Tag Archives: DCC Hearings Committee

Zoning issues: Vogel Street activities

76 Vogel Street. Question to Dunedin City Council:
How did this activity happen without a publicly notified plan change?

The ‘warehouse precinct’ referred to in the restaurant’s marketing isn’t recognised by the current Dunedin City District Plan. The building is located within the LSR – Large Scale Retail Zone (see comparative district plan maps below), and the Vogel Street Heritage Precinct (TH13).

Vogel Street “remained zoned for large-scale retail uses, although it was proposed to become a mixed-use zone [the warehouse precinct] – allowing a wider variety of uses” – under the 2GP.

### ODT Online Sat, 23 Jan 2016
Objector to cafe’s licence slammed
By Chris Morris
A Dunedin businessman and his city councillor wife have been labelled “dinosaurs” amid claims they are deliberately standing in the way of the warehouse precinct’s regeneration. The criticism came after it was confirmed yesterday Alistair Broad, a commercial property owner and businessman, had filed an objection opposing the Vogel St Kitchen’s bid to renew its liquor licence.
Read more

Vogel St Kitchen webpage banner [screenshot]

In a former life, the popular Vogel St Kitchen (VSK) was the McIndoe printery. The old brick building has been strengthened and given a new lease of life as a two-level coffee house and licensed eatery. Restaurant proprietor Riah McLean and property owner Lawrie Forbes commissioned a mural by London-based street artist Phlegm for the south exterior wall, visible from the street.

“Dunedin’s coolest destination cafe situated in the heart of the Warehouse Precinct. If you like your coffee and dining to have character and spirit come and check us out.” (publicity)

█ Website: www.vogelstkitchen.co.nz
76 Vogel Street, Dunedin 9016

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Vogel St Kitchen exterior detail

District Plan Maps (2GP) – Compare existing and Second Generation District Plan maps:
District Plan Maps (2GP) - Compare existing and Second Generation District Plan maps

DCC Webmap - 76 Vogel Street, Dunedin [VSK]DCC Rates Information

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Pinnacle Steel: Local company eyes Christchurch rebuild

Pinnacle Steel components 1 [pinnaclesteel.co.nz]

### ODT Online Tue, 17 Sep 2013
Steel firm wants to use Burnside site
By Debbie Porteous
A Dunedin steel fabricator seeking to expand its business and employ more people has applied for resource consent to build on a part of the old Burnside freezing works site in Kaikorai Valley. Pinnacle Steel wants to build a 1500sq m building, accommodating 30 employees, on the corner of Kaikorai Valley and Townleys Rds.
Company shareholder Paul Hickey said it operated from an industrial site in Sturdee St in the city, but that was cramped and the company sought a more suitable site to expand and take on new staff, in response to increased demand for fabricated steel. About 26 staff were employed by the company, but it wanted to start a production line in the new building, and would ”definitely” require more staff.

The demand for steel was coming from Christchurch, and it was expected to continue for years.

A report on the consent application from Dunedin City Council planner Darryl Sycamore to the council’s hearings committee said, according to the company, the site was used by the Burnside freezing works to hold stock and as a reservoir for the meat works’ cooling system.
[The planner] recommends the committee grant consent with conditions, including requirements to plant around the building.
Read more

Pinnacle Steel logo (Dunedin)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images: pinnaclesteel.co.nz – components(1) and logo

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Dunedin: Developers stoop to resource consents instead of private plan change applications

Local resource management consultant/planners such as Allan Cubitt (also an independent commissioner that the Dunedin City Council calls on from time to time) and Don Anderson (Anderson & Co) are ‘chipping away’ at the Dunedin City District Plan zoning provisions with greater insistence out on the Taieri, in (surprise!) Cr Syd Brown’s patch, the Mosgiel Taieri ward.

