Tag Archives: DScene

Fairfax NZ News at Dunedin

Following the closure of DScene, Fairfax Media has confirmed the establishment of a Fairfax NZ News bureau position in Dunedin.

Former DScene reporter Wilma McCorkindale has been appointed to the role and has already begun filing Otago stories to the Stuff website and national newspapers.

McCorkindale can be contacted on 027 667 7912
Email: wilma dot mccorkindale at fairfaxmedia dot co dot nz

Related Post and Comments:
10.5.13 DScene, staying power . . .

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Media, Name, People, Pics

DScene, staying power . . .

DScene 8-5-13 (screenshot detail) 1[screenshot]

THE CONUNDRUM
DScene could fall victim to the disease rabidly attacking the Fairfax Media conglomerate. How to deal with the local monopoly, should the war have been fought online, not on paper.

### ODT Online Fri, 10 May 2013
D-Scene newspaper may close
Dunedin community newspaper D-Scene may be ceasing publication after five years. The Fairfax Media-owned The Press reported yesterday a proposal to close the weekly publication, a subsidiary of The Southland Times.
Read more

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### 3news.co.nz Fri, 10 May 2013 11:03a.m.
Dunedin’s D-Scene paper tipped to close
By Thomas Mead, Online Reporter
Fairfax Media is considering ending the popular Dunedin community newspaper D-Scene, putting eight jobs at risk. The media conglomerate has put a proposal to staff and is now deciding the fate of the weekly publication in a two-week consultation period with those affected. Southland Times general manager Sue Gregory is declining to comment until the consultation period is over, but confirmed the initiative was underway. D-Scene was purchased by Fairfax Media in September 2008, but is in a competitive environment, up against the well-read Otago Daily Times and weekly The Star.
3news Link

[This too, gives pause . . .]

### NZ Herald Online 5:30 AM Friday May 3, 2013
John Drinnan: Local history shipped out
History has a price and New Zealand’s photographic history is being shipped to Little Rock, Arkansas. Veteran sports photographer Peter Bush is shocked by Fairfax Media’s decision to sell its newspaper photo archive to an American firm. Fairfax has told Auckland staff it will be shipping photo archives for most of its Australian and New Zealand newspapers to the Rogers Photo Archive, a company based in Little Rock. The company will send back digital versions of the photos, but will keep the original prints, including photos of Sir Edmund Hillary.
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[2008, remember the Smiths back then . . .]

### stuff.co.nz Last updated 13:59 09/09/2008
Fairfax buying Dunedin community paper D-Scene
Dunedin community newspaper D-Scene looks set to join the Fairfax stable with the media giant announcing it is in the final stages of buying it. A spin-off from Queenstown’s Mountain Scene, the paper was set up earlier this year in a market dominated by long-time incumbent, the Otago Daily Times.
Read more

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### nbr.co.nz Tuesday September 09, 2008
Fairfax buys a lemon
By Mitchell Hall
Fairfax media’s decision to buy Dunedin’s struggling free weekly newspaper D Scene has one competitor sniffing that there’s no business case for the purchase – given how much money it is said to have been losing. The Otago Daily Times is the oldest newspaper in the country – and one of the last independent newspapers not owned by APN or Fairfax. The ODT’s business manager (and Allied Press director), Nick Smith, says a large editorial team designed D Scene with the Otago Daily Times in their sights. “The Otago Daily Times was seen (by them) to be an old and staid paper circulating in a one horse town. “They decided that the ODT was something that – according to their sales people – was a relic from the past, and they were smart boys who’d done all this research and they can take the town over.”
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Business, Design, Economics, Media, Name, People, Project management

Carisbrook: Shifting explanations for DCC $7m spend

Register to read DScene online at http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

