Tag Archives: FIFA

Clarke and Dawe: Slush funds… and footie bookings

ClarkeAndDawe Published on Jun 25, 2014

Clarke and Dawe: The Title of This Item Was Deemed to be Freighted and Has Been Removed
“Denny Kistmee, Slush Fund Consultant” Originally aired on ABC TV: 26/06/2014

****

ClarkeAndDawe Published on Jun 18, 2014

Clarke and Dawe – International Sport is Open for Business
“Arthur Swissbank, Senior Protocols Advisor to FIFA” Originally aired on ABC TV: 19/06/2014

http://www.mrjohnclarke.com
http://www.twitter.com/mrjohnclarke
http://www.facebook.com/ClarkeAndDawe

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

2 Comments

Filed under Business, DCC, DVL, DVML, Economics, Events, Fun, Hot air, Media, Name, NZRU, ORFU, People, Politics, Project management, Sport, Stadiums, What stadium

NZRU ‘hustles’ towns and cities to build stadiums

What happens to our cathedrals, the large stadiums found in every major centre, if we lose faith?

### stuff.co.nz Last updated 05:00 14/06/2014
Sport
What about the state of New Zealand stadiums?
By Matt Nippert
[Excerpts from a longer article…] The covered 31,000-seat Forsyth Barr Stadium in Dunedin, constructed in time for the 2011 Rugby World Cup, may be the newest major sporting facility in the country but has already proved the most controversial. The bulk of its $224 million construction cost came from Dunedin City Council, but ongoing costs to ratepayers have caused considerable angst. Ratepayers were forced into a $2.3m bailout in May, and are mulling whether a permanent annual subsidy will be required to keep it running.

Getting to grips with exactly how much stadiums cost is a tricky exercise. Construction has often been piecemeal, with grandstands redeveloped or rebuilt over time, blurring total capital expenditure. And determining operational costs – whether stadiums require ongoing contributions by ratepayers – is further complicated by many facilities being run from within city councils or by council-controlled organisations. This makes the extraction of a discrete set of accounts, most notably in Dunedin and Waikato, an impossibility.

Analysis of accounts for Wellington and Auckland, run by dedicated trusts and two of the most transparent stadiums, shows that break-even is realistically the best case.

At New Zealand Rugby headquarters, chief executive Steve Tew broadly agrees that the glory days [of attendance at games] are over. Viewers watching broadcasts of a game have supplanted punters going through stadium turnstiles.

But there is one niche where the faith of the rugby faithful remains strong: All Blacks tests. Hosting the national team is often the only time stadiums up and down the country reach capacity.

While great for New Zealand Rugby coffers, Massey University’s Sam Richardson says the All Blacks have warped stadium construction priorities. “It’s an absolutely huge detriment. If you’re building a stadium where the financial viability year to year relies on an All Blacks test, there’s no question New Zealand Rugby plays a massive part in whether these facilities are going to be used to their potential,” he says.

Canterbury University economist Eric Crampton says building capacity for a solitary annual All Black test is akin to “buying a six-bedroom house just in case both sets of grandparents come to visit at the same time”. Crampton says the proliferation of large loss-making stadiums, both in New Zealand and worldwide, has been mainly because of the economic equivalent of hustling. “Sporting teams have been able to convince councils all over the place – and have been able to play them off against each other by threatening to move – to build excessive stadiums.
Read more

****

“Fifa, like the International Olympic Committee, is widely regarded as corrupt. In that, it reflects our flawed species; while capable of fabulous feats, a dark side lurks.”

