Tag Archives: Green space

DCC: Restriction of Vehicles from Parts of Jetty Street DECLARED

Received by direct copy from Lynne Robins
Wed, 16 Dec 2015 at 3:29 p.m.

From: Lynne Robins
Sent: Wednesday, 16 December 2015 3:29 p.m.
To: Karilyn Canton
Cc: craig.borley@odt.co.nz
Subject: Update – Proposed Restriction of Vehicles from Parts of Jetty Street

Further to my emails on the Proposed Restriction of Vehicles from parts of Jetty Street, please note the following update.

Council met on Monday 14 December 2015 and gave consideration to the recommendations from the Jetty Street Hearings Committee. Council approved the proposed recommendation and has declared parts of Jetty Street to be a pedestrian mall as per the attached declaration.

The declaration was been made under section 336 of the Local Government Act 1974. Under that section 336, any person may appeal to the Environment Court by 14 January 2016 or such later date as the Environment Court may allow. The Council would not oppose any request to the Environment Court by an applicant for the appeal period to be extended until up to 1 February 2016, but that would be a decision for the Environment Court rather than the Council.

A copy of the declaration will be published in the Council’s ODT noticeboard.

Thanks

Lynne Robins
Governance Support Officer
Dunedin City Council

DCC Notice of Declaration (Jetty St) received 16.12.15

█ Download: Jetty Street -declaration

DCC Jetty Street proposal - site mapDCC Jetty Street proposal 1DCC Jetty Street proposal 2DCC Jetty Street proposal 3

TOPICAL But what has Large Retail got to say on DCC Planning decisions affecting Large Retail [zoning] ?! Watch this space.

Related Post and Comments:
4.6.15 Exchange makeover —or pumps and pipe renewals, um

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

16 Comments

Filed under Business, Construction, DCC, Democracy, Design, District Plan, Dunedin, Infrastructure, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Proposed 2GP, Resource management, Site, Town planning, Transportation, Urban design, What stadium

Super Dave #DUD #CityRiseUp

Received.
Sun, 6 Sep 2015 at 3:32 p.m.
[click to enlarge]

Super Dave 6Sep2015

█ Download: Super Dave (PDF, 106 KB)

‘Super Dave’ was written in response to this news item:

### ODT Online Tue, 1 Sep 2015
Group out to protect City Rise
By Damian George
One of Dunedin’s biggest heritage areas is under threat from increasing development of high density student flats, a new lobby group says.
About 60 people from around the area have banded together to form City Rise Up, a group tasked with “maintaining the character” of central Dunedin and stunting what it says is a major demographic shift.
Read more

There has been no meeting of signatories since the statement was published:

### ODT Online Tue, 12 May 2015
Joint effort to tackle Dunedin’s drinking
By Eileen Goodwin
A joint statement signed by 10 organisations signals a new approach to addressing the binge-drinking culture in parts of the city, Dunedin Mayor Dave Cull says. Entitled “Dunedin North Issues”, the statement released yesterday says “pressing action” is required to keep young people safe, curb excesses of alcohol-fuelled behaviour, and protect the livelihoods of Dunedin businesses and tertiary education institutions.
Read more

untitled - posted to Twitter by @MartinShovel 6.1.15

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22.3.15 University of Otago: More national and global publicity #HydeStreet
18.2.15 University of Otago: Toga Party 2015 #video
16.2.15 University of Otago can’t beat broadcast news and social media #image
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15.2.14 University of Otago: Starter questions for Harlene

█ For more, enter the terms *university*, *harlene*, *alcohol*, *publicity*, *hyde*, *party*, *octagon mud*, *student*, or *blaikie* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image posted to Twitter by @MartinShovel 6 Jan 2015 – coiffure added by whatifdunedin

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Filed under Business, DCC, Democracy, Economics, Heritage, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Police, Politics, Property, Site, Tourism, Town planning, University of Otago, Urban design, What stadium

Significant tree: 28 Argyle Street Mosgiel – LUC-2015-296

As a community board member and a businessman-resident, Martin Dillon, it seems, has set a precedent for removal of (District Plan listed) Significant Trees from the streets of Mosgiel township. Not only this, his community board supports the destruction of many community-established trees at Mosgiel’s Memorial Gardens – to make way for a new swimming pool complex. Earlier this year the community board was ultimately responsible for destruction of the community’s beautification scheme at Gladstone Road (railway corridor).
That’s one hell of a lot of greenery you’ve seen wiped off the planet, Mr Dillon.
SHAME ON YOU

ANOTHER APPLICATION FOR REMOVAL – A COPPER BEECH THIS TIME
The tree is prettier than the freaking house beside it.

28 Argyle Street Mosgiel - LUC-2015-296 (significant tree) 3aSignificant tree – 28 Argyle Street Mosgiel – LUC-2015-296
Closes: 28/08/2015

Notification of Application for a Resource Consent – Under Section 93(2) of the Resource Management Act 1991.
The Dunedin City Council has received the following application for Resource Consent:

Application description
To remove a tree that is listed in the Dunedin City District Plan under Schedule 25.3 as T151 (Copper Beech).

