Tag Archives: Dunedin City

Dunedin

### ODT Online Wed, 5 Jan 2011
Opinion: This city’s got a lot to offer
By Simon Cunliffe
In a season of resolutions, my own include making better use of all the great amenities that our city and its surrounds have to offer. Here, in no particular order, are 10 good reasons to live in and enjoy Dunedin in 2011.
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-Simon Cunliffe is deputy editor (news) of the Otago Daily Times.

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Your City Our Future – call for community feedback and suggestions

Dunedin City Council
Media Release

Your City, Our Future – Have Your Say

This item was published on 20 Dec 2010.

The Dunedin City Council is planning the third stage of the Your City Our Future (YCOF) community engagement programme.

The first stage was the Futures Forum held in July 2010 when more than 200 stakeholders met to discuss the future direction of the city. The second stage involved nine leadership teams, made up of key community leaders and stakeholders, meeting regularly to discuss the future direction of the city.

Mayor Dave Cull says, “This programme provides a holistic vision for the city and it is important that the community plays an active part in creating that vision. ” I’m pleased that in my new role as Mayor, I have the opportunity to build on the work that has been done to date, and help shape Dunedin into the city its community wants it to be.”

To this end, the DCC is inviting the community to provide input into the YCOF programme. From this week, Dunedin residents will be able to offer feedback and suggestions on the Your City Our Future project at www.dunedin.govt.nz/ycof. The DCC has made the project available online to engage as wide a cross-section of the community as possible.

DCC Corporate Policy Manager, Nicola Johnston says, “We want to make this process as open and accessible as we can. We have had extremely good feedback from the leadership teams, with 96% enthusiastic about continuing to be part of the process and placing the information on the website with the feedback form allows us to gather a more informal perspective.”

The YCOF programme seeks to ensure a co-ordinated approach for community input into visioning and futures thinking in:

* Community Outcomes – refresh the Community Plan vision and outcomes;
* City Development Strategy – an integrated strategy for Dunedin’s urban development over the next 30 years, including a Spatial Plan; and
* Sustainability Framework.

The YCOF process was developed based on the strategic consultation process undertaken in 2001/02 – ‘Choices for the Future – 2021’ on which Dunedin city’s original Community Plan was based.

Contact Nicola Johnston or Tami Sargeant on 474 3327.

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RE:SPEAK ‘Considering Dunedin’

Updated post Fri, Mar 2015 at 2:47 p.m.
RE:SPEAK is no longer online. The text below is full extent of the mention to What if? Dunedin made by Byron Kinnaird on 17.11.10.

Productspec reviews What if? Dunedin… by Byron

Respeak 17.11.10 Productspec Wellington - Byron [respeak.net]

“A vibrant and well-informed blog has emerged from the discussion around Dunedin’s new stadium, with intentions to spread its dialogue wider.

Launched by Paul Le Comte during the development of the Otago Stadium, this blog has now evolved into a frequently updated, and informed (and informative) source of information and news for the far South.

Bringing Elizabeth Kerr in to contribute as well, the site has manifested a crucial context for debate and discussion on the public project, which now sits on Dunedin’s waterfront. Have a look through their archive of posts for an intriguing, and detailed account of the process, as Le Comte says, “when else in our lifetime are we going to see dear old Dunners throw a couple of hundred million dollars at one project, let’s really have a say of some sort.”

Read more at http://respeak.net/articles/considering-dunedin

****

Jon Thompson at Wellington maintains @Productspec – New Zealand’s national database of architecture and design products, specifications and CAD details.

http://www.productspec.net

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NZ Herald’s spin on Dunedin

How to push the Otago Farmers Market, yusss!!

### nzherald.co.nz 5:30 AM Tuesday Nov 30, 2010
Dunedin: Buckets of cool charm
By Rachel Grunwell
Like your frocks fabulous and your produce pesticide-free? Dunedin’s for you, writes Rachel Grunwell.

Dunedin is cold and there’s nothing much to do there. Yeah right, as the folks at Tui would say (with apologies to Speights). Rather, Dunedin boasts gourmet kai, fabulous fashion, world-class festivals, stunning scenery fit for the big screen and a deliciously scandalous castle with secret gardens.

