Tag Archives: IRS

DCC’s debt level — who do you believe?

Updated post 7.7.14

### ODT Sat, 5 July 2014 (page 34)
Opinion: Letters to the editor
Drastic action urged on DCC’s debt level
The recent Ratepayers Report on New Zealand councils’ relative financial performance makes for sobering reading for Dunedin’s 53,266 ratepayers. The Dunedin City Council’s debt per ratepayer of $15,093 is nearly the highest in New Zealand and is exceeded only by Auckland.
The DCC is amongst New Zealand’s worst-performing councils in terms of operating expenditure at $6885 per ratepayer, well ahead of the national average of $3175 per ratepayer. DCC employee expenditure per ratepayer is $1783, which is three times the national average.
It’s hard to believe Dunedin was once famous for thrift and living within its means. Mayor Cull and the new CEO Sue Bidrose must wake up and make some drastic cuts as soon as possible, given the DCC’s shocking performance compared to most other local authorities.
T. Stevens, Dunedin

[Dunedin City Council group chief financial officer Grant McKenzie replies: “The figures quoted by your correspondent are for the group position of councils and highlight the fact the Dunedin City Council has significant other assets (Aurora Energy Limited, Delta Limited, City Forest’s Limited and Taieri Gorge Railway Limited). The actual asset value for the group is in excess of $70,000 per ratepayer.
“For Dunedin, the average rates bill is $1750, which is the 13th-lowest of all the councils and reflects the benefits we receive from the wider DCC group.”]

I note Grant McKenzie leaves off mention of the stadium companies DVML and DVL, which are now part of DCHL, and the effect of their growing debt on the council’s overall position. And what of all misappropriation of funds and serious fraud at DCC, DVML and CST still to be revealed, you have to ask.

█ Ratepayers Report at http://www.ratepayersreport.co.nz/

Larry Mitchell’s opinion of DCC’s reply to T. Stevens would be interesting – further, it’s not like other councils don’t have their own companies or significant and strategic assets.

█ Then to blow everything out of Otago Harbour there’s DCC’s exposure to global markets through borrowing – see new comment by Rob Hamlin.

Related Post and Comments:
12.6.14 Fairfax Media [not ODT] initiative on Local Bodies

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

21 Comments

Filed under Business, DCC, DCHL, DCTL, Delta, DVL, DVML, Economics, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Sport, Stadiums, What stadium

DCC: New audit and risk subcommittee a little too late !!

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Audit and Risk Subcommittee Appointment Made

This item was published on 26 Feb 2014

The Dunedin City Council has appointed the first of two independent members to its new Audit and Risk Subcommittee. Susie Johnstone, who is managing partner of accounting firm Shand Thomson, Balclutha, has been appointed by the Council as Subcommittee Chair.

Mayor of Dunedin Dave Cull says Mrs Johnstone has a great deal of experience leading audit and risk committees across a range of public sector entities. “We are very fortunate to have someone of Mrs Johnstone’s calibre on the Subcommittee. Her skills, attributes and knowledge will be of huge benefit to the Subcommittee’s work.”

Mrs Johnstone is Deputy Chair of the Otago Polytechnic Council and a director of REANNZ, which is responsible for the provision of an advanced high capacity internet service to the New Zealand research and education communities. She is a Fellow of the New Zealand Institute of Chartered Accountants and a member of its Governance Committee. She has also served on the boards of Tourism New Zealand, the Southland, Otago and Southern District Health Boards, the New Zealand Blood Service and the New Zealand Hockey Federation.

Mrs Johnstone says, “I am looking forward to working with Council and am supportive of their increasing focus on the governance aspects of audit and risk. These matters tend to fly below the radar until something doesn’t go so well so the Council is to be commended for taking the initiative in this area.”

The Audit and Risk Subcommittee has been set up to provide the Council with a degree of comfort that risk is being managed appropriately within the organisation. The Subcommittee’s responsibilities include risk management and internal control and it will oversee governance policies in areas such as conflict of interest, insurance, procurement, risk, fraud, and health and safety. It will also include oversight of the Annual Report.