### ODT Online Sat, 14 Jun 2014
Editorial: Revelling in sport
OPINION As Dunedin and the South gear up for the excitement of tonight’s rugby test in the city, a sporting event in another league entirely kicked off yesterday.
Read more

Garrick Tremain – 14 June 2015

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

87 Comments

Filed under Business, Construction, DCC, Economics, Geography, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Tourism, Town planning, Urban design

Sao Paulo: Arena Corinthians (Itaquerão) crane collapse

Arena Corinthians - Itaquerao [@FutebolnoPonto] 2Arena Corinthians – Itaquerão Costing $360 million, the Sao Paulo stadium will seat nearly 70,000 people. The crane collapse may have been caused by unstable soil after a rain storm. [Image: @FutebolnoPonto]

### 3News Thursday 28 Nov 2013 5:41a.m.
Two dead in World Cup stadium collapse
By Tales Azzoni and Stan Lehman
Part of the stadium that will host the 2014 World Cup opener collapsed Wednesday, killing two workers and aggravating already urgent concerns Brazil won’t be ready for soccer’s signature tournament.
The accident at the Arena Corinthians, known locally as the Itaquerao, could hardly have come at a worse time – just a week ahead of the draw that will determine the tournament’s schedule and with the top names in soccer all descending on Brazil.
The stadium was nearly finished before the collapse, which occurred when a construction crane crashed into a 500-ton metal structure. That structure then cut through the outer walls of the venue, destroying part of the outside of the building and rows of seats and slamming into a giant LED panel that runs across the stadium’s facade. AP
Read more + Video

Arena Corinthians - Itaquerao [businessinsider.com.au] aerialArena Corinthians - Itaquerao [businessinsider.com.au] detail 1[Images: businessinsider.com.au]

[updated] ### 3News Thursday 28 Nov 2013 8:47p.m.
Deadly crash puts light on Brazils WCup troubles
With one thunderous crash, Brazil’s troubled preparations for the World Cup are thrown in the spotlight for all the wrong reasons, just as soccer gears up for the high-profile setting of the schedule for next year’s big event.
The newspaper Estado de S. Paulo said public prosecutors had previously pointed to 50 irregularities at the venue, including some related to emergency drills. AP
Read more

****

### 3News Thursday 28 Nov 2013 10:34a.m.
Past problems at Brazil World Cup, Olympic Stadiums
A look at problems suffered by some of the stadiums being built or renovated for the 2014 Football World Cup and the 2016 Olympics.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

1 Comment

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, Design, Geography, Media, Name, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Urban design

Ratepayers, another windfall —Fifa under-20 World Cup 2015

Otago Stadium 1

Fifa NZ U20 WC logo [tourismnewzealand.com]### ODT Online Thu, 15 Aug 2013
Dunedin to host FIFA U-20 World Cup games
Dunedin will be a host venue for the biggest football tournament to be held in New Zealand.
Forsyth Barr Stadium will host games in the 2015 Fifa world under-20 tournament, organisers confirmed today. Auckland, Hamilton, Christchurch, New Plymouth, Wellington and Whangarei are also hosting games. Read more

Wow. The Spooks have worked overtime on this release, fired by opinion (and even a footnote of purpose) —not, ratepayer budgets.

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Dunedin Confirmed as a Host City for FIFA’s Second Biggest Tournament

This item was published on 15 Aug 2013.

With just under two years until kick off in the first match of the FIFA U-20 World Cup New Zealand 2015, FIFA and the New Zealand Football Local Organising Committee (LOC) have confirmed that Dunedin will play a significant role in the tournament.
Dunedin will host seven matches altogether, including a Round of 16 clash (the round before the quarter finals). All of the games will be played under the roof of Otago Stadium.
The naming of Dunedin as a host city followed a robust selection process where a total of 7 successful cities were named – Auckland, Wellington, Hamilton, Whangarei, Christchurch and New Plymouth.
Mayor of Dunedin Dave Cull is delighted the city will be participating in one of world football’s premier events.

“This is a wonderful outcome for the city and will be a great opportunity to showcase Dunedin to players, officials and supporters. Hosting 2011 Rugby World Cup matches in Dunedin means we are well equipped to deal with another high-profile international event. We can build on what we learnt hosting RWC matches and will be working closely with Football South and other stakeholders to ensure we get the maximum effect from the event and give visitors to the city a fantastic welcome.”

