Tag Archives: Hubs

ORC: City bus services, submissions

Buses, Dunedin [radionz.co.nz]

“Heart-wrenching” tales of parents walking with young children from Corstorphine to Dunedin Hospital or walking up steep hills carrying bags of groceries while buses zoomed past…

### ODT Online Fri, 12 Sep 2014
Call for cheaper bus fares
By Rebecca Fox
Calls for public transport to be more affordable and accessible for the “walking poor” dominated yesterday’s public transport hearing. “Heart-wrenching” tales of parents walking with young children from Corstorphine to Dunedin Hospital or walking up steep hills carrying bags of groceries while buses zoomed past were made to the panel of regional councillors Sam Neill (chairman) and Michael Deaker, along with Dunedin city councillor Aaron Hawkins, as they sat through the second day of public submissions on the draft regional public transport plan. About 330 people and organisations made submissions to the draft plan that contains sweeping changes, expected to lead to faster and more direct routes away from smaller residential streets.
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Related Posts and Comments:
28.5.14 Otago Regional Council: Buses —Journey Planner (now online)
10.4.14 Otago Regional Council + Dunedin buses
27.12.13 Otago Heritage Bus shines !!! —ORC holiday bus suspension…
24.11.11 Dunedin buses: ORC or DCC
29.11.10 Phillip Cole on Dunedin buses

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: radionz.co.nz – Dunedin buses, George Street

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Filed under Business, DCC, Democracy, Design, Economics, Media, Name, New Zealand, ORC, People, Politics, Project management, Town planning, Urban design

Veggie Boys blames resource consent


“Everybody says there’s a great economic boom. There isn’t in Dunedin, and we’ve got to tighten our belt.” -Marty Hay

### ODT Online Mon, 7 Jul 2014
Consent process blamed for veg store closure
By Shawn McAvinue
A costly consent hearing is being blamed for Veggie Boys’ Mosgiel store withering economically and it will close at the end of the month. Veggie Boys’ co-owner Marty Hay said the Bush Rd store was not economically viable and management had decided to ‘‘pull the pin”. The outlet had been open nearly two years but three months after opening, business became difficult when the owners were required to obtain a consent for it to operate, he said.
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█ Notified decision (2.5.13): LUC-2012-563 58 Ayr St, Mosgiel – Letter of decision. ● Note: Notified decision LUC-2012-563 removed from DCC online listings at http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/services/planning/browse-notified-decisions.

█ Non-notified decision (14.1.14): “58 Ayr Street Mosgiel (LUC-2012-563/A) – This consent was an application to/for s127 change or cancellation of conditions at 58 Ayr Street Mosgiel. This was considered by the Council’s Senior Planner (Consents) on 14 January 2014.” Go to (currently at page 2) http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/services/planning/browse-non-notified-decisions ● Note: DCC failed to consult the original 11 submitters on LUC-2012-563 before granting this decision.

Related Posts and Comments:
2.4.13 Dunedin: Developers stoop to resource consents instead of private plan change applications
9.1.13 Fresh veggies, a holiday mystery

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Business, DCC, Democracy, Economics, Geography, Hot air, Media, Name, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning

Christchurch stadium

“No stadium can make money unless it has millions of moneyed sports fans living within its catchment area.” –Lee Vandervis

Christchurch Mail 30-1-14 page 1 (1)Christchurch Mail 30-1-14 page 3 (1)Christchurch Mail 30-1-14 page 1 | Christchurch Mail 30-1-14 page 3

Related Post and Comments:
24.1.14 [DCC announces review] Stadium: It came to pass . . .
10.5.13 Debate over new stadium
7.10.12 New stadium worries, NZ wide + a waterfront, ours
30.9.12 Wake-up call for Christchurch #eqnz #SeriousFraud
30.7.12 National Govt puts champagne and stadium before shelter housing
3.6.12 Sunday Star Times: Stadium story: any sliced bread in the murk?
8.11.11 Christchurch: new temporary stadium
9.8.11 Christchurch’s AMI stadium
16.1.10 Deans Stand at AMI Stadium: DONE

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Debate over new stadium

CHRISTCHURCH —This means to see the All Blacks play at home against the best opposition, we have to build a stadium that is almost double the size of what we really need just for one event per annum.

Proposed stadium, Christchurch (Stuff 10.5.13) screenshotChristchurch Stadium concept by architect Thom Craig of AMO Design

The former chief executive of the council-owned VBase events management operation, now working in the private sector, offers his perspective on the debate about a new stadium for Christchurch.

### stuff.co.nz Last updated 08:39 10/05/2013
Opinion
‘Boutique’ stadium a better option
By Bryan Pearson
I follow the various discussions around stadiums and venues with interest, and thought that the following might help inform that debate. The most recent issue to surface in this debate is about co-location versus integration. If we are simply co-locating other facilities like offices, hotels, and so on, adjacent to the stadium (as shown in the design where there are standalone buildings at each end of the stadium itself) then, while it will add life and activity to the stadium precinct, it will have little if any impact on the stadium business case.

If we are talking about integrated facilities and design which reduce the cost of building the stadium and/or deliver non-event regular income streams for the same cost/investment, then it will improve the stadium business case.

