Tag Archives: Deconstruction

Christchurch Cathedral : Marcus Brandt and the People’s Steeple Project

christchurch-cathedral-steeple-by-country-farm-garden-photos-cfgphoto-com-render1-1

While Bishop Victoria and the Anglican church property trust (CPT) continue to sit on their hands perhaps awaiting devine intervention, who knew, it turns out that a group of stalwart people in New Zealand – with an incredible level of international assistance – are busy planning a very special Cathedral project.

From: Mark Belton
Sent: Sunday, February 26, 2017 11:11 PM
To: [Elizabeth Kerr + RCC Mailing List]
Subject: Introducing The People’s Steeple

Dear Cathedral Restoration supporters

Below is a link to a video clip of the People’s Steeple proposal being demonstrated by its creator Marcus Brandt. Marcus has been in CHCH this last week promoting the People’s Steeple Project.

The People’s Steeple is a mind blowing proposal…audacious, visionary, inspiring. Lifting telescoping timber sections of the spire 60 metres into the sky…powered by about 500 trained people working 16 capstan winches placed around Cathedral Square, watched by up to 50,000 people in the Square.

The US based Timber Framers Guild (TFG), a professional organisation of engineers and timber framers has offered to be the lead contractor to build, assemble, and erect the People’s Steeple. The lead NZ engineers would be renowned CHCH timber engineer – Prof Andy Buchanan whose report on the project is attached.

Skilled TFG members from the US and around the world would gift their time, working in the Square preparing and assembling the timbers, and then helping lead the steeple’s erection. Up to 300 TFG members along with locals could be involved working in the Square over a period of about 6 months.

The TFG have successfully undertaken 75 community building projects over the last 25 years in the US and around the world. They are super keen to offer their services to CHCH. The TFG emphasise their projects are about ‘building communities’.

Marcus says would take only 2-3 hrs to lift and secure the telescoping sections. Flooring and bells would be assembled the same day and in the evening the bells would ring out…proclaiming to the world – ‘Christchurch is back’….and a Hangi feast would be opened…for a crowd of 50,000! International media would broadcast the event around the world…the whole enterprise being about engaging our community in the most positive way…and it would ignite fund raising for the restoration of the cathedral. It is envisaged the construction of the People’s Steeple would lead restoration of the cathedral and the Square.

It is noted huge pro bono contributions from the Guild’s members are being offered, and Blakely Pacific NZ Ltd, a US based forestry company has offered to provide the timbers at no cost from giant 125-year-old Port Orford Cedar from its Pioneer Forest in South Canterbury.

The Restore Christchurch Cathedral Group is strongly supportive of the People’s Steeple.

We hope this inspiring project will help engage and enthuse Christchurch people with recovery of the cathedral, and help get the cathedral restoration programme underway.

Warm regards

Mark Belton
Co-Chair, Restore Christchurch Cathedral

Mark Belton
Managing Director
Permanent Forests NZ Limited
PO Box 34, Lyttelton 8841, New Zealand

See attached reports by Marcus Brandt, Andy Buchanan, and the TFG.
TFG People’s Steeple Project approach notes-10-2-16
Steeple 16-8-12
M Belton report on Timber Framers Guild conf and People’s Steeple 23-9-16
Engineering the People’s Steeple v9