### DScene 20 Mar 2013
Rant or rave: your say
Missing million (pages 8-9)
By Terry Wilson – Parkside
We see in D Scene that the Dunedin City Council paid $7 million for Carisbrook while their confidential valuation was for only $2.5m.
Mayor Dave Cull said that the purchase was to shore up the finances of the Otago Rugby Football Union.
If the real purpose of the sale was to donate an overpayment of $4.5m to the ORFU, then the DCC has misled the public during the public consultation on the matter. It might be inappropriate for me to suggest that the $7m non-confidential valuation of Carisbrook was procured by the DCC for the purpose of justifying the undisclosed $4.5m overpayment to the ORFU.
The validity of this valuation seems very questionable to me. Following this $7m payment, the ORFU required a further DCC bailout. One factor in this is that they only received $6m, not $7m.
The DCC has been questioned many times about what happened to the missing $1m, but they won’t say.
I think the public wants to see more honesty from the DCC.

Mayor Dave Cull replies: ‘‘$7 million was paid to the ORFU by way of $5m in cash and a $2m offset of a loan of $2m previously lent from the council to the ORFU.’’ #bookmark

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Business, DCC, Economics, Hot air, Media, Name, ORFU, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums

Stadium: Ombudsman investigation confirms private funding

Register to read DScene online at http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

### DScene 20 Mar 2013
Raw deal alleged on stadium rights (page 5)
By Wilma McCorkindale
Dunedin’s flash new stadium gets $7 million every 10 years in private funding, an Ombudsman investigation reveals. Newly released documents show the stadium receives $715,000 annually – $7,150,000 over 10 years.
D Scene has learned from an informed source that $5m of that funding comes from investment advisory firm Forsyth Barr in return for naming rights of the new $200m-plus state-of-the-art arena.
Stadium lobbyist Bev Butler said the new figures showed ratepayers got a raw deal on private funding. ‘‘In December 2007, Brian Meredith of The Marketing Bureau, commissioned by the Carisbrook Stadium Trust, addressed the council stating that the head naming rights were worth more than $10m,’’ Butler said in a statement.
‘‘This has been reported twice in the media. The mayor, councillors and public were left with the perception that Forsyth Barr had signed up for the rights for $10m. This latest revelation shows that this was not the case and that Forsyth Barr ended up paying no more than $5m for the naming rights.’’
Butler, who initiated the latest investigation, said the rest of the annual $715,000 in private funding came from other companies who had a high profile in the stadium.
{continues} #bookmark

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Business, Construction, CST, DCC, DVML, Economics, Media, Name, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums

Critical and deliberative journalism

“It is an irony that media executives who are so quick to invoke media freedom for themselves can be equally zealous about suppressing academic freedom or alternative media freedom.”

### scoop.co.nz 22:54 October 16, 2012
Pacific Scoop
Media blind spots overcome by ‘critical’ journalism, says first Pacific j-professor
By Alex Perrottet – Pacific Media Watch
Restoring public trust, engaging in critical journalism, and opening the media’s eyes to common blind spots were all on the agenda for the inaugural address of the first professor in journalism studies in NZ and the Pacific. Professor David Robie spoke to a crowded conference room of almost 200 people at AUT University tonight after receiving his professorship last year.

“Not only is he an academic, a journalist, he is a committed person whose questions will always be: What is the truth and what will we do about it?”

Beginning with the current so-called Hackgate media crisis and visiting plenty of other “hot spots” throughout the presentation, Professor Robie charted the course of his life’s journey throughout New Zealand, Africa, Europe and back to Oceania. He warned that the current media crisis seemed to be facing a growing “soft” reporting of the Leveson Inquiry in Britain – with a report due next month – and the Finkelstein and Convergence Reviews in Australia. “Already there are concerns by critics that the media has started soft-peddling the issue,” he said. He said the latest edition of Pacific Journalism Review examined the issue of rebuilding public trust in the media.
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30.8.12 DCC seen by Fairfax Business Bureau deputy editor Tim Hunter
3.8.12 Extraordinary editorials

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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