Tag Archives: Former Logan Park Art Gallery

Old Logan Park Art Gallery

A great weekend feature in Otago Daily Times, thanks Kim!

### ODT Online Sat, 4 Dec 2010
‘Fantastic compromise’ saves day
By Kim Dungey
The former Logan Park art gallery is a good example of how heritage significance is not just about pretty buildings, says Jackie Gillies, the architect who has prepared plans for the building’s refurbishment. Few people would use the word pretty to describe the building, a restrained design that was typical of the 1920s and a reaction against the fussy architecture of the late-Victorian era. But Ms Gillies says social and cultural significance are also important.

“In an ideal world, [the former gallery] would not have been reduced in size … But I’m quite excited about how the proximity of the building to the cricket oval will allow some absolutely amazing views through the building straight on to the cricket ground.”
–Jackie Gillies, conservation architect

“A real threat has been hanging over it for a long time … Thank God a few people knuckled down and saved it, and saved it in a way where everyone gets what they want.”
–John Blennerhasset, great-grandson of Percy Sargood

Read more + architectural graphics

### ODT Online Sat, 4 Dec 2010
When the world came to Dunedin
If Dunedin’s leaders today announced they were going to stage an expo over 6.5ha and attract more than 3 million visitors, locals might think they were dreaming. But that’s exactly what happened in 1925 and the former Logan Park art gallery is a reminder. The gallery is the sole surviving building from the 1925-6 New Zealand and South Seas Exhibition, being the only structure built of permanent materials, for insurance reasons.
Read more

### ODT Online Sat, 4 Dec 2010
Sargoods’ gallery gift in memory of Gallipoli sacrifice
By Kim Dungey
The former Logan Park art gallery owes its survival to a wealthy Dunedin couple and events at Gallipoli. It was at Chunuk Bair that 22-year-old Lieutenant Cedric Rolfe Sargood, of the Otago Battalion, went missing in action in August 1915. A little more than a decade later, his parents, Percy and Lucy Sargood, approached the company which had staged the New Zealand and South Seas Exhibition with an offer to buy the exhibition’s art gallery for £4000. They then donated it to the city as a public art gallery in memory of their son.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

23 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Design, Economics, Heritage, Inspiration, Media, Museums, Name, New Zealand, NZHPT, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Tourism, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

Compromise can be painful and empowering for Heritage: DCC on Former Art Gallery

Dunedin City Council
Media Release

DCC Reveals Plans For Old Art Gallery

The DCC is to apply for a Resource Consent which would allow it to modify the old Art Gallery building at Logan Park.

The Council wants to extend the size of the adjacent University Oval cricket ground to Test status and a Resource Consent to remove part of the old Gallery is required to facilitate this.

The Resource Consent option, which is an alternative to original proposals to demolish or relocate the complex, has been discussed with NZHPT whose stance is “supportive of” the modifications outlined in the application.

Part of the application, which has been described as satisfying the needs of both DCC and NZHPT and the various stakeholders by preserving most of the original building on its 1925 site, would also involve significant changes to the Sargood Wing, which was a later addition at the northern end of the old Art Gallery.

The building has been the subject of a Conservation Assessment, the main elements of which will be incorporated into a plan to guide the project and its future management.

The modification will assist Otago Cricket who will gain a playing area which meets the requirements for fixtures against all the major Test cricket playing countries. The new ground will have similar dimensions to the Basin Reserve in Wellington.

The Resource Consent application is proposed to be lodged by the DCC on Thursday 1 April 2010.

Contact DCC on 477 4000

Last reviewed: 23 Mar 2010 1:00pm

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

13 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Construction, Design, Economics, Politics, Project management, Site, Sport, Town planning, Urban design

Logan Park Redevelopment: Compromise for Old Art Gallery

### ODT Online Thu, 19 Nov 2009
Art gallery demolition on agenda
By David Loughrey
Demolition of part of the former art gallery at Logan Park appears to be getting closer, as behind-closed-doors negotiations reach their conclusion. The Otago Daily Times understands the Dunedin City Council is planning partial demolition of the former art gallery, with bays at the end of the building by the University Oval to go.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

7 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, DCC, Design, Economics, Heritage, Media, Name, New Zealand, NZHPT, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

Former Logan Park Art Gallery talks

This week (ODT 5.10.09), reporter Chris Morris highlighted the Dunedin City Council proposal to remove the former art gallery building from the edge of the University Oval cricket ground in Dunedin. Councillors attending the community development committee meeting on Tuesday considered a report on the removal of the former gallery building in the closed section of the meeting. ODT Link

Note: Removal of the building is only one of the options on the council table.

Let’s not forget that current use of Logan Park itself includes active and passive recreation; this should not be lost sight of in any new development plans for ‘organised sport’ at the park.

Further, there’s no good reason to cut down the avenue of mature trees on Logan Park Drive.

Maintaining a watching brief… After all, this council of its own volition suddenly ‘closed’ a public road (again) this week – John Wilson Ocean Drive – upsetting citizens. The story broke on Channel 9 news on 6 October, with follow up the next day in Otago Daily Times.

Oh, and… A fence at Lawyers Head? Get real. What about coastal landscape values – I’ll say it, views to die for must be maintained and access not obstructed.

****

Entry on Heritage New Zealand’s List:

Exhibition Art Gallery (Former)
40 Logan Park Drive, DUNEDIN

List No: 2149

Registration Type: Historic Place – Category I
Region: Otago Region
Date Registered: 30/06/2006
City/District Council: Dunedin City Council

Other Names: Dunedin Art Gallery, Dunedin Public Art Gallery (Former), Logan Park Art Gallery, New Zealand and South Seas Exhibition Art Gallery (Former), NZ and South Seas Exhibition Art Gallery (Former), Old Art Gallery

Status Explanation: Review of registration confirmed BD2006/06/24.

Links: http://whc.unesco.org/archive/advisory_body_evaluation/1131.pdf – Royal Exhibition Building Australia No.1131, p.20

Brief History: The Exhibition Art Gallery was built as the art gallery for the 1925 New Zealand and South Seas International Exhibition in Dunedin. The World Fairs and Exhibitions were among the largest gatherings of people of all time, and they ranked amongst the most important events held in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Most exhibition buildings and sites were designed to be temporary, and there are, therefore, relatively few structures remaining. The Gallery appears to be the only surviving in situ exhibition building from any of the exhibitions held in New Zealand, and is also a significant survivor in the international history of exhibitions. This gives the Gallery outstanding historical significance.

The Gallery was designed by prominent Dunedin architect Edmund Anscombe (1874-1948). Anscombe was the originator of the idea to hold the exhibition in Dunedin, and was appointed official architect to the Exhibition committee in June 1924. Anscombe designed and supervised the lay out and construction of all seven of the exhibition pavilions. The building was symmetrically laid out with a large central exhibition hall from which two ambulatory circuits via the ten smaller galleries on either side of it were accessed. Each gallery was linked to its neighbour via decorative plaster archways.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

1 Comment

Filed under Architecture, Business, DCC, Design, Economics, Heritage, Museums, New Zealand, NZHPT, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Tourism, Town planning, University of Otago, Urban design, What stadium