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Architecture Dunedin, a free published guide

### ODT Online Fri, 29 Oct 2010
Dunedin’s heritage celebrated
By Kim Dungey
Publishers weighing up which stunning buildings to include in a booklet on Dunedin architecture identified more than 100 contenders within a 6km radius. Architecture Dunedin, a free 44-page guide to the city’s architecture, will be in cafes, libraries, museums and information centres from today. It is also being sent to all local secondary schools. In the end, the team selected about 70 buildings to highlight, listing around 30 other notable sites at the back.
The booklet was developed and funded by Parker Warburton architects, with help from the New Zealand Historic Places Trust, the Dunedin City Council, Tourism Dunedin and Michael Findlay, of the University of Otago design studies department.
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Insights: noticing/managing city views

### ODT Online Wed, 27 Oct 2010
Opinion: Rear ends on show in Dunedin
By Chris Skellett
Chris Skellett notices that life in Dunedin has been getting a little back to front. In recent weeks, I’ve become increasingly aware of a puzzling theme to my life in Dunedin … I suddenly realised that throughout Dunedin we are increasingly defining our positions with respect to the buildings that we find ourselves behind!
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Prista Apartments: Resource consent Decision + Appeal

DECISION. RESOURCE CONSENT HAS BEEN GRANTED FOR DEMOLITION OF THE FACADES AND BUILDINGS AT 372-392 PRINCES ST, 11 STAFFORD ST, DUNEDIN.

The Decision says:

[Submitters’ Presentations]
Ms Kerr spoke to her submission. She answered questions from the Committee, and confirmed that she appeared as a private individual and not an expert witness.”

Everybody else got a full paragraph or more.

*sob*

DUNEDIN CITY COUNCIL OVERLOOKS DISTRICT PLAN PROTECTIONS FOR FOUR LISTED FACADES.

THIS WOULDN’T HAPPEN IN CHRISTCHURCH. THE CHRISTCHURCH CITY COUNCIL STANDS BY ITS DISTRICT PLAN PROTECTIONS FOR HERITAGE.

****

Read the Letter of Decision here:
372-392 Princes Street – Letter of Decision 14.9.10

Read the Appeal here:
NZHPT section 121 RMA appeal, Prista Apartments, Dunedin, 5 October 2010

[updated 18.6.13]

Related Posts and Comments:
4.3.11 Reaction to another instance of unthinking ad-hocism from City Hall
13.9.10 Same again, Dunedin City District Plan about to be ignored
4.5.10 Prista Apartments: Dunedin’s goldrush-era heritage won’t fall over, unless you make it
11.2.10 Note to DCC, via New Jersey
24.1.10 Prista Apartments: 372-392 Princes St and 11 Stafford St

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Invitation to ALL #High St Cable Car

DUNEDIN CABLE CAR TRUST

Reintroduction of High Street Cable Car
Community Information Meeting

Saturday 11 September 2010
High Street School, 10am – 5pm

Come along to the Community Information Meeting at High Street School on Saturday 11 September 2010 any time between 10am and 5pm to find out about the reintroduction of the Cable Car to the High Street, Mornington.

Members of the Dunedin Cable Car Trust will be present as will displays and information areas where ideas and thoughts can be discussed and brought out into the open with regards the best possible outcomes for the project.

The Dunedin Cable Car Trust is made up of genuine Dunedin supporters who wish for nothing more than to see the reintroduction of the Cable Car to the High Street and a project that the people of Dunedin can feel part of and take pride in.

We look forward to seeing you there on Saturday 11 September 2010.

