokyo.com/en/

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Postcatastrophe reconstruction – Schack Institute, NYU #eqnz

### nytimes.com March 1, 2011
Commercial
Born of 9/11, an Effort to Rebuild Shattered Haiti
By Julie Satow
Just four days after 9/11, James P. Stuckey, then a vice president of Forest City Ratner Companies, met with executives of Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield at Forest City’s headquarters in Brooklyn. Empire had been the fourth-largest tenant at the World Trade Center, and the shell-shocked executives were already thinking about new offices. Mr. Stuckey promised them a building in 18 months, even though, he said, “they didn’t have any floor plans, they didn’t know who had sat next to who, or even where much of their staff was.”

“Based on a handshake, we started to pour the foundation,” at the MetroTech office plaza in downtown Brooklyn, said Mr. Stuckey, who in 2009 was appointed a dean of the Schack Institute of Real Estate at New York University. Soon after he assumed the position, he said, he started to think how he could teach students the lessons he learned after 9/11.

The result was a course on postcatastrophe reconstruction, now in its second semester, where students devise building plans, work on environmental and social issues, and create financing models for real-world projects.
Read more

Habitat for Humanity International

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr (via @restorm)

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JAPAN Earthquake #eqjp

UPDATED Saturday, 12 March 2011

### See What if? related post and updating comments via this link

(Sat 9.02pm) @CEQgovtnz If u can’t contact family in North-East Japan contact Ministry of Foreign Affairs 0800 432 111 or from overseas +64 4 439 8000 #eqjp

(Sat 3.29pm) @nzherald Families concerned about NZers in Japan should contact MFAT on 0800 432 111 or 64 4 439 8000 #eqnz #tsunami

CIVIL DEFENCE
@NZcivildefence Only messages issued by MCDEM represent the official warning status for New Zealand. #eqnz #tsunami

Official Civil Defence Website http://bit.ly/d94pAr #chch #eqnz

(Sat 5.54pm) @NZcivildefence #eqjp Cancellation of National Warning – Tsunami: Marine & Minor Land Threat to NZ update 19: 1730, 12 March, 2011… http://dlvr.it/JzgBr

(Sat 4.28pm) @NZcivildefence #eqjp Tsunami marine and minor land threat warning in effect for NZ update 18: 1613, 12 March, 2011 A tsunami marine… http://dlvr.it/JzSbp #eqnz #tsunami

(Fri 10.05pm) @NZcivildefence A tsunami marine warning is in effect for New Zealand. A Marine Threat means strong and unusual currents are possible in the sea, rivers and estuaries. No land threat is expected at this time. #eqnz #tsunami

(Fri 10.40pm) @NZcivildefence We will copy our website updates to Google Docs while problems with www.civildefence.govt.nz continue. #eqnz #tsunami

@CEQgovtnz Please ensure you’re following @NZcivildefence for updates on the NZ situation #eqjp #japan #earthquake

Official Civil Defence Website http://bit.ly/d94pAr #chch #eqnz

(Sat 5.56pm) @CEQgovtnz No further tsunami threat exists for New Zealand coastlines #eqjp #tsunami National warning is now CANCELLED

@CEQgovtnz People in coastal areas should:
1. Stay off beaches #chch #eqnz
2. Stay out of the water (sea, rivers and estuaries, including boating activities) #chch #eqnz
3. Do not go sightseeing #chch #eqnz
4. Share this information with family, neighbours and friends #chch #eqnz
5. Listen to the radio and/or TV for updates #chch #eqnz
6. Follow instructions of your local Civil Defence authorities #chch #eqnz

Fri 11 Mar 2011
@CEQgovtnz An earthquake of magnitude 8.9 has occured in Japan. The Pacific Tsunami Warning Centre has issued a Tsunami Watch #chch #eqnz

***************

(Fri 11 Mar, via @Reuters) FLASH: Tsunami of 10 metres hits port in Sendai, northern Japan; power outage hits 4 million homes in Tokyo, surrounding area – Kyodo

(Fri 10.49pm) @DnCityCouncil Tsunami caused by earthquake in Japan is not expected to cause damage to Dunedin. Be cautious at shorelines.
More at http://bit.ly/dKJD6G #eqnz #tsunami

(Fri 10.16pm) @NZcivildefence The first wave to arrive to New Zealand will be in the areas around North Cape at approximately 0623 12 March 2011. #eqnz #tsunami

(Fri 10.13pm) @NZcivildefence MCDEM and scientific advisors are closely monitoring the situation to determine the severity of the threat to NZ #eqnz #tsunami

(Fri 9.44pm) @Reuters reports the earthquake was the biggest earthquake to hit Japan in 140 years. #eqnz #tsunami

(Fri 9.43pm) @CEQgovtnz A Civil Defence advisory panel has been convened to assess the threat of the Japan tsunami to NZ #eqnz #tsunami

### 3news.co.nz Sat, 12 Mar 2011 9:03a.m.
Japan buildings designed to withstand strong quakes
By Tom Parmenter
As everything shook in Japan people said the buildings around them moved like jelly. In many cases that’s exactly what they are supposed to do. Modern structures in Japan are designed to move with the earth rather than against it. In giant warehouses different techniques are tested.
Read more + Video

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