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Dunedin Symphony Orchestra to former Hanover Street Baptist Church

NEW NAME ● EXCITING PROGRAMME ● HERITAGE BUILDING

DSO logoDSO 1

Dunedin now needs to get enthusiastic about the concert series, talking about it, anticipating the performances and backing to the hilt the sinfonia as it prepares for a momentous year.

### ODT Online Mon, 1 Feb 2016
Editorial: Supporting the music
OPINION Dunedin has a vibrant arts culture and one of the most significant parts of the culture is the Southern Sinfonia. […] To celebrate its 50th year, the sinfonia has chosen to make some major changes to mark the occasion and one of them is the change of name to the Dunedin Symphony Orchestra. One of the most exciting pieces of news to come out of the recently-announced changes is the sinfonia has outgrown its premises, growing from a small group to a larger orchestra playing symphonic music. To accommodate the growth, it is leaving behind the rehearsal rooms and office at the Carnegie Centre and moving in May to Hanover Hall, in Hanover St.
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Hanover Street Baptist Church Building-two-col2 [dcbc.co.nz] 1Past and present Baptist church buildings, Hanover St cnr Great King St [dcbc.co.nz] tweaked by whatifdunedin

Heritage New Zealand Category 1 historic place – List No. 4792
Hanover Street Baptist Church (built 1912), 65 Hanover Street, Dunedin

Summary: The first meeting of the Baptist Church in Dunedin was held in 1863. Baptist meetings were held in the courthouse until 1864 when the site on the corner of Hanover and Great King Streets was purchased and a church was built to the design of Robert Arthur Lawson (1833-1902).
A fund to build a new church was initiated in 1900 and the proposal was brought forward in 1909 by which time the old building was considered “old and antiquated and unsightly”. It was demolished in 1910 and the foundation stone of the new building was laid on 8 October 1910 on the same site. It was completed in 1912 at a cost of £7,000.

Architect: Edmund Anscombe (1874-1948) was born in Sussex and came to New Zealand as a child. He began work as a builder’s apprentice in Dunedin and in 1901 went to America to study architecture. He returned to Dunedin in 1907 and designed the School of Mines building for the University of Otago. The success of this design gained him the position of architect to the University. Five of the main University buildings were designed by Anscombe, as well as Otago Girls’ High School and several of Dunedin’s finest commercial buildings including the Lindo Ferguson Building (1927) and the Haynes building.

█ Wikipedia: Hanover Street Baptist Church

DCBC HISTORY
On September 6, 1863 Hanover Street Baptist Church was founded – constituted as a church with 22 members. As one of the earliest NZ Baptist churches – Dunedin was first settled by Europeans in 1849 – it was a church with a mission: in a strongly Presbyterian city it sought to be a church which lowered the barriers to enable people to become part of it. Unlike most Baptist churches of the time it had open membership which required only a full commitment to Jesus Christ – reaching outwards was its heartbeat. In the years that followed it started many other Baptist churches in the city, helped set up the Baptist Union of churches in New Zealand and launched the Baptist missionary society, sending out some of the first Baptist missionaries from New Zealand. Into the next century Hanover St Baptist was a strong growing church, but numbers declined in the early 1900s. However, following the Depression the church regained its strength. Link

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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