Application documents
LUC-2015-296 – Public notice (PDF, 34.6 KB)
This document is the Public Notice for Resource Consent application LUC-2015-296

LUC-2015-296 – Submission 13 form (PDF, 78.2 KB)
This document can be used to make a submission regarding Resource Consent application LUC-2015-296

LUC-2015-296 – Application (PDF, 530.0 KB)
This document is a scanned copy of the application for resource consent LUC-2015-296

Notified resource consent details
Closing date: 28/08/2015
Consent number: Significant tree – 28 Argyle Street Mosgiel – LUC-2015-296

Name of applicant: M J Sproule & J A Maxwell

Location of site: 28 Argyle Street, Mosgiel, being that land legally described as Lot 3 Deposited Plan, 470637 held in Computer Freehold Register 636380

Address for service: M J Sproule & J A Maxwell, 34A Ayr Street, Mosgiel 9024

Online submissions: Online submission form

http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/council-online/notified-resource-consents/current-consultation/significant-tree-28-argyle-street-Mosgiel

LUC-2015-296 [excerpts from application]

28 Argyle Street Mosgiel - LUC-2015-296 (significant tree)

28 Argyle Street Mosgiel - LUC-2015-296 (significant tree) 1

DCC on Significant Trees
Dunedin City District Plan — Schedule 25.3 Significant Trees (PDF, 275.6 KB)

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24.7.15 Hands off Mosgiel Memorial Gardens
20.3.15 DESTROYED, beautification project —Railway corridor, Gladstone Road
14.12.14 Significant Tree: 23 Church St, Mosgiel [Applicant: M L & M C Dillon]
15.5.14 Significant Tree: 28A Heriot Row
22.2.13 DCC: Significant Trees

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

3 Comments

Filed under Business, Construction, DCC, Democracy, Design, Economics, Heritage, Name, New Zealand, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, Urban design

Hands off Mosgiel Memorial Gardens

Received from Brian Miller
‎Fri‎, ‎24‎ ‎July ‎2015 at ‎1‎:‎43‎ ‎p.m.

Hands off Mosgiel Memorial Garden 3

█ Trees and green space at Mosgiel Memorial Gardens poised for destruction if DCC develops a community pool on site. Photographs by Brian Miller.

Memorial Park, Mosgiel 1.jpgMemorial Park, Mosgiel 2aMemorial Park, Mosgiel 3.jpgMemorial Park, Mosgiel 4.jpgMemorial Park, Mosgiel 5.jpgMemorial Park, Mosgiel 6.jpgMemorial Park, Mosgiel 7.jpgMemorial Park, Mosgiel 8.jpgMemorial Park, Mosgiel 9.jpgMemorial Park, Mosgiel 10.jpgMemorial Park, Mosgiel 11.jpgMemorial Park, Mosgiel 12Memorial Park, Mosgiel 13Memorial Park, Mosgiel 14

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20.3.15 DESTROYED, beautification project —Railway corridor, Gladstone Road

█ For more, enter “pool*, *taieri*, *mosgiel*, *secret* or *community board* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

23 Comments

Filed under Business, Construction, DCC, Democracy, Design, Economics, Heritage, Inspiration, Name, New Zealand, People, Politics, Pools, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, Urban design

Exchange makeover —or pumps and pipe renewals, um

The Exchange, Dunedin [mp_natlib_govt_nz PAColl-8163-60] 1Image: National Library of New Zealand

COUNCIL NEWS

### ODT Online Tue, 26 May 2015
Council goes with Exchange revamp
By Chris Morris
The Dunedin City Council is to press ahead with a $1.1 million plan to revamp Exchange Square and create new car-free zones in the Warehouse Precinct. Councillors at yesterday’s full council meeting voted to approve both projects for public consultation over the next few months, which could be followed by construction later this year. Plans for the Exchange envisaged a $602,000 revamp, paid for from existing budgets and including a new layout, new grey-blue concrete paving, furniture, plantings and LED lighting.
Read more

During Long Term Plan deliberations, the council had brought forward a $602,000 upgrade of Exchange Square. Tony Offen says he supports the council’s plans, but wants to have more direct input to help refine the details.

### ODT Online Thu, 4 Jun 2015
Exchange should be ‘showcase’
By Chris Morris
A new group created to push for improvements in Dunedin’s Exchange says the area should be a “showcase” for the city. Tony Offen, a Dunedin businessman and John Wickliffe House co-owner, has created the group Vibrant Exchange to work with the Dunedin City Council on planned improvements. The informal movement so far represented the building’s co-owners and their interests, but Mr Offen told the Otago Daily Times he hoped to expand the group’s reach over time.
Read more

AGREE. POSITIVE. OWN THAT SPACE.
Businesses in the Exchange Area should not accept carte blanche anything proposed, detailed or supervised by the Conflicted Hat mural pushing make-believer(s) scarcely out of shorts. And who was it, dishonest enough NOT to declare the $600,000 unspent budget at Transportation Planning, which was SUDDENLY (!!) prostituted for the cause – when council departments had been asked to flag unspent budgets for potential retirement of council debt. Of course, this low manoeuvre stabs to the very heart of motives. Those of our DCC chief executive, frothed by the boy scout, sullied by the likes of Bendan Grope and Death Cull riding the back of the penultimate vote-catching Pet Project.