Dunedin Cable Car Trust
Tony Chance, Bill Campbell, Phillip Cole
Neville Jemmett, Don Myers, Sue Russell

dcctrust@gmail.com

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No surprises with former CPO redevelopment

### ODT Online Fri, 13 Aug 2010
Former chief post office not ready in time for world cup
By Peter McIntosh
Dunedin’s former chief post office appears unlikely to be ready as a four-star hotel in time for next year’s Rugby World Cup. Three months after being purchased by Distinction Hotels owner Geoffrey Thomson, of Invercargill, the building’s exterior remains battered, boarded-up and in need of much work, as does the interior.
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Opportunities for Dunedin events venues

### ODT Online Wed, 30 Jun 2010
Event managers show interest in stadium
By Hamish McNeilly
Dunedin is set to benefit from the lucrative conference and event industry, with the Forsyth Barr Stadium attracting interest from both sides of the Tasman. The yet-to-be-completed stadium was one of 170 companies marketed at Meetings 2010, an annual trade show held in Auckland last week, attracting buyers and sellers involved in the $1 billion industry.

Tourism Dunedin chief executive Hamish Saxton said the stadium, coupled with the refurbishment of the Dunedin Centre, had “generated plenty of interest with buyers”.

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Investing in Dunedin’s historic heritage: former Bank of New Zealand

Ted Daniels is best known for his ownership of 108-year-old Bracken Court in Moray Pl, which was spectacularly gutted by fire in July 2005 and was rebuilt for about $3 million, while Mr Marsh owns other Dunedin buildings.

### ODT Online Mon, 14 Jun 2010
Historic BNZ building work ongoing
By Simon Hartley
Work on Dunedin’s 126-year-old historic former BNZ building in the Exchange is continuing as its owners for the past year look for tenants before considering outfitting options. Dunedin building owners Ted Daniels and Wayne Marsh purchased the former bank – a major institution in Otago’s gold rush days – in a joint venture a year ago for an undisclosed sum.
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No temporary cover: historic Stavely Building of Dunedin

One of Dunedin’s finest ‘stately’ warehouse buildings is waiting to be saved.
From the archives…

### ODT Online Mon, 24 Aug 2009
Energy-saver bulb likely fire cause
By Debbie Porteous
A fire which severely damaged one of Dunedin’s historic buildings last year most likely started in a light fixture fitted with an energy-saver bulb, a fire service investigation has found. The Stavely Building in Jetty St, built in 1897*, was left uninhabitable after the March 30 fire. In addition to the damage to the building, several businesses, including the Dunedin Ballet School, a storage firm and a curtain maker, lost all or most of their equipment and stored goods. A joint police and fire investigation took place as there were reports of the premises being insecure when the fire was discovered.
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Since the March 2008 fire the building hasn’t been temporarily roofed or weather sealed. However, according to unnamed sources the building is structurally viable for conservation, restoration and adaptive reuse options. Sources say the owner is looking to sell the fire damaged building.

*The building is significantly older than the date given by the newspaper.

****

Local historian and curator Peter Entwisle provides a history of the building based on documentary sources. Photographs by Meg Davidson, Dunedin.

Location: Southwest corner of Bond St and Jetty St, 5 Jetty St, Dunedin.
Legal Description: Lot 16 Deeds 135
Owner: POS Developments Limited, Dunedin
Architect: Nathaniel Young Armstrong Wales (1832-1903) [1]
Built: April 1878 [2] to 1879 [3]
Name: Stavely’s Bond. [4]
Materials: First floor Port Chalmers breccia; brick rendered in plaster above; slate roof.

Description:
A boldly modelled commercial warehouse in a neo-classical style, the Stavely Building commands the southwest corner of Bond St and Jetty St. Its lower floor constructed of rusticated Port Chalmers breccia was originally unpainted and of a warm, milk chocolate colour. It is particularly finely textured with its contrasting dressed and unfinished surfaces constituting a tour de force of the mason’s craft. This exceptional quality and the stone’s natural colour were obscured when it was painted some years ago.

The first floor windows on the street fronts are pedimented and like those of the second floor are set between pilasters with Corinthian capitals. Above, there are high entablatures; below, cornices capped by balustrades. At the centre of each there were large triple shell-form pediments bearing the original proprietor’s name in large letters, in a rustic Victorian font, raised in high relief. The shells were originally supported by heraldic dolphins and those on Jetty St survive. On Bond St only the base of the shell remains.

