Tag Archives: Entrepreneurship

Fossil fuel divestment : Council fails to recognise opportunities

Election Year : This post is offered in the public interest. -Eds

Received from John Evans
Fri, 29 Apr 2016 at 7:54 p.m.

█ Subject: Why the Dunedin council’s decision on non investment and non support of oil investment is wrong

It is noticeable that the decision makers on the DCC who have made the decision on non oil investment are unaffected by their decision, because they and employees of the council are on fixed salaries, but the ratepayers, business men and women, and working persons in the city are severely compromised.

### theguardian.com Wed 18 June 2014 10.24 BST
Aberdeen, the oil city where boom and bust happen at the same time
By Peter Geoghegan – Aberdeen
OPINION The taxi driver swings his brand-new BMW out of Aberdeen train station. Behind him the sleek glass-fronted £250m Union Square shopping centre, with its Apple store and Hugo Boss shop, glistens in the afternoon sunshine. “Welcome to the oil capital of Europe,” he says with a smile. As we drive past Aberdeen harbour, crowded with cargo ships, he talks about his grandson. A multinational oil company is paying the 17-year-old £12,000 a year to study mechanical engineering at college. He will graduate into a guaranteed job. “He’ll be on £100,000 by the time he’s 25,” the cabbie says confidently. Such stories are common in oil-rich Aberdeen. The Granite City boasts the highest concentration of millionaires in the UK. Three-star hotel rooms can cost upwards of £370 a night. In a city of 220,000, unemployment is just 2% and average annual salaries more than £39,000, around £12,000 more than the UK average in 2013.
Read more

DUNEDIN The citizens should dump their elected body just for failing to recognise possible opportunities for their ratepayers.

This council would not have allowed gold mining had it been in charge in the 1860s.

[ends]

ABERDEEN : Granite City —the buildings sparkle after a rainfall.
aberdeen [isbreading.org] 1

Aberdeen City Garden
Revitalising the centre and reconnecting the city to its natural landscape. http://www.dsrny.com/projects/aberdeen

aberdeen abcitaerial [onsitereview.ca]
aberdeen Learning Garden [metalocus.es] 1

Diller Scofidio + Renfro selected to transform the centre of Aberdeen
archdaily.com Jan 2012
Aberdeen City Garden Trust has announced Diller Scofidio + Renfro (DS+R) as winner of the international design competition. The New York City based firm will be working with the Scottish practice Keppie Design and Philadelphia landscape architects OLIN. The £140m City Garden Project will radically transform the center, raising the nineteenth-century Union Terrace Gardens and covering over the “unattractive” Denburn dual carriageway and railway line.

Evening Express Uploaded on Feb 15, 2012
Walkthrough of Aberdeen City Garden Project
http://www.eveningexpress.co.uk/Article.aspx/2642056
Residents are being given a bird’s-eye view of the planned Aberdeen City Gardens in a new video. Swooping around the pathways of Aberdeen’s Granite Web, the visitor is taken on a two-minute tour of the green spaces, flower beds and woodland.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Business, DCC, Democracy, Dunedin, Economics, Finance, Geography, Heritage, Infrastructure, Innovation, Media, New Zealand, Offshore drilling, People, Politics, Public interest, Resource management, Tourism, Town planning, Transportation, Travesty, Urban design, What stadium

Comics: The Oatmeal

The Oatmeal - making things 2014 (1)15.11.12 http://theoatmeal.com/comics/making_things

The Oatmeal (2)

Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Oatmeal
Twitter: Follow Matthew Inman @Oatmeal
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theoatmeal

### SmartPlanet.com 14 Oct 2012
Q&A: The Oatmeal’s Matthew Inman talks crowdfunding, creativity
By Molly Petrilla
Creator of the popular humour website The Oatmeal, Matthew Inman recently turned his talents toward philanthropic crowdfunding, raising $1.37 million for a new Nikola Tesla Museum. Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr
… with thanks to another of my nearby inspirations :)

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NHNZ development mode (new business, markets)