Anyhow, businesses/property investors are more fully capable of leading and dispensing greater aesthetics and improved public facilities than DCC, with its penchant for UGLY bloody curb protrusions and cycle lanes.

Then. South Dunedin went to flood.

█ Wikipedia: Princes Street, Dunedin

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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

34 Comments

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DCC could foil best landscape solution for Ellis Park

Ellis Park proposed softball clubroomsImage Source: ODT

Ellis Park neighbours Kerry and Elizabeth Goodhew express their frustration at the planned location and style for softball clubrooms at Ellis Park, and at what they see as a lack of Dunedin City Council consultation and poor processes.

### ODT Online Mon, 18 Feb 2013
Opinion
Consultation goes long way to good results
By Kerry and Elizabeth Goodhew
We wish to say for the fourth time that we are not opposed to clubrooms on Ellis Park. We never have been. All three of our submissions from October, two written and one oral at the consent hearing, opened clearly and firmly with comment that: ”We fully agree that softball should have a clubrooms and toilet facilities in the vicinity of Ellis Park.” Next year we will have loved living here 20 years, and all we have asked is that the clubrooms and toilets not be placed in front of our homes.
If you walk/jog/bike/ride a horse along Frasers Rd, and hundreds enjoy doing this, stand at the children’s playground, hundreds use this, and look up the park to imagine two gulag-style prefab buildings joined together two storeys high park-side, on rows of telegraph poles extending 33m into the park, to obliterate the beautiful ”green-scape” view up the park. Is there anybody else in this city (other than council staff or softball interests) who really thinks that this is the right thing to do at that location?
One of the senior officers from the council itself, the landscape architect, does not think so. He states: ”The visual character would be adversely affected” and ”what is now a balanced visual outlook viewed from the playing field or Frasers Rd would be downgraded”. Read ”ruined”.
It was our submission to locate the building elsewhere for all but one of the suggested locations. Before a meeting and our submission, council staff had not considered other places elsewhere on Ellis Park as there is no statement to that effect in the application. Our suggestions were a surprise to them.
Read more

Related Items:
ODT 1.2.13 Upgrade project at park defended
ODT 3.1.13 Ellis Park plans an ‘abomination’
The Star [undated] Otago Softball dreams of new rooms but neighbours have other views

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

2 Comments

Filed under Construction, DCC, Design, Economics, Media, Name, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Town planning, Urban design

Vancouver – how to bankroll ‘civic responsibility’ in the built environment

### thetyee.ca 25 June 2010
Vancouver’s Architectural Revival
Behind the shiny surfaces there is a public logic guided by City Hall policies.
By Adele Weder, TheTyee.ca

[Editor’s note: This is excerpted from A Guidebook to Contemporary Architecture in Vancouver, just published by Douglas and McIntyre. A second excerpt on Vancouver as ‘supermodel,’ by Matthew Soules, runs next week.]

On Aug. 7, 1971, officers on horseback charged into a crowd in Gastown, the original downtown core of Vancouver, and swung their batons at the thousand people who had gathered or wandered there to protest marijuana laws and the nefarious police tactics used to enforce them. At the intersection of Abbott and Cordova, marchers and onlookers were beaten or hauled into paddywagons and the public gathering soon transformed into what became known as the Gastown Riot, one of the most notorious brawls in the city’s history. In the years that followed, the neighbourhood withered, its zoning geared towards the tawdry tourist outlets that would long dominate it, its days as a gathering site all but over.

Making architecture is, at its core, a political action. Implicit in the design approach is the decision to encourage or thwart public gatherings, nurture or displace the poor, ignite or asphyxiate street life, rabble-rouse or calm the streets for paying visitors. At first glance, the shiny newness of central Vancouver suggests a manifesto of clarity and order, a divergence from the fiery social consciousness of decades past. (To sample that sensation, comb through the photo essay of buildings accompanying this essay.)

Underlying these images of finesse and resolve, however, are backstories of complex negotiations between public and private interests whose endgame is the greater public good. With increased density allowance as the currency, the resulting deals have spawned an unprecedented array of community centres, daycares, parks, public art and social housing.

Gastown’s current robust and widely inclusive revival owes much to City Hall — the very institution that had sanctioned the police bullying and subsequent neighbourhood stagnation in the first place.
Read more + Images + Blog Comments

Adele Weder is a Vancouver-based architectural writer and curator, and co-author of the Guidebook to Contemporary Architecture in Vancouver.

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

/via RT @BusbyPW Vancouver”s Architectural Revival @TheTyee http://thetyee.ca/Books/2010/06/25/VancouversArchitecturalRevival/

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