The People’s Steeple | Whare Films Published on Feb 23, 2017

christchurch-cathedral-tonyhphotography-co-nz-bw-render1-1

The People’s Steeple
Rebuilding the Bell Tower at Christchurch Cathedral

Marcus Brandt: An Introduction

For the last thirty years or so, I’ve been restoring historic stone and timber buildings, mostly in Southeastern Pennsylvania. I’m a working master carpenter and stone mason. Most of the historic buildings I am called to work on are 150 to 300 years old. Solid and well crafted, these old buildings tend to age well, but neglect and damage can take a toll. Much of my effort is spent in repairing and strengthening the timber frames of barns, bridges, houses, gristmills and churches. I’ve had several commissions to build new structures in the old style. I have organized and led many barn raisings, in which hundreds of volunteers gather to raise a barn’s frame in a day. A good crew will have the sides and roof on too.
Straightening, plumbing and repairing damaged stone walls is often called for. It is not uncommon to straighten a wall 10 meters high that is out of plumb by 400 or 500 mm. Having studied and worked with several Scots masons, I’m a strong believer in lime based mortars and good masonry practice. The interface between stone and timber is of particular interest to me.
Since 1989, I’ve been a professional member of the Timber Framers Guild (TFG) and a member of the Traditional Timberframe Research and Advisory Group (TTRAG). That part of the Guild focuses on understanding the past practice of the craft with a view that the past might help inform future practice. I have advised many historical and preservation societies and sat on many review boards.
As a result of my participation in Guild efforts and projects, I was invited to go to both Scotland and China to investigate “lost” technologies for the Public Broadcast Service series NOVA. We built working siege weapons in Scotland and in China we built a bridge design that hadn’t been built since the Mongol invasion.
I teach Traditional building skills at Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA. I’m particularly interested in ways that the pre-industrial past practice can inform building in the greener, sustainable post-industrial world of the future.
I serve as a sailor, boson and ship’s carpenter aboard the tall ship Gazela (www.Gazela.org). That experience has taught me much about rigging and raising heavy loads in confined spaces. It’s taught me about erecting tall, secure, flexible, stable structures that get tossed about and shaken mercilessly. A sea captain in her own right, my wife serves as First Mate aboard Gazela. She out-ranks me, and helps keep me humble.
Since 22 February, I have been working as much as possible to develop a method to rebuild the Bell tower at Christchurch. With the help of friends and students, and the forbearance of my wife, I developed a plan that is beautiful, solid, strong, flexible, earthquake resistant, buildable, durable, and familiar. But more than anything, I want to use the rebuilding of the steeple as a vehicle for rebuilding and strengthening the community. And, once built, serve as an outward witness to the inward love we have for each other as fellow humans.
I look forward to doing this project with the able help of my best friends in the world…many of whom I haven’t yet met.

█ More information about the People’s Steeple Project and participants at http://thepeoplessteeple.org/

christchurch-cathedral-detail-mygola-com-tweaked

Related Posts and Comments:
23.12.15 Christ Church Cathedral: practical news from govt mediator…
14.7.12 Rival newspaper on historic heritage #cathedral
2.3.12 Christ Church, Cathedral Square

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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christchurch-cathedral-mudbirdceramics-blogspot-co-nz

christchurch-cathedral-5-aug-2003-by-cindy-staticflickr-com-tweaked

*Images: Christchurch Cathedral – (from top) colour render by whatifdunedin [photo source: Country Farm Garden Photos at cfgphoto.com]; black white render by whatifdunedin [photo source: Tony H Photography at tonyhphotography.co.nz]; colour photo of steeple detail [mygola.com]; cathedral with chalice by Sisson Photography [via photoshelter.com]; black white photo by Mudbird Ceramics [mudbirdceramics.blogspot.co.nz]; colour photo by Cindy taken on 5 Aug 2003 [via staticflickr.com]

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Christ Church Cathedral: practical news from govt mediator Miriam Dean QC

Updated post
Sat, 26 Dec 2015 at 3:25 a.m.

### beehive.govt.nz 23 December, 2015
Gerry Brownlee Media Release
Report confirms ChristChurch Cathedral can be reinstated

Minister for Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Gerry Brownlee says the decision by the Anglican Church to progress investigations into reinstating the ChristChurch Cathedral will be greatly appreciated by the wider community.
The Church Property Trust, which owns the Anglican Cathedral in Cathedral Square, has received an independent report from a Government-appointed consultant, who has reviewed the engineering options for the iconic city building.
“All of the parties’ engineers agree that the reinstatement of the Cathedral would require a combination of repair, restoration and reconstruction,” Mr Brownlee says. “The issue then comes back to cost and that is something the Church Property Trust will need absolute certainty of before it can commit to any work going ahead.”
Mr Brownlee says CPT is keen to enter further discussions with the Government in regard to progressing towards a reinstatement plan for the ChristChurch Cathedral, and that will happen in the New Year.
“And that is why we need to gain certainty about the affordability of this project and be able to work through the options. The positive outcome here is that there are now options to work through and that CPT is willing to do so.”
Link

███ Report on facilitated discussions with engineers on engineering options for repair, restoration or replacement of ChristChurch Cathedral. (PDF, 11.22 MB)

220211 News:Don Scott/The Press Christchurch earthquake. The Cathedral with its spire missing.Christchurch Cathedral 1 [Stuff.co.nz]Photos: Don Scott – The Press

Most of the building is intact – the scaremongering re the safety and cost of a rebuild is just that.