Mr Cull says the city has negotiated excellent value for the ratepayers with FIFA although the terms of the arrangement will remain confidential at this time.

“Due to the considerable work done by staff, we are confident it is a sound investment.”

Darren Burden, CEO, Dunedin Venues, the company which operates Otago Stadium, is thrilled Dunedin will feature in the tournament.

“Our Stadium is an ideal football venue for players and spectators alike and, with the internationally significant scale of this event, it’s a privilege to host top class football under the roof. This announcement reinforces the importance of having an outstanding venue as a draw card to host international sporting events. I think we’re all in for a sporting spectacular in 2015.”

As for Rugby World Cup 2011, Dunedin’s Stadium will be known as Otago Stadium for the lead up to and duration of the tournament to meet FIFA’s clean sponsorship rules.
Matthew Holdridge, Chair of the FootballSouth Board, says, “On behalf of all the players, supporters, and administrators in the FootballSouth region, I would like to express our delight at the fantastic news Dunedin will host seven matches at the 2015 FIFA U-20 World Cup.

“This is a major event for our Football Federation, one that, if we missed, may not have come around again in our lifetime. I know our football community is keen to be part of this event. FootballSouth will be working closely with FIFA and the Local Organising Committee to ensure our 7,800 affiliated football members and the wider community gets as many opportunities as possible to engage with the event and the teams playing at Otago Stadium.”

Dave Beeche, CEO FIFA U-20 World Cup 2015, is full of praise for all of the cities that were involved in the bidding process and feels that having access to a covered stadium adds significantly to the tournament.

“We’d like to thank all of the cities that put in a bid to host matches for their work over the last year to get to this point. The feedback from FIFA was very positive following the recent site inspection tour and they are looking forward to a highly successful tournament in 2015. With the tournament being played during the winter, it’s fantastic to have a full covered stadium as it means we’ll have ideal pitch conditions and visitors will have another good reason to head south. The FIFA delegates were very impressed with Otago Stadium and see the roof as a major benefit given the timing of the tournament. To have seven stunning venues locked in nearly two years out from the first match gives us a great planning timeframe and we’ll use all of it to ensure that a standout event is delivered. This tournament has a huge global following and that’s the opportunity we have with this event – to deliver exposure for New Zealand and host regions, both directly during the tournament and via a massive international television audience. With the world’s best footballing talent on display and stadiums full of colour, noise, and atmosphere, it will be a new experience for New Zealand that everyone will want to be a part of.”

Altogether the tournament will host 24 national teams, include 52 matches, and will run for three weeks from 30 May until 20 June 2015. This is during the local football season, which will provide a great opportunity for the sport’s large youth playing base to be inspired by the world’s best players. With an average of three goals scored per game in the last three FIFA U-20 World Cup tournaments this will be dynamic, exciting football at its best.
The tournament will be broadcast to more than 100 countries and a global television audience of more than 170 million people[1], providing exposure for the tournament, the host cities, and New Zealand on a massive scale. It is estimated more than 7,000 overseas fans will pour into New Zealand for the tournament and to support their teams.

FIFA Factsheet (PDF, 188.2 KB)

[1] Based on the FIFA U-20 World Cup Columbia 2011 Television Audience Report produced for FIFA TV by KantraSport

Contact Mayor of Dunedin on 477 4000.

DCC Link

Related Posts and Comments:
25.10.12 Council bid lacks cost/benefit analysis: Fifa under-20 World Cup 2015
7.12.11 D Scene: Cull and councillors captured by Fifa bid, it will cost

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: tourismnewzealand.com – NZ U20 WC logo

82 Comments

Filed under Business, DCC, Economics, Events, Geography, Hot air, Media, New Zealand, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Tourism, What stadium

Council bid lacks cost/benefit analysis: Fifa under-20 World Cup 2015

Interesting. DCC and DVML aren’t sharing information on the cup bid. General manager Sue Bidrose looks like a fool again (perhaps she is), and Darren is Darren. Nevertheless, all councillors are responsible for the lack of a full cost/benefit analysis.