Each street front carries the date “1879” in high relief at the centre of the ground floor. Intended to make a strong statement about vigour, prosperity and confidence the building is a cornerpiece and a landmark and represents the upper level of achievement in Victorian warehouse design in New Zealand.

The prominent use of heraldic beasts and figures and lettering as part of the ornamentation facades is unusual in New Zealand in the Victorian period. Two other buildings designed by the same partnership near this time also exhibit this feature: the Garrison Hall in Dowling St, now the premises of Natural History New Zealand Ltd [recently sold to property investor William Cockerill, Dunedin], for which Mason, Wales and Stevenson called for tenders in February 1878 [5]; and Wain’s Hotel on Princes St, started a few days after the Stavely building. [6]

Recent history:
On Sunday 30 March 2008, the building suffered a major fire, thought to be arson. It did considerable damage and was widely reported, on TV3 national news that night and in the Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday editions of the Otago Daily Times. There was no loss of life and it was brought under control. By Wednesday 2 April the Otago Southland area manager of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust had been advised that the building did not need to be demolished as a safety risk. [7]

NZHPT Registration:
Category 2 Historic Place – List No. 4752 [8]

Protections:
The building is scheduled in the Dunedin City District Plan (April 2004); the Bond St and Jetty St facades are protected. [9]

Footnotes:
[1] ODT 8 March 1878 p.3f. “Tenders are invited till Noon of Monday 18th inst., for the erection of a four storey stone and brick Warehouse at corner of Bond and Jetty Streets. Mason, Wales, & Stevenson, Architects.” In a telephone call to the writer on 13/3/09 Niel Wales, formerly of the partnership Mason & Wales and a descendant of Nathaniel Young Armstrong Wales (1832-1903), first of that name in the partnership, said the latter was the designer of Stavely’s Bond. He said the firm has drawings of many buildings from that time including this one; that they are not signed but he can tell from their style who drew them. He said his ancestor was also personally responsible for Wain’s Hotel, the Garrison Hall, the Princes Street building which is now Hayward’s auction house and the former New Zealand Insurance Co. building on the corner of Crawford and lower Rattray Streets.
[2] ODT 12 April 1878 p3b “Building Improvements in the City” states that “Mr. Stavely’s” new warehouse was started in the last “day or two”.
[3] The date is rendered in relief on the Jetty and Bond Street facades.
[4] OW 7 February 1895 p.11.
[5] ODT 8 February 1878 p.3d.
[6] ODT 19 April 1878 p.3b “New Buildings” states the tender has been let and names the architects.
[7] Personal communication Owen Graham District Manager New Zealand Historic Places Trust/Peter Entwisle 2/4/2008.
[8] It is registration number 4752 and was classified in 1986 as a category C historic place. Under the reformed system of classification that has become a category 2 registration. Personal communication Heather Bauchop, NZHPT Otago Southland area office, and Peter Entwisle. 3/4/2008.
[9] Dunedin City District Plan April 2004 Vol 2, site no. B010, map no. 49, Moritzson Building (formerly), address cnr Bond and Jetty Streets.

Bibliography:
Peter Entwisle, Treasures of the Dunedin Public Art Gallery Dunedin Public Art Gallery, 1990
Hardwicke Knight & Niel Wales, Buildings of Dunedin John McIndoe Ltd, Dunedin, 1988
Otago Daily Times Dunedin, 1861- [ODT]
Otago Witness Dunedin, 1851-1932 [OW]

Peter Entwisle
3 April 2008

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Dunedin and climate change

### ODT Online Tue, 13 Apr 2010
Sea could claim city suburbs
By David Loughrey
Dunedin could face some stark choices by the end of the century, with sea-level rise expected to force either the retreat from, or complete evacuation of, South Dunedin, St Kilda and St Clair. The area has been identified as one of five “hot spots”, the most vulnerable areas of the city. The others are the harbourside; the lower Taieri Plain, including the Dunedin airport; populated estuaries along the coast; and the ecosystems of upland conservation regions.

“Surface flooding will become chronic in these areas as the 21st century progresses,” the report, by University of Otago Emeritus Professor of Geography Blair Fitzharris said. But the news in the report, commissioned by the Dunedin City Council, is not all bad.