We have the Veggie Boys application for retrospective resource consent coming to hearing on 10 April (see earlier post, Fresh veggies, a holiday mystery), hosted by Don Anderson. Meanwhile, DCC has allowed Veggie Boys to trade without resource consent since last year. There is some heat on the Council to clarify the planning issues (after a run of five non-notified consents involving Wallis Nurseries ‘destination’ developments, thus the notified application. DCC has sought a legal opinion but refuses to release it.

Veggie Boys Ltd (LUC-2012-563 Resource Consent Application)

There are only three submitters opposing the application. Wider than this application is the matter of “how much leeway” Wallis Nurseries have received from Council to extend their commercial retail activities – of which Veggie Boys is a part – in the rural zone, on high class soils. In particular, the development of ‘Wal’s Plant and Fun Land’ by fragmentary consenting processes, with the potential for cumulative adverse effects arising.

In its repeating, whole-page Easter advertising in the Otago Daily Times, Wal’s boasts there is now a commercial florist on site, and a “Great New Professional Driving Range for Golfers” has opened (a rather average flat farm paddock with cheap distance marking signs – something you’d normally want to crop, in a rural zone)…

It’s clear the land use is changing in a way that undermines the district plan Rural Zone provisions, and all without a private plan change application.

Will granting consent to Veggie Boys set a precedent that (widely) undermines zoning in the District Plan?

If consent is granted to Veggie Boys, is this the (surreptitious) track a supermarket chain would go down to open up for business outside Mosgiel’s Local Activity Area (LA1)? In a word…

****

### ODT Online Tue, 2 Apr 2013
Saddle Hill house sites bid debated
By Debbie Porteous
The Dunedin City Council has been warned that if it grants consent for more residential development on the lower and middle slopes of Saddle Hill, the rest of the hill will soon follow.
But the consulting planner for developers planning two new subdivisions on the hill has told the council’s hearings committee he is not sure people care that much about it.
Read more

Interesting to read Allan Cubitt’s ‘planning’ assault on the Rural Zone, on behalf of developers wanting to subdivide the lower rise of Saddle Hill. To be taken with a pinch of salt, his badass statements include this on the lack of submissions from people living on the Taieri:

”I would suggest that they expect this type of development in this location and are not overly concerned about it, if they ever were … the lower/mid slopes of Saddle Hill do not appear to have a great deal of significance to residents in the area. I suspect the general public realise Dunedin is a hilly place so to restrict elevated building options within the city just because someone may see it, isn’t valid or appropriate.”

There’s a great deal of public sensitivity surrounding the future of Saddle Hill with regards to subdivision and quarrying – it is substantially a district plan zoning and landscape matter.

People leading busy lives – without time, knowledge and resources – should not be buried by DCC’s perpetual paperchase calling for an endless stream of submission-making on resource consents, spatial plan, district plan review, plan changes, whole city and area strategies, or other. On balance, we wouldn’t automatically or superficially conclude similarly to Mr Cubitt.

With Saddle Hill and the Taieri in general, it seems, a plan change process is far preferable to ‘chipping away’ by an ad hoc lingering resource consenting process, to assess the merits of land use (zoning) and to quantify the rural and landscape values for protection(s) against entirely foreseeable, wanton attempts to damage, modify or destroy the existing rural environment (cumulative adverse effects).

City Planning has its work cut out.

Perhaps note the commercial forces lined up in the background to pillage the Taieri Plain, Saddle Hill and Outram areas for Wanaka-like subdivisions (‘dippieville’ strikes again). Probably why you need a Veggie Boys now, to open the gate to was it (open-slather) ‘retail amenity’…

Cr Syd Brown has for years declared his hand in residential subdivision activity, squandering land for housing and own wealth. His developer friends and cousins seem to enjoy (oh so quietly) his ongoing patronage at council – as happens if ‘the movers’ can keep clipping tickets and to hell with high class soils, zoning rules, lack of stormwater drainage from the Mosgiel main street, and lack of appropriate swimming pool amenity, etc.