### ODT Online Thu, 25 Oct 2012
Code clash with cash implications
By Chris Morris
The Highlanders could be kicked for touch, and the company running the Forsyth Barr Stadium left out of pocket, if Dunedin secures a share of hosting rights for the Fifa under-20 World Cup in 2015. That was because Fifa required exclusive use of all tournament venues, beginning 10 days before each venue’s first match and continuing until a day after the last match, tournament organising committee interim project manager Peter O’Hara said. That could mean a clash between Fifa’s tournament and the Super 15 rugby competition at stadiums around New Zealand, as the two tournaments would overlap.

[Dunedin Venues Management Ltd chief executive Darren Burden] did not yet know the details of Dunedin’s bid, which was being handled by the Dunedin City Council, but hoped “sensible solutions could be found”.

The council was expected to contribute up to $450,000 towards Fifa’s tournament costs if its bid was successful, but council city strategy and development manager Sue Bidrose said that was if the city won the right to host a number of matches, including the final. The cost could be reduced if the city’s bid was only partially successful, but the true cost – including lost revenue if other stadium events were disrupted – was not known, she said.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

77 Comments

Filed under Business, DCC, DVML, Economics, Events, Media, Name, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums

D Scene: Cull and councillors captured by Fifa bid, it will cost

Front page news, the mayor fancies spending more ratepayer funds on stadium events (he’s smiling, after all). Like Rugby World Cup, though, the events will deliver profits to very few local businesses and almost nothing to council coffers. Your mayor isn’t an economist, it’s hard sticking to a household budget.

Register to read D Scene online at
http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

### D Scene 7-12-11
“Having a ball?” (page 1)
Dunedin is planning an ambitious pitch for games in the 2015 Fifa under-20 Football World Cup, Mayor Dave Cull says – including a bid to host the final. See page 3. #bookmark

Millions would see Dunedin (page 3)
By Wilma McCorkindale
The tournament will bring 24 countries and 52 games to New Zealand and is the most prestigious international football event next to the senior men’s FIFA World Cup. The tournament is broadcast to about 500 million television viewers in more than 200 countries […] Category 1 hosting could cost the city up to $1 million in cash and “in kind” resources, such as traffic and crowd management, infrastructure, and services.
{continues} #bookmark

****

“This further bailout of the ORFU, a private entertainment business, is an abuse of ratepayer funds.” -Bev Butler

New stadium agreement another ORFU bailout (page 4)
By Wilma McCorkindale
Ratepayer advocate Bev Butler is outraged the Dunedin City Council was left out of contract discussions between its venue company and the Otago Rugby Football Union [ORFU]. Councillors able to be contacted this week confirmed they had no idea Dunedin Venues Management Ltd (DVML) and the ORFU were combining services at Forsyth Barr Stadium […] Most contacted supported the contract, saying it made commercial sense.
{continues} #bookmark

****

Editorial: City needs return on investments in rugby (page 7)
Mike Houlahan says “it stretches belief that rugby follows on from rubbish and roading as core business for council”.
{continues} #bookmark

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

10 Comments

Filed under DCC, DVML, Economics, Geography, Media, People, Politics, Project management, Site, Sport, Stadiums

New stadium frenzy (heaven)

In the wake of the decision to hand the 2018 and 2022 world cups to virtual footballing minnows (with all respect to Russia), the race is on to design and build a plethora of new stadia.

Thankfully The Telegraph from the UK has a nice feature on the stadiums either under development, redevelopment or still in the planning stage.

Firstly, FIFA Football World Cup 2018 Russia

and

are just two examples from the winning Russian bid.

While these are from the Qatari winning bid for the FIFA 2022 winning bid (basically the bid I was hoping that was going to Australia).

As soon as I get a chance to get more details of these stadium projects I’ll post more.

Post by Paul Le Comte

18 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Construction, Design, Economics, Geography, Inspiration, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Urban design