The Anglican Church has agreed to consider “reinstating” the Christ Church Cathedral at a press conference today.

### Stuff.co.nz Last updated 18:14, December 23 2015
The Press
Anglican Church to consider reinstating Christ Church Cathedral video
By Michael Wright
[…] A report by Government-appointed mediator Miriam Dean QC found the cathedral could be either reconstructed to be “indistinguishable” from its pre-quake self or replaced.
[…] Restoration campaigner Philip Burdon, co-chair of the Great Christchurch Buildings Trust, said he was “delighted and relieved” to learn the cathedral could be repaired, and was certain the necessary funds could be raised. “It had been the argument of the church that the building was unrepairable. The question of whether restoration was possible or not has been answered – I think that will be a considerable relief to the community.”
Read more

Yes, the Bishop is dragging her heels but MONEY might change her mind. Watch the Press video for her public statement and body language.

Earlier documents commissioned by Great Christchurch Building Trust (GCBT), documents received 10 July 2012 via Mark Belton at Restore Christchurch Cathedral:

Christchurch Cathedral Structural engineering Review Final 27June2012
(PDF, 94.8 KB)

Christchurch Cathedral MRO prelim sketches (F)
(PDF, 3.9 MB)

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14.7.12 Rival newspaper on historic heritage #cathedral
2.3.12 Christ Church, Cathedral Square

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Rival newspaper on historic heritage #cathedral

The Press editorial, today. Balanced.

### stuff.co.nz Last updated 08:31 14/07/2012
Editorial: Anglican diocese should give account
The pause in the demolition of Christ Church Cathedral is a positive sign that the building’s fate is not sealed. Its destruction, which had seemed the inevitable outcome of the Anglican Church’s stand, is now less certain as the Government and the diocese consider the Greater Christchurch Building Trust’s report that sets out a plan for the cathedral’s conservation. The result is the sense that, for the first time, the contending parties are in dialogue.

As The Press wrote about the consecration of the cathedral, in 1881, the building is “a symbol to our children and their descendants of the spirit which animated those who projected the settlement of Canterbury, a spirit which we who have come after have, however imperfectly, endeavoured to give form and shape to”.

The previous lack of serious dialogue had raised the temperature of the debate, causing unnecessary division in a city in need of unity. Positions had become entrenched, personal accusations were too common and the tone was embittered. The pause to consider eases that tension, at least temporarily. Even if the Anglican hierarchy remains committed to demolition, the advocates of retention will at least have the consolation of knowing that they were listened to.
They certainly have given their cause the best chance of success by producing the Building Trust report. It is a considered document from prestigious engineers that gives a detailed account of how the cathedral can be saved with most of its features intact. The somewhat vague assertions that salvage was possible have now been hardened into a clear plan of action.
Read more

Commissioned by Great Christchurch Building Trust (GCBT), documents received 10 July via Mark Belton at Restore Christchurch Cathedral:

Christchurch Cathedral Structural engineering Review Final 27June2012
(PDF, 94.8 KB)

Christchurch Cathedral MRO prelim sketches (F)
(PDF, 3.9 MB)

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2.3.12 Christ Church, Cathedral Square

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Christchurch heritage buildings approved for demolition #eqnz

Canterbury Earthquake
Media advisory – Tuesday 15 March 2011, 1930 hours

Process for approving deconstruction
In the case of heritage buildings, a robust process is followed that involves an assessment by Heritage and by Lifelines (utilities) and an inspection carried out by a suitably qualified engineer.
Every endeavour is being made to contact all owners of buildings if demolition or deconstruction is necessary.
There will be no salvaging of materials in buildings unless it is by the building owner or those contracted to carry out salvage work.

