Tag Archives: Heritage resources

Heritage New Zealand

The New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT) – and now trading as Heritage New Zealand – is New Zealand’s leading national historic heritage agency and guardian of Aotearoa New Zealand’s national heritage. The environment in which NZHPT operates continues to be characterised by a growing interest in heritage, recognition of its social, cultural, environmental and economic benefits, and awareness of its importance to national identity.

The NZHPT was established by an Act of Parliament in 1954. The NZHPT is established as an autonomous Crown Entity under the Crown Entities Act 2004, and is supported by the Government and funded via Vote Arts, Culture and Heritage through the Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Its work, powers and functions are prescribed by the Historic Places Act 1993.

Heritage New Zealand – a change of name
In 2010, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage led a review of the Historic Places Act 1993 (HPA) and as a result of that work the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Bill was drafted and is currently before the House. It is currently awaiting the committee stage, and its third reading. The Bill includes provisions that will result in some changes to how the NZHPT operates, and to archaeological provisions of the HPA. It also proposes a change in name to Heritage New Zealand. The Bill will complete NZHPT’s transition from NGO to Crown Entity. To facilitate the transition, the decision was made to proceed with the name change ahead of the legislation. From 14 April 2014, the organisation has been known as Heritage New Zealand.

HeritageNewZealand 13 Apr 2014

Welcome to Heritage New Zealand
The New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT) has changed its name to Heritage New Zealand. Chief Executive Bruce Chapman explains the reasons behind the change.

Heritage New Zealand will continue to work in partnership with others, including iwi and hapū Māori, local and central government agencies, heritage NGOs, property owners, and volunteers. We will continue to provide advice to both central and local government, and property owners on the conservation of New Zealand’s most significant heritage sites. We will continue to maintain the national Register of historic places, manage 48 nationally significant heritage properties, regulate the modification of archaeological sites, and manage the national heritage preservation incentive fund.

While Heritage New Zealand receives 80% of its funding from the Crown, like many other Crown agencies it continues to be dependent for the remainder of funding from supporters, donations, grants, bequests, and through revenue generated at the heritage properties it cares for around the country.

Three key things remain the same under the new name:
● commitment to the long-term conservation of New Zealand’s most significant heritage places, including own role as custodian of 48 historic properties
● connection through members (membership benefits are unchanged) and supporters to the wider community
● continued status as a donee organisation, dependent on the goodwill and ongoing financial and volunteer support of the wider community for many of the outcomes the organisation achieves for heritage.

www.heritage.org.nz

Heritage New Zealand Logo

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Leave a comment

Filed under Architecture, Business, Heritage, Media, Name, New Zealand, NZHPT, People, Site

Facebook: Upright! Supporting Dunedin’s Built Heritage

Local heritage advocates have recently created ‘Upright! Supporting Dunedin’s Built Heritage’ at Facebook.

We want to see Dunedin’s built heritage remain upright, and for it to be kept up the right way: sensitively, sustainably and safely.

This page is here for us all — to share our opinions, knowledge, perspectives and love of this city. We can all benefit from the sharing of information and through this, develop a greater appreciation for our surrounds, and explore the potential for their enhancement.

Dunedin’s strong commercial and industrial past as the first city of Aotearoa New Zealand shapes our streets, skylines and even our psyches. It’s not solely the grand commercial buildings of the Exchange area, the awe-inspiring cathedrals and the stately houses perched on the hills that are significant, but also the lesser-noticed buildings that are equally worthy of recognition and preservation. To lose these to neglect, demolition or insensitive redevelopment is an affront to both our past, and our future.

Upright! Supporting Dunedin’s Built Heritage
See interesting Notes, Photos, and comments at the Wall.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

5 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Construction, Design, Geography, Heritage, Inspiration, Media, People, Politics, Town planning, Urban design

Dunedin, are you ‘of a mind’ to protect Historic Heritage?

Today ODT commences a new series about Dunedin’s historic heritage. The series continues on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday next week.

Despite the concerns, the calls for a co-ordinated preservation and adaptive re-use plan have been growing, alongside residents’ anger when they see much-loved buildings tagged for demolition.

### ODT Online Sat, 19 Feb 2011
Dunedin heritage: boom to dust?
By David Loughrey
Dunedin’s stock of heritage buildings is facing a problem more threatening than the ravages of time and weather – a lack of demand. Those charged with finding ways to preserve the city’s acclaimed architecture say this is a major problem.
Read more

****

Image ©2011 Elizabeth Kerr

‘Money and taste, rather than historical or cultural significance, frequently determined which industrial sites survived.’