“It’s like the next version of NHNZ. It’s like NHNZ version 3.1 in a lot of ways, version one being when we were part of TVNZ, version two being when [former managing director] Michael Stedman took over and gave us a new lease of life, and this is another step.” –Kyle Murdoch, NHNZ

### ODT Online Wed, 27 Nov 2013
Children’s TV for NHNZ
By Vaughan Elder
Dunedin’s NHNZ is preparing to take on the likes of Disney with the launch of its own international children’s television channel. NHNZ managing director Kyle Murdoch said, in preparation for the launch of the channel next February, 54 staff were hard at work in Dunedin producing content for it. About 40 were new staff who had joined the office since the middle of this year.
Read more

● Michael Stedman, former managing director, retired at the beginning of this year.

NHNZ website (detail)Natural History New Zealand website [screenshot detail]

Wikipedia: NHNZ

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Cities: Organic renewal

St Joseph - Buchanan County Courthouse [commons.wikimedia.org]St Joseph -  Downtown cnr Francis St and North 4th St [commons.wikimedia.org] 1St Joseph - Downtown skyline 2006 [commons.wikimedia.org] 1St Joseph, Missouri

### Citiwire.net Fri, July 5, 2013
Organic Renewal: St Joe’s Story
By Roberta Brandes Gratz
In the mid- and late 1960s, while many cities and towns were still tearing their hearts out for the false promises of urban renewal, all sorts of people, young and old, saw the beauty, value and promise of gracious living in historic buildings in the places left behind by suburban development. From San Francisco to Louisville to Providence to Brooklyn to St Louis and beyond, urban pioneers stripped, cleaned and restored the irreplaceable artifacts of bygone eras of quality and taste.
Those pioneers were the vanguard of the regeneration of neighbourhoods and cities that, today, many people do not remember were considered a blighted lost cause. Washington’s Georgetown. Park Slope in Brooklyn. King William in San Antonio. The Garden District in New Orleans. The Victorian Districts of San Francisco and Savannah. Who remembers that those neighbourhoods were once considered “blighted,” over, finished?

Surely, this is the most compelling storyline of the second half of the last century. The rebirth of today’s thriving cities started with the rediscovery of yesterday’s discards. That, as they say, is history. But history has a funny way of repeating itself. Today, one finds examples of that organic renewal process re-emerging.

Many cities have lost more than what remains of the authentic architecture on which to build a new momentum. Miraculously, one that survives with an amazing rich legacy to work with is St Joseph, Mo.
Set on a bend in the Missouri River and almost equidistant from Kansas City and Omaha, St Joseph was a railroad, lumber and banking centre and, most importantly, the last full provisioning point for the Westward Expansion in the mid-nineteenth century. It’s the birthplace of the Pony Express, the site of Jesse James’ demise, home of Stetson Hat, Saltine crackers and Aunt Jemima.
St Joseph is still home to a diverse assortment of agriculture-related industry. The past and present combine to offer new opportunities, and a small but growing group of adventurous entrepreneurs appear to be present to lead the way, like the urban pioneers of 50 years ago.
Read more

● Roberta Brandes Gratz is an urban critic and author of The Battle For Gotham: New York In the Shadow of Robert Moses and Jane Jacobs, 2010, Nation Books.

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Dunedin - South Princes St (2007), watercolour by Elizabeth Gorden-Werner

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Grants Scheme for Central City Heritage Buildings

This item was published on 05 Jul 2013.

The DCC now has $90,000 available in grants for heritage building re-use projects in Princes Street and areas adjoining the Warehouse Precinct. Like the Warehouse Precinct scheme, this new grant scheme is focused on a specific geographic area to facilitate and expand the regeneration occurring there already. There has been good success with targeted incentive schemes in the Warehouse Precinct. Expanding into the areas around it recognises that the precinct is not an island, but is integrated with the areas around in and with the central city as a whole.

There is already some great work stirring regeneration in the area and it is important we are also poised to assist and encourage others to participate in this regeneration of the area south of the Octagon.

