Tag Archives: Editorials

2Modern Blog | Modern Decor + Architecture + Interiors

2Modern (San Francisco) is a curator and brand ambassador for upscale modern furniture and modern lighting design. The website features new names on the design scene, trends, and weekly design editorials. 2Modern is an authorised dealer for leading brands including Knoll, Kartell, Artek, and Emeco; and contemporary lighting brands like FLOS, Louis Poulsen, FontanaArte, and Artemide. 2Modern also represents emerging design talent, like Blu Dot, James De Wulf, Gus*, LZF, and Skram.

The following samples appear in rough visual/formal order, not date order.
Follow links to view more images.

blog.2modern.com Tokyo Design Week - Spiral Lamp by Chris Kirby 1blog.2modern.com Tokyo Design Week - Spiral Lamp by Chris Kirby 2

Big in Japan
blog.2modern.com 21 Nov 2008
Is it wrong that out of all the great work showcased at Tokyo Design Week (2008), the product I’m most excited about is largely because it reminds me of my favourite childhood Christmas decorations? Designed by Canadian born, Tokyo based industrial designer Chris Kirby, the Spiral Lamp is an exploration of the interaction between light and matter, the impassable and the transmissive, flat and voluminous, and growing the complex from the simple. cont/

blog.2modern.com Tokyo Design Week - Spiral Lamp by Chris Kirby 3

blog.2modern.com New York City Fulton Center Subway ComplexNew York City’s Fulton Center Subway Complex
blog.2modern.com 12 Nov 2014
A decade in the making, at a cost of 1.4 billion dollars, the former Fulton Street station, irretrievably battered during the September 11, 2001 attacks, has risen from the ashes as Fulton Center, a sparkling convergence of 9 subway lines, designed and realized by a consortium of firms—headed by the architectural practice, Grimshaw, and the engineering and planning company, Arup.

blog.2modern.com 10 Loft Three Marias, Lisbon. AVA Architects. Photo Jose Campos-yatzerA Lisbon Home With A Bookish Twist
blog.2modern.com 24 Nov 2014
This meticulously refurbished Lisbon loft has plenty to recommend it—its decadent size and sumptuously ornamental (circa 1893) ceiling, for starters—but it’s the space-dividing open bookshelf that caught our eye. This spare-no-details renovation is by AVA Architects.

blog.2modern.com cTokyo Designers Week: Joint Installation by Vitra and Artek
blog.2modern.com 13 Nov 2014
Tokyo Designers Week (2014) was an occasion for Artek and Vitra to present their first joint installation since Vitra’s acquisition of the Finnish brand in 2013. Taking over the Light Box Studio exhibition space in Tokyo’s Aoyama neighbourhood, the installations merged the most iconic modern furniture, lighting, and decorative pieces.

blog.2modern Stockholm, Sweden - Miss Clara Hotel by Gert Wingårdh Architects,jpgSwede Sensation: Stockholm’s New Miss Clara Hotel
blog.2modern.com 2 Dec 2014
The city’s recently opened Miss Clara Hotel is a refurbishment courtesy of Gert Wingårdh Architects. The 1910 former all-girls school has been transformed into a 92-room hotel. The architects have a pitch-perfect instinct for exquisite balance: venerable with contemporary, original with new, dark with white, visual lightness with textural richness.

blog.2modern.com New York Stylish Breathing Rooms - BreatherpaperfactoryStylish Breathing Rooms From Breather
blog.2modern.com 10 Nov 2014
A year-old New York company has stolen a page familiar to cheap motel owners by renting rooms by the hour. Breather, the brainchild of Canadian and best-selling author Julien Smith, taps into the smart phone revolution—by turning unused spaces within a city into stylishly appointed modernist dens that offer welcoming respite to anyone with a smart phone, in search of a personal or professional rendezvous spot, or just in need of a long nap.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, Design, Innovation, Inspiration, Media, Name, People, Project management, Property, Site

Stadium: ODT editorial (1.2.14) —Garbutt debunks myths

### ODT Online Sat, 1 Feb 2014
Editorial: Business, or community asset?
The Dunedin City Council has been grappling with Forsyth Barr Stadium issues this past week. Fundamentally, they stem from the fact the economics of running the stadium are far worse than initially projected, an outcome that should surprise few. Many stadiums around the world struggle financially and Dunedin’s is no exception.
Read more

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Comment received from Russell Garbutt
Sunday, 2 February 2014 9:07 p.m.

The Editorial asks a question but answers it in the way to be expected, but unfortunately the arguments that the Editor uses are at best specious, and perhaps are nothing other than a rather obvious way to influence those that are now coming to grips with the review.