### ODT Online Sat, 19 Feb 2011
Bell tolling for Dunedin’s heritage
By Stu Oldham
Decades of neglect may have saved them but further decades of neglect could see their demise. The bell is tolling for many slowly crumbling warehouses, factories, workshops, and head offices in what used to be Dunedin’s waterfront business and industrial precinct. Historian Alexander Trapeznik, an associate professor at the University of Otago, says the buildings might be part of one of the most significant and under-valued mercantile heritage precincts in New Zealand. Prof Trapeznik says the precinct has been “overlooked” by the uninitiated, in part, because of the sometimes “myopic” view of built heritage that prevails in Dunedin. It was an “unbalanced view” that focused on “the ‘great’ – the great churches, public buildings, grand houses” and ultimately, the great people – rather than on the socially and economically important workplaces that helped finance them.

Read more + Area Map

–-

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

4 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Construction, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Inspiration, People, Politics, Project management, Site, Town planning, Urban design

Vancouver – how to bankroll ‘civic responsibility’ in the built environment

### thetyee.ca 25 June 2010
Vancouver’s Architectural Revival
Behind the shiny surfaces there is a public logic guided by City Hall policies.
By Adele Weder, TheTyee.ca

[Editor’s note: This is excerpted from A Guidebook to Contemporary Architecture in Vancouver, just published by Douglas and McIntyre. A second excerpt on Vancouver as ‘supermodel,’ by Matthew Soules, runs next week.]

On Aug. 7, 1971, officers on horseback charged into a crowd in Gastown, the original downtown core of Vancouver, and swung their batons at the thousand people who had gathered or wandered there to protest marijuana laws and the nefarious police tactics used to enforce them. At the intersection of Abbott and Cordova, marchers and onlookers were beaten or hauled into paddywagons and the public gathering soon transformed into what became known as the Gastown Riot, one of the most notorious brawls in the city’s history. In the years that followed, the neighbourhood withered, its zoning geared towards the tawdry tourist outlets that would long dominate it, its days as a gathering site all but over.

Making architecture is, at its core, a political action. Implicit in the design approach is the decision to encourage or thwart public gatherings, nurture or displace the poor, ignite or asphyxiate street life, rabble-rouse or calm the streets for paying visitors. At first glance, the shiny newness of central Vancouver suggests a manifesto of clarity and order, a divergence from the fiery social consciousness of decades past. (To sample that sensation, comb through the photo essay of buildings accompanying this essay.)

Underlying these images of finesse and resolve, however, are backstories of complex negotiations between public and private interests whose endgame is the greater public good. With increased density allowance as the currency, the resulting deals have spawned an unprecedented array of community centres, daycares, parks, public art and social housing.

Gastown’s current robust and widely inclusive revival owes much to City Hall — the very institution that had sanctioned the police bullying and subsequent neighbourhood stagnation in the first place.
Read more + Images + Blog Comments

Adele Weder is a Vancouver-based architectural writer and curator, and co-author of the Guidebook to Contemporary Architecture in Vancouver.

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

/via RT @BusbyPW Vancouver”s Architectural Revival @TheTyee http://thetyee.ca/Books/2010/06/25/VancouversArchitecturalRevival/

Leave a comment

Filed under Architecture, Construction, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, People, Politics, Project management, Site, Town planning, Urban design

City heritage

Site visits had been held, and presentations from owners who had undertaken large restoration and re-use projects, and a “mini-conference” on getting started on large heritage projects was planned.

### ODT Online Sat, 5 Jun 2010
Heritage group finds some keen owners
By David Loughrey
Despite concerns about the loss of Dunedin’s heritage buildings, there are some “extremely enthusiastic” building owners, committed to making sure the city’s heritage is saved, city councillor Dave Cull says. Cr Cull, the chairman of a council steering group tackling the issue, said it could be six to eight months before a report with suggested solutions was tabled at the council, but feedback so far showed there were some people willing to go the extra mile to re-use their buildings.
Read more

Report – PEC – 08/06/2010 (PDF, 71.7 KB)
Heritage Buildings Economic Reuse Steering Group Update

Related Post:
Public meeting: planning the future of Dunedin heritage buildings

Facebook:
Dunedin Heritage Buildings – Stop Demolition By Neglect
(746 members as at 6.6.10)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Leave a comment

Filed under Stadiums