Applications can be made for support for a range of activities, from earthquake strengthening and facade restoration to assistance for businesses and creative industries in the area. The scheme allows building owners to build on the growing positive private sector re-use and investment in the area, such as the Chief Post Office, former BNZ and Standard Building restoration projects already or soon to be underway.

The scheme is supported by Resene Paints which is offering discounts on paint and free colour advice. Resene Otago Trade Representative Henry Van Turnhout says, “We are proud to be offering our support to another DCC area-based project, as we have for King Edward St and the Warehouse Precinct. We are also offering free assistance with colour selection as we recognise how greatly appropriate colour choice can influence the way a building – and an area – looks.”

Taking an area-based approach to regeneration and incentives encourages businesses and building owners to work together and to recognise the benefits for the entire area of re-using or improving their building.

Applications are open immediately, on a first come first served basis. Application forms will be sent to building owners, residents and businesses owners in the next week and are at www.dunedin.govt.nz/heritage

Last year’s Warehouse Precinct grants scheme supported 11 re-use projects in the area. Information about these is available at here.

Contact Glen Hazelton, DCC Policy Planner on 477 4000.

DCC Link
ODT: DCC boost for Princes St regeneration

Dunedin - Former Gresham Hotel IMG_9518 (2)Dunedin - Speight's IMG_0586 (2)Dunedin Central Fire Station, Castle St 2 [commons.wikimedia.org]Dunedin. In future years, the council plans to use this approach in other parts of the central city and beyond.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images: (from top) commons.wikimedia.org Tim Kiser – St Joseph, Missouri (2006): Buchanan County Courthouse, Downtown cnr Francis St and North 4th St, Downtown viewed from the east near cnr 10th and Charles. Dunedin: South Princes St (2007 watercolour by Elizabeth Gorden-Werner), former Gresham Hotel at Queens Gardens, Speight’s (Lion Breweries) on Rattray St; commons.wikimedia.org Benchill – Dunedin Central Fire Station, Castle St.

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Call for campaign on exports

The Chamber of Commerce says while exporting continues to be concentrated on commodity agriculture, New Zealand has many innovative and creative businesses with the potential to be successful global players.

### idealog.co.nz Friday 11 Nov 2011 at 9:29 am
Leadership
Call for government-business partnership to campaign on exports
By Idealog
The Chamber of Commerce is calling for the incoming government to rethink its approach to exports, joining forces with the private sector to campaign to sell more to the rest of the world. Spokesman Michael Barnett said the traditional focus of increasing exports of conventional merchandise goods needed to shift up the value chain to high-tech, knowledge-based products, the export of services and the returns from outward direct overseas investment. “We believe the best way to improve New Zealand’s export performance is for the incoming government to establish an innovation-focused government-business partnership tasked to lead a campaign to sell more to the world.”
Read more



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Kathryn Ryan interviews agribusiness pioneer George Harrison

BRILLIANT INTERVIEW (if Ryan didn’t interrupt)

### rnz.co.nz Wed 22 Jun 2011 10:06 AM
Nine To Noon with Kathryn Ryan
Agribusiness pioneer Sir Graeme Harrison
Newly-knighted founder and chair of meat company Anzco Foods, which has annual sales of more than $1.2 billion, making it one of New Zealand’s largest exporters. He is also a director of dairy co-operative Westland Milk Products and fishing firm Sealord.
Audio Ogg Vorbis MP3 (32′50″)

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Related:

[comment] 25.5.11
Prof Sir Paul Callaghan, physicist, entrepreneur, and New Zealander of the Year, was in Dunedin yesterday. Link

Sir Paul’s vision for New Zealand is a knowledge-based economy producing high-quality exports that do not strain the environment. Looking after the environment created the kind of society in which highly skilled people wanted to live. It helped reverse the brain drain, and attracted people from overseas. -Otago Daily Times

[post] 22.5.11
Audacious idea: New Zealand X-Prize Environmental and Energy

Hyperfactory founder Derek Handley said $1b is less than a tenth of what the current government has committed to infrastructure projects in the next few years and about the same amount spent bailing out South Canterbury Finance investors. It is also “about twice as much as the amount we hope to lose by hosting the Rugby World Cup”, he said and about the same as our bill for six weeks of imported oil. -Sunday Star Times

[post] 2.4.11
At last, PRODUCTIVITY is?

