Tag Archives: Foster

Foster on Christchurch rebuild – typical architect, didn’t mention the housing #eqnz

Emergency and permanent new housing is typically remote from the mind of star architects in their initial statements – would you trust them with your most pressing needs for accommodation, security and safety – if their minds are elsewhere . . .

The importance of a city is less about its individual buildings – it’s much more about its public spaces, its routes, its main street, how you move from one place to another, the infrastructure. The buildings are secondary. But if there’s a loved building, why not reconstruct it?

### stuff.co.nz Last updated 05:00 13/03/2011
Sunday Star Times – Voices from abroad
LORD FOSTER: Superstar British architect
Norman Foster, whose iconic projects include the London’s soaring “gherkin” skyscraper, Hong Kong’s international airport and the 1999 restoration of Berlin’s Reichstag, told the Sunday Star-Times that although he doesn’t know Christchurch well, there are some fundamental principles to bear in mind when rebuilding a shattered city. What happens now is going to affect future generations for hundreds of years to come so it has to be blessed with wisdom. You have three commodities: time, money and creative energy, and creative energy is the most important resource of all. It’s not how much money you have; it’s not how much time you have; it’s how wisely you use it.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Leave a comment

Filed under Architecture, Construction, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, People, Politics, Project management, Site, Town planning, Urban design

Norman Foster, [A]rchitect

As the great British architect Norman Foster turns 75, he talks to Jonathan Glancey about flying cars, his new underground city – and how he beat bowel cancer.

### guardian.co.uk Tuesday 29 June 2010 21.31 BST
Norman Foster at 75: Norman’s conquests
By Jonathan Glancey
“The other day,” says Norman Foster, “I was counting the number of aircraft I’ve flown: from sailplanes and a Spitfire to a Cessna Citation. By chance, it comes to 75.” So Foster, who turned 75 this month, has decided to make models of all 75, to hang in his own personal museum, which he keeps at his Swiss home, an 18th-century chateau set in vineyards between Lausanne and Geneva.
These model aircraft will hover over his collection of some of the 20th-century’s greatest machines, cherished for both their engineering brilliance and streamlined beauty; many of them look like winged or wheeled versions of Foster’s most innovative buildings. “At the moment,” says the architect, “I’m restoring a Citroën Sahara, designed to tackle north African dunes. I’m also thinking of getting a Bell 47 helicopter as a focal point. And I’ve had a model made of the Graf Zeppelin airship.”
The subject [architecture] is too often treated as a fine art, delicately wrapped in mumbo-jumbo. In reality, it’s an all-embracing discipline taking in science, art, maths, engineering, climate, nature, politics, economics. Every time I’ve flown an aircraft, or visited a steelworks, or watched a panel-beater at work, I’ve learned something new that can be applied to buildings.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

7 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Design, Geography, Innovation, Inspiration, Media, Name, People, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, Urban design