Let us debunk a few myths. I attended a number of meetings where Mr Farry presented and the rationale for the stadium altered dependent on the audience. I vividly recall a meeting of University staff held in Burns 1 chaired by the previous Vice Chancellor, Sir David Skegg, where Mr Farry said that it really was a stadium for the University. I attended other meetings where the stadium was to be built as a venue for regular and spectacular travelling rock shows. But it was always a professional rugby stadium.

The biggest elephant in this room is the myth that the stadium — whatever its purpose — was to be built debt free, and would require no ratepayer funding as it would generate a profit each and every year. For the ODT to compare this project with something like Moana Pool is plainly just stupid.

As others have pointed out, anyone can use Moana Pool at any time of day or a big portion of the night and they can do so on almost every day of the year. Thousands use it every day and it is truly a community amenity. The stadium is off limits and the only ones that can use it as they wish are the professional rugby teams.

Just why the ODT and the proponents of the stadium have not talked to Mr Farry, Sir Edgar, and the other members of the Carisbrook Stadium Trust (CST) to clarify with them exactly how the stadium was to be provided and run at NO ratepayer cost, is a mystery. Maybe it is because the ODT know that the promises made to do exactly that were nothing other than wishful thinking. But then again, at that crucial time, the CST informed us that two leading New Zealand accountancy firms supported the CST promises. Maybe instead of continuing to support the stadium, the ODT would be best to do some investigative work and find out just why these two firms believed that the CST was on sure ground.

While it might be hard for the ODT and other proponents of the stadium to have to admit that those that saw the actions of the CST in a different light to them and have been proven to be right in every area of concern, it is plainly ridiculous to now adopt the view that stadiums always lose money and so we shouldn’t be worried. That is not what was promised and that is not what has happened.

[ends]

Related Posts and Comments:
1.2.14 Stadium: ODT editorial (1.2.14) —“Palpable claptrap” says Oaten
29.1.14 Stadium: Brent Edwards cuts the grass (ODT 29.1.14)
27.1.14 Stadium: No 4 at interest.co.nz
25.1.14 Stadium: Some helped it along, or themselves!
24.1.14 Stadium: It came to pass . . .
17.1.14 Garrick Tremain: Our Stadium
26.11.13 Russell Garbutt: DCC, stadium failings
7.10.13 DCC councillors, no idea annual cost of owning, operating FB Stadium

For older posts, enter *stadium* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: dunedintv.co.nz – Russell Garbutt re-imaged by Whatifdunedin

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Filed under Business, Concerts, Construction, CST, DCC, DVL, DVML, Economics, Events, Media, Name, ORFU, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Town planning, University of Otago, Urban design, What stadium

Stadium: ODT editorial (1.2.14) —“Palpable claptrap” says Oaten

### ODT Online Sat, 1 Feb 2014
Editorial: Business, or community asset?
The Dunedin City Council has been grappling with Forsyth Barr Stadium issues this past week. Fundamentally, they stem from the fact the economics of running the stadium are far worse than initially projected, an outcome that should surprise few. Many stadiums around the world struggle financially and Dunedin’s is no exception.
Read more

****

Calvin Oaten [odt.co.nz] 7cComment received from Calvin Oaten
Submitted on 2014/02/01 at 1:56 pm

The ODT must have gotten a special on ‘lipstick’, because the Editor has really applied it thick and heavy on this “Pig”. I must go past and have another look at the shade. The last time I saw it was the same old ‘deathly pallor’, befitting its purpose in life.

He says: “Before too long the Stadium might well even struggle to meet operating costs, many of which are fixed.” What sort of statement is that, when it is acknowledged that the ratepayers at present pay $9.125m each year (pa) towards stadium related costs? Right there is a full barrel of ‘lipstick’.

● $144m of debt at 6% pa is $8.6m pa, Capital debt paid in 18 years (as Dave Cull claims) is $8m pa. Total $16.6m pa.

● Then there are the council contributions of $750,000 pa for community use subsidy, plus $400,000 pa events attraction fund. Total $17.75m pa.

● Then there are the Accumulated deficits of DVL and DVML amounting to $16.373m (see both annual reports ‘change in equity’ sections).

All up, the stadium hole is $34 million pa deep.

● Oh, and let’s not forget (as it often is) the High Performance Sports Centre, built on the NE side of the stadium. It was funded by the DCC on the basis of the HPSC paying all costs in order to clear the debt within ten years. This was reputed to cost the HPSC around $850,000 pa. Shortly after, a quiet motion was put to council that it should make an annual grant to HPSC of $850,000 pa, and it was readily approved by the council of the day. So there goes another bundle of ratepayers’ treasure.

We won’t even mention SH88 or the Carisbrook fiasco.