The Subcommittee will report directly to the Council.

At this stage, the Subcommittee members are Mrs Johnstone, Cr Richard Thomson, Cr Hilary Calvert and Deputy Mayor Chris Staynes. The Council will shortly publicly advertise for a second independent member.

Contact Mayor of Dunedin on 03 477 4000.

DCC Link

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Business, DCC, DCHL, DCTL, Delta, DVL, DVML, Hot air, Name, ORFU, People, Politics, Project management, Sport, Stadiums, What stadium

Afternoons with Jim Mora: The Panel today [DCC interest rate swaps]

### radionz.co.nz Monday 5 November 2012
Afternoons with Jim Mora
http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/afternoons

The flirtations of our local bodies with money mechanisms on money markets that may be getting ratepayers into schtuck.

16:35 The Panel with Garry Moore and Finlay MacDonald (Part 2)
Topics – Every schoolboy used to know that, at the height of the empire, almost a quarter of the atlas was coloured pink, showing the extent of British rule. An Otago University academic says Dunedin ratepayers should be very concerned about losses on interest and currency swap schemes that appear in the council’s annual report. Millionaire Kim Dotcom would be putting his money where other investors wouldn’t if he goes ahead with plans to relaunch Pacific Fibre, according to Prime Minister John Key. (24′42″)
Audio | Download: Ogg Vorbis MP3 | Embed

16:50 Jim Mora, Dr Robert Hamlin and guests discuss Auckland City Council and Dunedin City Council activities with respect to interest rate swaps (IRS). Together, the councils may have squandered up to $200 million of ratepayer funds. Is a royal commission of inquiry required? In Dunedin City Treasury’s case, interest swap rates and financial derivatives may be being used to ‘assist’ stadium financing, and much more. In the city council annual report the IRS activity goes unexplained, being recorded as (multi-million dollar) losses (see page 146).

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The (NZ) Banking Ombudsman suggests some customers & their advisers don’t understand the product. [IRS and Derivatives]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interest_rate_swap

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### stuff.co.nz Last updated 05:00 04/11/2012
Business
Banks ‘plundering society’ globally
By Rob Stock
Claims banks missold interest-rate swaps to businesses and local authorities have been making headlines around the world. Interest rate swaps are a derivative financial tool used by sophisticated businesses with skilled treasury functions to limit interest rate risk. But it is becoming clear that in places such as Britain, Italy and America, interest-rate swaps were sold by banks to organisations that did not understand the risks they were taking. In case after case, interest rate swaps often sold in 2007 and 2008 as “protection” against interest rates rising sharply have served mainly to protect bank profits by locking businesses and local bodies into high levels of interest ahead of those rates falling.
Read more

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This article is from the May/June 2012 issue of Dollars & Sense magazine.

The Swap Crisis
We have your city. Pay up, or else!
Interest rate swap deals have allowed the big banks to hold local governments and agencies hostage for tens of millions of dollars.
By Darwin BondGraham
In 2002 a little-known but powerful state agency in California and Wall Street titans Morgan Stanley, Citigroup, and Ambac consummated one of the biggest deals to date involving a type of financial derivative called an “interest rate swap.” A year later the executive director of the Bay Area’s Metropolitan Transportation Commission, Steve Heminger, proudly described these historic deals to a visiting contingent of Atlanta policymakers as a model to be emulated. Swaps were opening up a brave new world in public finance by extending the MTC’s purchasing power by $200 million, making a previously impossible bridge construction schedule achievable in a shorter timeframe. The deal would also protect the MTC from future volatile swings in variable interest rates. To top it off, the banks would make a neat little profit too. Everybody was winning.
Then in 2008 it all came crashing down. The financial system’s near collapse, the federal government’s unprecedented bailouts, and global economic stagnation mean that the derivative products once touted as prudent hedges against uncertainty have instead become toxic assets, draining billions from the public sector.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Business, DCC, DCHL, DVL, DVML, Economics, Media, Name, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums