Tag Archives: Household recycling

DCC on new trucks and bins *sigh*

Dunedin City Council
Media Release

New Trucks For A New Service

This item was published on 26 Jan 2011.

Seventeen brand new trucks will form the backbone of Dunedin’s new kerbside recycling and refuse collections from 28 February. The range of trucks has been custom designed to suit Dunedin’s collections and conditions, with sizes ranging from 29 to eight cubic metres, Dunedin City Councillor Andrew Noone, chairman of the Infrastructure Services Committee, says.

Three types of trucks will be used in the collections: one for mixed recycling collected in the new yellow-lidded wheelie bins; one for picking up glass for recycling, and one for official DCC black refuse bags.

Principal contractor EnviroWay Ltd, a division of Envirowaste Services Ltd, owns and will operate the trucks, which are mostly “low entry vehicles”. That means drivers can operate them safely from both sides and while collecting, the sole operator will drive from the left-hand side of the cab, either in a standing or sitting position.

Having only one person per truck eliminates the hazards associated with “runners”, such as people injuring themselves leaving a moving vehicle, or being injured due to lack of communication between driver and runner. Smaller trucks for servicing some of Dunedin’s narrow and steep streets will be of a more traditional design, and two staff may be used.

Councillor Andrew Noone notes that the glass recycling truck is a new concept for a New Zealand metropolitan city, as instead of glass being mixed together during collection, the driver will sort it into pockets on the stationary truck as he empties the blue bins.

“So, instead of only being able to sell the glass as an additive for aggregate or for use as sand, it will be able to be sent to Auckland and made back into glass bottles. Another change to the present system is that the new refuse trucks will multi-task, collecting both the DCC black bags, and private green bins owned by Envirowaste Services. That will mean one less truck on each street per week.”

Contact DCC on 477 4000.

DCC page link

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Dunedin City Council
Media Release

New Kerbside Bin Deliveries Prompt Calls to DCC

This item was published on 25 Jan 2011.

More than 1200 residents have contacted the Dunedin City Council with queries as new yellow-lidded recycling wheelie bins are distributed across the city.

The DCC’s Customer Service Agency has put on three extra staff to deal with the calls, which were expected as more than 40,000 bins are delivered to houses ready for the city’s new recycling service which starts Monday 28 February.

Agency Manager, William Robertson, says most of the calls have been from residents asking about the arrival of their household’s bin, and he expects those calls to continue until deliveries are completed towards the end of February.

“Contractors are delivering more than 1,000 bins a day, and householders are obviously noticing the appearance of the bright yellow-lidded bins in their areas.

“Reasons for the non-appearance of a household’s bin, despite others in their suburb or even street, are varied” William says.

Delivery trucks could only carry a limited number of bins at a time, which meant some streets and suburbs would not be finished on the same day.

Also, about 4,000 people, who had elected to have an 80 litre bin instead of the standard 240 litre one, will have their bins delivered after the rollout of the larger bins is complete.

DCC staff were unable to tell exactly when bins will be delivered to each house, but William says contractors are taking about three to four days in each area.

When the service starts, the wheelie bins will be collected every second week, and can be used to recycle all plastics, tins and cans, and paper and cardboard which no longer will be required to be bagged or bound. On the opposite week the collection will focus on unbroken glass bottles and jars using the existing blue recycling bins.

Official DCC black refuse bags can be put out every week.

A calendar, which will be delivered with each bin, tells residents which week to put out which recycling bin.

Contact DCC on 477 4000.

DCC page link

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DScene bumper stories

### DScene 4-8-10

Hillside group ‘on tenterhooks’ (page 3)
By Mike Houlahan
Hillside engineering workshop workers and supporters have an anxious month ahead as KiwiRail prepares crucial documents for its half-million-dollar Auckland rail contract – paperwork that may hold the key to how much work might be made available to the Dunedin workshop.
{continues} #bookmark

Mayoral candidate (page 3)
By Wilma McCorkindale
Former Dunedin city councillor Lee Vandervis is having another go at the Dunedin mayoralty. Vandervis who polled second after incumbent Peter Chin in the 2007 mayoral race, announced today he is standing for the mayoralty in this year’s October local body elections. He has also put himself up as a council candidate.
{continues} #bookmark

Register to read DScene online at http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

Stadium will be on time: Farry (page 5)
By Wilma McCorkindale
Carisbrook Stadium Trust chairman Malcolm Farry, under stern questioning at a meeting Monday, assured councillors the Forsyth Barr Stadium would be finished on time, on budget. Farry said rumours that the stadium was three months behind schedule were nonsense when the subject arose at the Dunedin City Council (DCC) finance and strategy meeting.

Dave Cull said the trust report was “manifestly at odds with reality” and he would vote against the committee accepting it.

Farry said the October critical path had now been superceded by Hawkins Construction Ltd’s critical path which would probably not go public to avoid nitpicking around deadlines not being met.

{continues} #bookmark

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New service in February (page 5)
By Wilma McCorkindale
Dunedin gets its new $28.8m kerbside rubbish and recycling service next February, with another four months before rates for the collection kick in.
{continues} #bookmark

Talk: Dunedin on Dunedin (page 8)
Puzzling over drive
Letter to the editor by Bernard L Esquilant, Wakari
“…it is my contention that during the past six years this city has endured the decision-making of what must be the most inept civic administration in the city’s history.”
{read the full letter} #bookmark

Speight’s pride of the world (pages 12-13)
Dunedin’s best-known beer, Speights, has gone from near extinction to being New Zealand’s biggest-selling beer. Mike Houlahan reports.

Speight’s owner Lion Nathan employs about 40 people at Rattray St across all areas of the business, and is considering further investment in the city.

{continues} #bookmark #bookmark

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Check out the photograph of Rattray St in 1911…
and the superb image work of Otago Polytechnic Art School photography lecturer Max Oettli

A century on (page 15)
New Hocken exhibition depicts Dunedin in 1910 and 2010
By Gavin Bertram
In 1910 there were a mere 440 students at the University of Otago; today there are almost 22,000. The gender split is in favour of women, whereas in 1910 they were a fraction of the student population. This is just one of the huge changes Dunedin has seen over the preceding century, a subject broached by the new 100 UP exhibition at the Hocken Gallery.
{continues} #bookmark

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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