Heritage buildings approved for deconstruction
* Provincial Hotel – 274 Cashel Street
* 112 Centaurus Road – Dwelling
* Cathedral Grammar – Chester Street West 8 (2), Stratham Building
* Austral Building – 603 – 615 Colombo Street (includes 170 Tuam Street)
* Bean Bags and Beyond – 626 (aka 626) Colombo Street
* 625 – 629 Colombo Street – Commercial buildings
* Wave House/Winnie Bagoes – 194 Gloucester Street
* Hereford Court – 116 Hereford
* Piko Whole Foods – 229 Kilmore Street
* Park Lane Handbags – 111 – 113 Lichfield Street
* Former Ridley Building – 116 Lichfield Street
* Nurse Maude – 192 Madras Street
* Charlie Backpacker – 268 Madras Street
* Former City Council Offices – 198 Manchester Street
* Forbes Building – 17 Norwich Quay 17, Lyttleton
* Rhodes Memorial Hospital – Overdale Drive 2
* Edison Hall, Workshop, Witchery – 230 – 232 Tuam St
* Domo – 236 Tuam St
* Fuller Brothers Ltd – 180 Tuam Street
* Addington Flour Mill – 14 Wise Street
* Gopals Restaurant and Pedros Restaurant – 143 Worcester Street

This totals 21 buildings, but note that Colombo Street’s Austral Building also includes 170 Tuam Street and there are multiple buildings included in the Colombo Street addresses
NB: This list differs slightly from the list provided at the media briefing today.

Deconstruction of Addington (aka Old Woods) Flour Mill, 14 Wise St
This deconstruction was triggered by USAR, who recommended the partial or total deconstruction of the building for rescue or recovery purposes or because it presents an unacceptable safety risk from aftershocks.
There are three separate buildings on site that were assessed:

* the mill building itself that has the greatest heritage value,
* a chimney, and
* a brick-clad silos assessed as having a lesser heritage value.

The silos and chimney were badly damaged. The mill building itself was assessed as repairable. The engineer’s report recommended the deconstruction of the silos and the chimney only.
This approved deconstruction sign-off process was followed in this case and the recommendation provided to the National Controller for approval/signature on March 3.

Weblink

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Photograph of quake-damaged Addington mill building
By @Motmunter, Campbell Live cameraman

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Adding duress, Christchurch #eqnz

WHAT IF? CORRECTION

This post has been changed on receipt of information from Christchurch to confirm The Press mis-reported which building had been demolished in Hereford Street.

On Friday, a week-long moratorium on demolition was announced for Christchurch, a pause… it didn’t save the Old Trust and Loan building,
and the Olympia building.

Copy supplied:

“Unfortunately Saggio di Vino has gone and they had done so much to try and save it since the first quake. The most appalling thing though is that as well as demolishing the old Trust and Loan building over the weekend – an important Mountfort commercial building, which was badly damaged and probably had to come down, but should have been taken apart carefully – they also demolished the strengthened Olympia building next door which housed Vivace, a popular café.

The owner was not notified, even though he was known and had been part of the delegation. He is furious. They had told Civil Defence that they wanted to get out equipment and the Olympia was not dangerous at all.

All the books in the bookstore on the top floor were destroyed as well, so two tenants have had their livelihoods destroyed in the process of taking down a strengthened and largely undamaged building. It also took them ages to destroy the built-in safe (and what was inside it) from the Trust and Loan.

In the process of this demolition of the pair of buildings they also knocked a hole in the wall of Shands Emporium, the little wooden commercial building next to the NZHPT Southern Regional Office building (Shands was wrongly reported in The Press as having come down).

So much for the moratorium. Was it over-ruled from above or by council officers, some of whom it seems have considerable sway over what has been happening.

The owner of the above buildings who been very responsible about strengthening his buildings has also been denied permission to bring his engineer and builder into the city to ensure that ones which are still standing can be shored up to stop further damage happening from the aftershocks. Because they are not listed – but make an important contribution to the character of the city – they could be pulled down with not even the cursory process which applies for listed buildings.”

Anyone reading this has to think, unhappily, on the one hand ’emergency powers’, on the other ‘sick process’. Buildings will have to come down – the wrong people are making some ad hoc ‘demolition’ decisions. Why are they so uninformed, is it Brownlee up their backs? These particular decision makers, on the hoof, are another blight on Christchurch which already suffers too much.

****

16 March 2011 The Press has made a correction to this item (in italics here).

### thepress.co.nz Last updated 05:00 15/03/2011
Business people want answers
By Olivia Carville
A Christchurch business owner was shocked yesterday when he learnt his central-city building had been demolished. Peter Scalia, who ran Fortuna Books from Shands Emporium on Hereford St, said neither he nor the building owner or leaseholder had been warned of Sunday’s demolition.