The Productivity Commission’s inquiry into international freight transport services is of high importance to Otago and Southland, Otago Chamber of Commerce chief executive John Christie said yesterday. -Otago Daily Times

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Audacious idea: New Zealand X-Prize Environmental and Energy

Kea “New Zealand, New Thinking” event, New York

### stuff.co.nz Last updated 05:00 22/05/2011
$1b prize plan for NZ’s future
By Rob O’Neill – Sunday Star Times
The Government is being urged to invest in new strategies to lift the country out of the economic mire, with one successful entrepreneur suggesting it invest $1 billion in future energy technologies through an audacious prize.
New Zealand needs to build a country around the promises of tomorrow, not the legacies of yesterday, Hyperfactory founder Derek Handley told expatriate Kiwis in New York last week as the government announced the partial sale of many state-owned energy assets.

Handley said $1b is less than a tenth of what the current government has committed to infrastructure projects in the next few years and about the same amount spent bailing out South Canterbury Finance investors. It is also “about twice as much as the amount we hope to lose by hosting the Rugby World Cup”, he said and about the same as our bill for six weeks of imported oil.

Read more

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Dunedin company iVisit develops free iPhone app

Mobile tourism information service

### ODT Online Wed, 29 Dec 2010
Are phones the new guidebooks?
By Hamish McNeilly
Guidebooks may be a thing of the past, thanks to an innovative Dunedin company which turns smartphones into a mobile tourism information service. Smartphone applications represented the most exciting possibilities for the fast moving tourism industry since the introduction of maps and guidebooks, AA Tourism online general manager Roger Slater said.

At the forefront of this technology was Dunedin company iVisit, which has spent nearly a year creating the smartphone application XplrNZ.

Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
23.12.10 ODT on the “the phoenix of design and innovation”
12.11.10 FREE wireless internet in Dunedin …now that’s wicked!
12.11.10 WIC NZ Ltd announces Innovate 100 programme
11.10.10 The Distiller + WIC — Dunedin entrepreneurs
28.9.10 AugmentedReality @ Dunedin
25.8.10 New hotspot in Anzac Ave, Dunedin

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WIC NZ Ltd announces Innovate 100 programme

Media Release
Dunedin, New Zealand. 12 November 2010.

Wireless Internet Connections (WIC NZ Ltd) announces Innovate 100 programme.

WIC NZ Ltd formally announced today the availability of its Innovate 100 programme. This initiative is aimed at assisting the growing population of Internet startup companies and creative industries in Dunedin in the process of developing innovative and compelling online content to be delivered to consumers in New Zealand and the rest of the world. WIC NZ pioneered low-cost, fixed-rate commercial and residential connections with no data caps or excess data charges, removing barriers to entry and other disincentives to use amongst the user population.

New and innovative ideas on the Internet take time to evolve and mature and can gain critical mass only through engagement with a wide audience. Where there is a high barrier or cost of entry to providing content, often these ideas do not have time or opportunity to flourish. Innovate 100 is a solution to reduce those barriers and retain creative, innovative thinkers within the Dunedin community.

Innovate 100 provides an online digital content producer with access capacity of up to 100Mbps of outbound Internet traffic. The access points for this service are open to existing and new customers at high-capacity fibre-connected nodes in Dunedin city. Content served via Innovate 100 is peered nationally at all of the neutral Internet exchanges to facilitate rapid access from all consumers regardless of ISP.

Innovate 100 is a step beyond existing service offerings and takes advantage of increased capabilities and under-utilised outbound capacity on our Internet backhaul. We believe that with the advent of Ultra-Fast Broadband (UFB), a robust content and hosting ecosystem needs to evolve to meet future demand. Innovate 100 is the first step in stimulating local content providers to experiment with new ideas that will scale up to meet this demand. Stu Fleming, Managing Director and Chief Technical Officer of WIC NZ says: “This is the lowest cost of entry that we can think of to enable Dunedin-based content providers to be able to implement their ideas and get their online content to the world. All you need is a server and a network cable.”