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DCC Media Release – Dunedin and climate change

Dunedin City Council
Media Release

Warmer, Wetter, Windier – Climate Change Report Highlights City’s At Risk Areas

A report, commissioned by the Dunedin City Council, identifying the areas of Dunedin most vulnerable to climate change is to be released today.

The report, by University of Otago Emeritus Professor of Geography Professor Blair Fitzharris, outlines the expected current best estimates of climate change for Dunedin. These include temperature changes of up to 1.1degC by 2040, and up to 2.5degC by 2090; rainfall increase of up to 5% by 2040 and 15% by 2090, and sea level rises of up to 1.6m by 2090.

Prof Fitzharris explains that factors controlling the climate of Dunedin will largely stay the same as at present, but as projected global warming takes hold, there will be a slow increase in sea surface temperatures, an increase in the strength of the westerlies wind band over Southern New Zealand, and more frequent and vigorous frontal systems.

“The weather will remain changeable, but it will gradually become warmer. After the 2040s, what is currently regarded as a warm year will have become the norm. Risks from frost and low level snow storms will markedly decrease.”

Increased evaporation from higher temperatures is expected to be offset by higher rainfall, so drought incidence will remain largely unchanged for most of the city.

Rainfall events will become about 20% more intense, leading to higher storm runoff but lower river levels between events. Larger floods are expected, leaving low-lying areas near river mouths and estuaries vulnerable.

The main areas of Dunedin at risk from projected climate change are low-lying, densely populated, urban areas, especially South Dunedin; coasts and their communities; major transport infrastructure including Dunedin Airport; and natural ecosytems.

Five hotspot areas of the city especially vulnerable to change are: the South Dunedin urban area, including the St Clair and St Kilda shoreline; the harbour-side shoreline, including the entrance to Otago Harbour; the lower Taieri Plain, especially Dunedin Airport; populated estuaries along the Pacific Coast; and conservation lands of upland regions.

Prof Fitzharris has recommended the DCC should develop policy responses that focus on adaptation to the expected changes, rather than measures to reduce the amount of greenhouse gases produced. “This is because major long-term planning and infrastructure problems will result from the expected very large and ongoing impacts.

“While Council should encourage mitigation, less attention should be given to this issue, except where it leads to energy efficiencies or protects the city’s tourist image” concludes Prof Fitzharris.

However, should “shrewd adaptation measures” be realised, there were some sectors of the city that could benefit from climate change. These include agriculture and forestry, due to longer and better growing seasons, less frost and increased rainfall. Energy use in the city could also fall due to reduced demand in winter, and water resources could benefit from increased stream flows.

Contact DCC on 477 4000.

Last reviewed: 12 Apr 2010 1:15pm

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Predicted Dunedin rates rise…

### ODT Online Sat, 16 Jan 2010
Rate rise of 7.3% projected
By David Loughrey
Dunedin ratepayers look set to pay an extra 7.3% in rates for the next financial year, along with increased fees and charges for activities ranging from building a house to burying the dead. This year’s draft budget shows the city’s rates bill will rise by 61.3% in the next 10 years, 35.7% of which is the result of inflation.

“Beyond regular, annual inflation effects, the two main reasons for the increases in rates are the increasing debt servicing costs associated with the capital expenditure programme, and the 5% per annum increases in the funding of water and wastewater depreciation.”
-Jim Harland, chief executive

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ODT Online Sat, 16 Jan 2010
Operating costs will jump $1.4 million
By Chris Morris and David Loughrey
With the big decisions made, and the borrowing under way, the Dunedin City Council now has to find a way to manage its debt-heavy budget for the next year and beyond. Annual plan meetings begin next week, and the result will determine just how much the city dips into ratepayers’ pockets to pay for water and wastewater, the Forsyth Barr Stadium, the Town Hall upgrade and many other projects. Dunedin City Council reporters David Loughrey and Chris Morris examine the issues.
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Related stories:
Cost of dying, other services may rise
Council housing rents set to rise in order to cover increased costs

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