“I want to know who authorised it and why we weren’t contacted. If they can demolish the building I was in without any notification, are they going to do it to other buildings?” he said.

Shands Emporium is still standing. Fortuna Books was part of Shands Emporium but in a separate building.

Scalia registered as a central-city business owner last week to gain access to the building and retrieve essential items. However, he said he never heard from authorities.

“I did everything I knew to do. I am really surprised I didn’t even get called before they bowled it. If they had of given me five minutes in there, I could have grabbed my safe, my passport and other documents. Why was it demolished yesterday, why could it not have been tomorrow? I could have been in there today.”
Read more

****

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8.3.11 LostArtChch website to identify items at risk #eqnz

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Building design to integrate safety, usefulness and enjoyment #eqnz

Design matters in Christchurch. Those supervising the reconstruction of the city should remember that. And they should see it as a positive civic attribute – something to draw on as they put the city back together again.

### nzherald.co.nz 5:30 AM Tuesday Mar 15, 2011
Design integral part of rebuilding city
By Jasper van der Lingen
Christchurch faces a decade of rebuilding. There is an urgent need to get started, and great pressure to get started immediately. Decisions made soon will shape the city for generations. This is the time, right at the outset of reconstruction, to ensure that we establish a rebuilding process and framework that has the best possible chance of producing successful results.
Read more

–Jasper van der Lingen is chairman, Canterbury Branch, New Zealand Institute of Architects

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The co-ordination needed to manage the various responsibilities of public agencies, and extent and timing of investment by the private sector is beyond the mandate or capacities of any existing institution.

### nzherald.co.nz 5:30 AM Tuesday Mar 15, 2011
New approach needed for reconstruction
By Jennifer Dixon
What is the future of Christchurch? After the devastation there have been some exciting visions and proposals offered up for the rebuilding of this city. These embrace new possibilities for urban form and function, the shape and scale of the central business district and what needs to happen to tracts of land in the eastern suburbs, now largely unsuitable for residential living.
Read more

–Jennifer Dixon is a professor of planning and dean of the National Institute of Creative Arts and Industries, Auckland University.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Letter from Christchurch 2 #eqnz

UPDATED

Today’s Press has more examples of high-handed action.

The Piko Whole-Foods Co-op store – an important social and architectural landmark – had its top storey removed before the owners knew what was going to happen. The heritage team at Christchurch City Council worked with the owners to try and stop the demolition but the top floor had already gone by the time they got there and its landmark value has been completely destroyed. The building had been earthquake strengthened within the past few years and though it did have some serious damage it is far from clear that it was beyond repair.

It had the misfortune to be sited on a major intersection of the one way system and we all know that free movement of cars must be put ahead of buildings. There was absolutely no question of people being in the building and thorough shoring up should have ensured public safety.

There is some sort of process for group 1 & 2 listed buildings, plus NZHPT registered buildings – a cursory sort of report by the heritage planners (they are so overwhelmed that the reports are completely perfunctory) – and a report from the NZHPT and/or council engineer, but the Civil Defence Controller has the final say.

I am not sure that NZHPT is fighting too hard anyway from what I can gather – because people have been killed (mainly in modern buildings) they seem to have taken the view that they can’t push hard for heritage.

If the owner can be identified (not always easy) they might be given 24 hours notice so have a chance to argue for a delay. If buildings are unlisted and simply make an important contribution to the character of a precinct, no process is required at all. Nothing at all can be done to try and avert demolition.

There seems to have been some agreement made between Civil Defence and the council staff involved with Civil Defence, that no cordons to protect the public from buildings needing repair will be put in place if they would encroach into a road – as long as they take that view not much will be saved.

As a result of tonight’s meeting a delegation of heritage advocates and business people are going to try and meet the Civil Defence Controller tomorrow to urge a slow down, but whether they will even be granted an appointment is far from certain.

We are meeting again on Friday to plan our next steps, especially if the appeal to the Controller fails to have any impact. The scary thing is the Government can just keep on extending the state of emergency.

{Letter received by What if? on Tuesday, 8 March 2011 11.24pm. Names removed to protect identities. -Eds}

(9.00am) What if? learned the group has been granted a meeting today with the Civil Defence Controller.

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