Innovate 100 is available to new and existing WIC NZ customers and associates of The Distiller. “WIC NZ has been a long-time champion for Dunedin’s bootstrapped technology entrepreneurs through its unconditional support of The Distiller since its inception,” says Jason Leong, co-founder of The Distiller and PocketSmith. “Innovate 100 is a clear example of the forward thinking and action that will uplift Dunedin’s profile as a cradle for entrepreneurship, and we’re very excited to be a part this remarkable opportunity. We look forward to partnering with WIC NZ in building the next generation of products and services that will be consumed over the broadband of tomorrow.”

The Innovate 100 programme will operate for 12 months from January 2011. It is available initially at WIC NZ’s hosting centre at Cresswell St, Dunedin and within the Centre for Innovation at St David Street, Dunedin. WIC NZ is a Layer 2 provider with Flute Networks and can extend Innovate 100 at cost to reach any location within the Flute Networks coverage area.

WIC NZ Ltd is a Dunedin-based, privately-owned independent Internet Service provider operating since 2004. For more details regarding these announcements, please contact:

Stu Fleming, Managing Director (WIC NZ Ltd)
Tel: 0508 123 942 or 021 993 125

Wireless Internet Connections
PO Box 13146, Green Island, Dunedin
Email: stewart@wic.co.nz

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FREE wireless internet in Dunedin …now that’s wicked!

Media Release
Dunedin, New Zealand. 12 November 2010.

Wireless Internet Connections (WIC NZ) Ltd launches free wireless access in Dunedin.

WIC NZ Ltd introduces its free wireless service in Dunedin under the Wicked Networks brand. Wicked Networks has been operating since March 2010 and has over 2300 registered users regularly using the network of around 30 Wi-Fi (802.11N) hotspots across the city. The service provides a registration-based, advertising-supported portal with high-capacity access to local services and shared Internet capacity upstream.

Wicked Networks was officially launched by Clare Curran MP at 5:30pm Friday 12 November 2010, at the Centre for Innovation, 87 St David Street, Dunedin.

Wicked Networks provides an easy, low-cost means of access to information and services by locals, business users and visitors alike. The coverage, capacity and user base of the service are all scalable at incremental cost. Wicked Networks has grown at the rate of 100 new users per week and delivers around 150GB of monthly traffic.

The Wicked Networks infrastructure provides an open-access platform to support services operated by multiple service providers. WIC NZ maintains robust interconnect arrangements with other local operators for high-capacity data exchange at low cost.

Wicked Networks is used by Otago Polytechnic to extend the range and coverage of their campus wireless network across the city. Wicked Networks is used to support the delivery of augmented reality content in a novel project supported by the Dunedin City Council lndustry Project Fund. Wicked Networks welcomes and encourages other operators to adopt the service and willingly engages with any third-party provider wishing to operate differentiated services on the open-access platform.

Wicked Networks addresses many issues that are commonly encountered for free wi-fi:
• securing the customer relationship via e-mail and text verification systems
• robust traffic management to reduce or eliminate unacceptable usage
• support for “access with payment” voucher codes at designated locations
• ability to cooperate with existing wireless providers.

The key to the success of this platform is the inclusiveness provided by the cooperative interconnect arrangements with other providers. Any service provider can broadcast their wireless service identifier (SSID) over the common infrastructure and have their traffic delivered at a designated exchange point. Usage of the Otago Polytechnic campus wireless service has more than doubled since the introduction of the additional coverage on Wicked Networks. The open access component was designed to stimulate innovation and we are delighted to see this happening already.

The costs of the Wicked Networks service are met by advertising revenue on the login and registration portal pages that appear in a Web browser, and from the interconnect arrangements with third-party providers.