Cr Brown knows how to back-slap the Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board. We think it’s called control. We suggest Cr Brown has to go in the October elections, especially if through rugby and racing he is a fair-weather friend of Murray Acklin, Queenstown; a gentleman and his files currently under the stare of SFO.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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DCC media release – Harbourside

Dunedin City Council
Media release

Harbourside Progress

Dunedin (Thursday 1 April 2010) – The Council has been advised by the Chair of its Hearings Committee, Cr Colin Weatherall, as its negotiator, that a broad understanding, as a basis for resolving outstanding differences with the appellants to the Harbourside Plan Change 7 proposal, exists final details of which are still being negotiated.

Cr Weatherall has been engaged in discussions with all parties on a ‘confidential without prejudice’ basis in accordance with best practice while, for its part, the Council has maintained a position of not commenting while the appeals process is in train, relying instead on Cr Weatherall’s delegated authority.

At its meeting this Monday 29 March 2010 Cr Weatherall was authorised by the Council to continue to progress the Harbourside negotiations with all the appellants under a confidential protocol until such time as there is a consent order, agreed to by all parties, in place before the Environment Court for its approval.

The purpose of these negotiations is to minimise the matters brought before the Court for its consideration.

The chair of the Council’s Hearings Committee has delegated authority to authorise the negotiation and resolution of appeals under the Resource Management Act.

Given that this process is both on-going and sensitive it is inappropriate for anyone other than the Chair of the Council’s Hearings Committee to make any public comment on how the process is proceeding until such negotiations are completed.

A chronological background, outlining the time-line for realising the Harbourside vision and the resulting Plan Change, follows.

BACKGROUND

The following outlines the time line in developing the harbourside vision and the resulting plan change:

2001:
Consultation on options for Dunedin’s future through “Choices for the Future” in 2001, the community expressed a desire for improved harbour access for both people and vehicles to get to the water, and to enhance harbour amenity.

June 2002:
The Planning and Environment Committee approved a variation to the then Proposed District Plan to provide for the harbourside area.

July 2005:
Draft long term vision for Dunedin’s harbourside launched for public consultation. The vision was refined, options considered and a plan change initiated to facilitate development.

October 2006:
A revised vision and a draft consultation document summarising the principles to be embodied in the plan change were agreed for informal consultation.

October 2007:
The Council resolved to publicly notify Proposed Plan Change 7 and the Notices of Requirement, along with a private plan change to the Regional Plan: Coast.

January 2008:
Proposed District Plan Change 7: Dunedin harbourside was notified alongside six Notices of Requirement to designate land for public squares, walkways and a road alignment included in the Harbourside vision. A decision was subsequently taken, prior to the hearings and in light of concerns raised by submitters, to withdraw three of the designations (No’s 2-4) and to limit the extent of the designation relating to 41 Wharf Street.

The objectives of Plan Change 7 include a Dunedin harbourside that:
• is easily accessible with strong visual and safe physical connections to the city centre, harbour and surrounding areas.
• is a vibrant and attractive place to visit, work and live, with public open spaces along the harbour edge creating a high quality waterfront environment.
• supports a range of compatible land uses that enable the continued operation of Dunedin Port and complement, but do not compete with the vibrancy and vitality of the city centre.
• built form of development creates a liveable environment that reflects and enhances the industrial, maritime and port heritage.

July 2008:
The hearings on Proposed Plan Change 7: Dunedin harbourside and three Notices of Requirement (Fairley Street walkway – northern and southern sections, and 41 Wharf Street roading improvement) were held.

January 2009:
Decisions were released by the Commissioners confirming Plan Change 7 (both Stage 1 and 2) and the designation of the Fairley Street walkway, with modifications. A decision on 41 Wharf Street is yet to be made.

April 2009:
Eight appeals were received on Plan Change 7, two appeals on the Fairley Street walkway – southern section and one appeal on the Fairley Street walkway – northern section. There are also a number of section 274 parties to the proceedings.

PLEASE NOTE: Any further comment on this media statement will be available from the Mayor, Peter Chin, only.



DCC Website Link

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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