The Editor then says, “the councillors and the people of Dunedin will have to understand the stadium’s valuable place in the city’s extraordinary range of community – educational, cultural and sporting – facilities. It is a valuable community asset.”

Palpable claptrap. If the stadium suddenly disappeared in a puff of smoke (we wish) the only thing put out would be Super15, ITM cup and Test rugby. Nothing else, fullstop. Cricket, University Oval, Soccer, Caledonian Ground. All other sports, including lower grade rugby are well and truly catered for. Concerts, the Town Hall/Regent Theatre/Mayfair Theatre. Basketball and Netball, Edgar Centre/Lion Foundation. Swimming, Moana Pool.

Seriously, the stadium is an incredibly expensive arena foisted upon the citizens by a small, very determined group of ‘rugby nutters’, and that is the truth of the matter. The editorial in today’s ODT is nothing more than a ‘hollow attempt’ to put a case for the stadium as an asset, based on nothing but falsehoods and ‘mystical’ dreams. That it will mislead a lot of more deserving citizens is the shame of it all.

[ends]

Related Posts and Comments:
29.1.14 Stadium: Brent Edwards cuts the grass (ODT 29.1.14)
27.1.14 Stadium: No 4 at interest.co.nz
25.1.14 Stadium: Some helped it along, or themselves!
24.1.14 Stadium: It came to pass . . .
17.1.14 Garrick Tremain: Our Stadium
26.11.13 Russell Garbutt: DCC, stadium failings
7.10.13 DCC councillors, no idea annual cost of owning, operating FB Stadium

For older posts, enter *stadium* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: odt.co.nz – Calvin Oaten re-imaged by Whatifdunedin

2 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Design, DVL, DVML, Economics, Events, Media, Name, ORFU, People, Pics, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Town planning, University of Otago, Urban design, What stadium

ODT “stories” —parochial sun rays

Email received from Grahame Sydney
Saturday, 27 April 2013 1:22 p.m.

re ODT

My heart goes out to the loyal reporters at the ODT having to file garbage promotional stories extolling the fabulousness and phenomenal success of the Plastic Stadium, most of which “stories” are given front page treatment: since when did a “story” on the Aerosmith gear-haulage convoy rate as front page “news”, let alone the disgraceful banner headline and page-wide photograph of the band performing (“SILVER SPANGLED SPECTACLE” -Thursday 25 April) ? Is there no limit to the depths to which the editorial staff at ODT will sink in order to underwrite the foundering stadium, at the cost of editorial integrity ?

But while such transparent commercialism makes the opening of the ODT an increasingly difficult daily ritual, testing to the limits one’s own parochial tendencies, and the assault of full-page advertisements (7 in the first 22 page section today, not counting half-page ads…) makes the reading an habitual speed-read, is there any explanation for the strange appearance on page 12 today (27.3.13) of a colourful little child’s world picture of six happy Small People, one on a bike, one with a pet dog, two with a ball, all beaming innocently as yellow sun rays glow from a distant unseen horizon and five dinky, driverless vehicles crowd the streets ?

ODT 27.4.13 advertisement (page 12) 1

Below this merry fantasy is the exhortation: “Spend QUALITY TIME” at Dunedin’s intersections… there’s so much to see !”

No clue offered as to who is responsible for this mysterious insertion, nor why, what it might mean, or who it is aimed at. If it’s the DCC Traffic people, the message is highly questionable. Perhaps it’s the start of a new branding exercise, in the “It’s All Right Here” mould. If it’s a new campaign from the city’s tourist promotional wing, embarking on a bold new initiative to identify the REAL attractions of the town – I can see the entrance billboards and the bumper-stickers now: IGNORE THE HOTEL: COME AND EXPERIENCE OUR INTERSECTIONS !” – then someone needs to be singled out and front-paged for their imaginative genius.

It’d be a change from yet another damned propagandist sell on the Stadium, if nothing else.

[ends]

Dunedin city was ranked at the top of the agency’s [NZTA] list for urban intersection crashes causing either fatal or serious injuries during the five years from 2006 to 2010. The city also featured in the top five for the crash categories involving pedestrians (second), motorcycles (third), older drivers (third), cyclists (fourth) and young drivers (fourth), and ranked sixth for accidents caused by distracted drivers. ODT 24.3.12

Dunedin is ranked the third-worst local authority area in New Zealand for fatal and serious injury crashes, statistics in the NZTA’s “communities at risk” register show. The NZTA has compiled lists ranking local authorities across 12 categories, although there is some contention about the methodology used to record the statistics. ODT 23.10.11

Related Post and Comments:
6.2.13 Editorial bias

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Business, DCC, Design, Economics, Hot air, Media, Name, People, Politics, Project management, Stadiums, Tourism