For more information about Wicked Networks, please direct all enquiries to:

Stu Fleming
Managing Director, WIC NZ Ltd

Wicked Networks PO Box 13146, Green Island, Dunedin
Freecall: 0508 942 533 or 0508 WICKED
Email: info@wickednetworks.co.nz
www.wickednetworks.co.nz

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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The Distiller + WIC — Dunedin entrepreneurs

### ODT Online Sat, 9 Oct 2010
Minding others’ business
By Dene Mackenzie
For years, Dunedin has been grappling with ways to keep its best and brightest residents in the city. As parents have watched their children leave, many not to return, much handwringing by civic and community leaders has taken place. Business editor Dene Mackenzie talks to a group of young entrepreneurs prepared to do something about it, at their own cost.
Jason Leong, Francois Bondiguel and James Wigglesworth (all of Pocketsmith), Pierre-Emmanuel Perruchot de La Bussiere (iVisit) and Tim Calder (ParkHawk) are busy building their own businesses and careers but spend many hours each week encouraging a new generation to succeed.
The five men founded The Distiller, an independent non-profit project that focuses primarily on technology-related, pre-seed entrepreneurial ventures.
Read more

Facebook Photo: The Distiller
The Distiller co-founders (from left) Jason Leong, Tim Calder, Pierre-Emmanuel Perruchot de La Bussiere and Francois Bondiguel. Absent, James Wigglesworth. The Lab residents look on.

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### ODT Online Sat, 9 Oct 2010
Access provider has confidence in association
By Dene Mackenzie
Wireless internet company owner Stuart Fleming is quietly confident that his decision to provide massive amounts of free internet to The Distiller will pay dividends for him and Dunedin. Seven years ago, Mr Fleming started his company, WIC, at the Centre For Innovation in the suite next to where The Distiller now operates.
Read more

Related Posts:
28.9.10 AugmentedReality @ Dunedin
25.8.10 New hotspot in Anzac Ave, Dunedin

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Peter Lyons goes for broke, and if intending DCC councillors aren’t singing from the same hymn book they’re absolutely stuffed or not in the game AT ALL

### ODT Online Thu, 2 Sep 2010
Opinion: SCF collapse exposes NZ’s weaknesses
The failure of South Canterbury Finance once again exposes the glaring structural deficiencies in the New Zealand economy, writes Peter Lyons.

Adam Smith said, “there is much ruin in a nation”.

The failure of South Canterbury Finance is a stark wake-up call to the fundamental flaw in our economy. Our future prosperity will not hinge on welfare reforms or mining or compulsory savings or house prices. Our economic wellbeing will be determined by investing in productive activities that create saleable output and well-paid employment.

Our track record in this area is pathetic.
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D Scene features heritage/issues!

### D Scene 24-3-10 (front cover)
Car boot sale
A developer has chosen a novel way to make his point over [a] resource consent charge, and is selling his car to meet fees incurred restoring his Crawford St building. See p3. #bookmark

Possible closure strikes a chord (page 2)
By Mike Houahan
Once upon a time, in a galaxy far, far away, I earned a living writing about and reviewing rock ’n’ roll bands. Hence, the news that venerable Dunedin venue Sammy’s is on the brink of closure unless it is rapidly brought up to scratch to meet fire regulations struck a chord… Rock ’n’ roll has almost always been shunted into back-alley venues not fit for purpose, and venues and band managers have often colluded to stuff as many punters in as possible to maximise their revenue.
{continues} #bookmark

Fuming over charges (page 3)
By Wilma McCorkindale
Dunedin City Council may have another zoning battle on its hands, with building co-owner Lawrie Forbes fuming over consent charges for a redevelopment in moribund Crawford St. DCC zoned blocks from Queens Garden to the Oval large-scale retail in 1995, but Forbes believes the zone is not viable and has called for the council to review it.

Forbes said he and partner Craig McNaughton were restoring two of the four buildings on the site at present. Heritage values that had been lost over the century were being restored.

{continues} #bookmark

****

The following headline should not imply the building proposal has been granted resource consent. The application has yet to be notified.