The latter sounds attractive until you start to consider the operational challenges of fully integrated facilities where the 24/7 tenants are effectively displaced on event days. Of course, then there is the issue of supply and demand for commercial office space and accommodation. Already we are seeing large city fringe commercial developments (Victoria St, Lincoln Rd). Then there is the central city where some developments are under way but many developers are already struggling to build the business case due to high costs of construction and soft demand once you get beyond about $400 per square metre.
So where will office space adjacent to the stadium fit in a market which is already showing signs of weakness and over-supply? The reality is the only thing that truly impacts on stadium viability is commercial event days.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Architecture, Business, Concerts, Construction, Design, Economics, Events, Name, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Tourism, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

Emergency services: do you hub all the eggs, adding risk?

Fire Service Southern region manager Stu Rooney plans to talk to St John and other “sister agencies to find out whether doing something together is a far better use of public and/or private funds”.

### ODT Online Thu, 15 Dec 2011
Emergency services hub mooted for city
By Hamish McNeilly
The partial closure of Dunedin’s St John office – and questions about the state of the Dunedin Central Fire Station – has prompted a call to investigate creating an emergency services hub for the city. […] The Christchurch earthquake had not only raised issues surrounding the safety of some buildings, but also the possibility of emergency and social services working from a hub.
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Join the dots, for non code compliance…

### ODT Online Mon, 22 Mar 2010
Fire Service defers central station upgrade
By Debbie Porteous
Plans to refurbish the Dunedin Central Fire Station have been postponed after engineers found major conservation work and earthquake proofing are needed to bring it up to building code standards.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Port Otago downgraded to regional status only

UPDATED

### ODT Online Tue, 17 May 2011
Maersk to drop weekly service to Australia
By Simon Hartley
Shipping giant Maersk, Port Otago’s largest customer, is dropping its weekly direct Southern Star transtasman service to Australia, the country’s largest trading partner. While the financial ramifications for Otago exporters are unclear, Port Otago will lose 10%, or about 22,000 TEUs (twenty foot equivalent container units), during the next year.
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(16 May) News of Port of Otago’s downgrade filtered through on (Black) Friday.

It has yet to hit Otago Daily Times’ reporting with any force . . . we might get some analysis if we’re lucky, or interested.

Maersk. Fonterra.
Two cosy words that when read together spell no accident.

It’s been in the offing. Maersk has pulled the rugs on a number of New Zealand ports, Otago included – no doubt to ratchet lower port charges, not merely to facilitate freighting of New Zealand exports into Asia.

It’s far from clear what the costs of reducing local ports of call (in favour of long distance trucking and rail freighting to the North Island’s port of Tauranga) will be for exporters in the Otago Southland region.

We noticed, with suspicion, it was Lyttelton that walked away from a merger with Port Otago. We knew it wasn’t all down to [pretext] #eqnz.

We note too – sadly, for the regional economy – that Otago is frightfully good at exporting raw, not processed, logs. Such a very happy picture we have left of what POL is good for, apart from calls by oil boats and cruise liners.

We lost transhipping with no warning. Wonder if ORC is ruffled or upset. Who knew.

ODT has hidden or failed to surface with the implications of the Maersk decision, preferring to run a diatribe about KiwiRail and “inland ports” for Otago. It’s not as if the subjects are not connected. We expect the local newspaper to make the major news statements and connections palpable, in a timely manner.

A whole weekend has elapsed. Further, Maersk’s decision is in no way surprising, there was ample time for ODT to research the background.

Clues. Fonterra has been using POL logistics to prototype and determine how inland ports can be rolled out across New Zealand.

Worries. Port Otago has been on an export ‘growth wave’, not of its own making, for some years. Does the port board know how to create growth of its own or diversify its activities to meet the challenge dumped on it by (cosy) Maersk and Fonterra?

Did the port company properly attend to risk management before Black Friday?

(Aside) POL chief executive Geoff Plunket reiterates – as we learned from POL’s Peter Brown a few years ago – the company is of the view that State Highway 88 (Dunedin to Port Chalmers) has sufficient capacity to take all trucking freight. Public safety didn’t come into the equation then, and it doesn’t appear to now. But how many trucks won’t be using SH88 at all in the near future.

Lots to think about. Investigation required. News media, DCC, EDU, ORC, Otago Chamber, POL, exporters, port workers, unions, KiwiRail . . . it’s your time to start digging.

****

Friday 13 May
nzherald.co.nz Maersk changes to benefit NZ exporters
voxy.co.nz Maersk Line NZ Strengthens Links With Key Regional Hub Ports

Monday 16 May
odt.co.nz KiwiRail backs inland ports

****

Related Posts and Comments:
21.2.10 So where’s the media explosion?
26.2.10 Port Otago: “Next generation” project
27.3.10 Why should Port Otago dredge?
21.4.10 SH88 realignment
21.7.10 SH88 realignment – update

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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‘Big-box stores with big-city plans’

### npr.org December 21, 2010
Big-Box Retailers Move To Smaller Stores In Cities
By Franklyn Cater
Retailers have been following the growth of the suburbs for decades, setting up in shopping centers and big-box strip malls far outside the core of major American cities. Department stores that stayed in big-city downtowns have suffered. Others didn’t stay — they closed up altogether.

But a reversal of that trend is becoming apparent. Big-box retailers — companies that built their discount businesses out where land was cheap and space was plentiful — are now moving inward.

Both Wal-Mart and Target are prime examples of big-box stores with big-city plans. They’re aiming at the likes of Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, Seattle and Washington, D.C.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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