Ex-gallery revamp approved (page 5)
By Wilma McCorkindale
One end of the old art gallery building at Logan Park is up for demolition – part of a $5m Dunedin City Council spend up at Logan Park…the last of the buildings which housed the [New Zealand and South Seas International Exhibition (1925-1926)] still in public ownership, is to lose some of its southern end to accommodate an extension to the University Oval sports ground.

‘[Paul]Hudson conceded council intially considered levelling the entire former art gallery as it grappled with the high cost* of the work required to retain it.’

{continues} #bookmark

*That was just ‘historical’ airyfairy bullshit from council on the cost of building retention.

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Bus tourists ‘not welcome’ (page 6)
By Wilma McCorkindale
City hotelier Peter Laing is questioning the city’s attitude towards bus tourists, after he recently paid a parking ticket slapped on a tour bus dropping tourists outside his hotel. Laing said the bus had no option but to park on one of two P5 zones the Dunedin City Council had erected outside the hotel…[he] claimed the new P5s were a remnant of the council’s u-turn on unpopular parking changes it introduced last year.
{continues} #bookmark

Register to read D Scene online at http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

User-pays system a ‘farce’ (page 8)
By Wilma McCorkindale
A Dunedin landlord is peeved at Dunedin City Council’s rules on rating of rental properties, saying its user-pays system was a farce. Darryl Jones was angry over an anomaly he identified between the rating method of his aging block of flats in Stuart St and on studio unit complexes in the city.
{continues} #bookmark

Talk: Dunedin on Dunedin
Your say: Letters to the Editor (page 9)
It didn’t happen overnight, by K Nordal Stene, North East Valley
The shocking state of Sammy’s, which necessitated ats immediate closure, has been a shock as well as a disappointment to many.
{continues} #bookmark

“The Building Act and the Fire Service Act place the obligation on the building owner to operate the building safely.”
-Trevor Tilyard, Dunedin Fire Service

Read the deputy chief fire officer’s full reply.

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The Invisible City (pages 11-12)
By Gavin Bertram
Ancient cities like London, Paris and Rome have layers of history beneath them. These hidden strata tell the story of their habitation by humans, of the rise and fall of empires, and of inexorable progress. Unlike those great metropolises, subterranean Dunedin can’t claim layers going back to Roman times and beyond. But what’s buried under the city is still a source of fascination, and a great window into its history.
{continues} #bookmark #bookmark

Biz: Crunching the numbers (page 20)
Starting it up
Upstart Business Incubator is in the business of getting people into business, but it also has to pay its own way. Mike Houlahan reports.
From its Princes St premises, Upstart has nine companies in “incubation” with five in pre-incubation – a process of readying firms for the full programme of mentoring and business assistance, which becomes available to fledgling entrepreneurs when they graduate to the incubator.
{continues} #bookmark

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D Scene – entrepreneurship skirts the stadium

### D Scene 4-11-09

Feast for workers (page 15)
By Michelle Sutton
A feast of burgers, bacon sandwiches, jobs and business opportunities are being served up and devoured at Dunedin’s stadium.
Otago Chamber of Commerce president John Christie said the stadium was a catalyst for private sector innovation, and people had seized entrepreneurial opportunities around its development.
{continues}

Council to talk about parking (page 5)
By Wilma McCorkindale
Parking recommendations to the Dunedin City Council are in, and an extraordinary meeting of the council will discuss them tomorrow.
The working party has released a nine-page report and map, and included two pages of recommendations for council to consider.
{continues}

Register to read D Scene online at http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

Talk: Dunedin on Dunedin (page 10)
Your say: Stadium stance

Letter by Bev Butler, Former President, Stop The Stadium Inc
Malcolm Farry states in D Scene (28/10/09), “Stadium – Game On”, that his one regret in the stadium debate has been the “personal attacks”.
{continues}

Letter by Bill Allen, Dunedin
Why is it that pro-stadium supporters state that the extra rates for the new stadium will only be on average $66 when they know, or should know in the positions that most of them hold, that this does not reflect the true additional rates increase.
{continues}

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