Tag Archives: Customers

Dunedin Buses – Route planners don’t consider effects on local business

citibus-dunedin-low-floor-designline-wmc-buswatchnz-blogspot-co-nz-1[buswatchnz.blogspot.co.nz]

With a new central city bus hub proposed for Great King St and further route changes planned, how extensive has council consultation been with local businesses and retailers? We suspect ‘minimal’ if not at all.
Don’t mention car parking.

In the absence of sound economic modelling carried out in public domain – the collective study of cause and effect – ‘top-down’ imposed route changes are the death knell to small business operators and their livelihoods, wrecking the local retail economy, slaying the fabric, busyness and potential diversity of our town centres. Improper unconsulted changes to the bus system problematise or completely sever established movement patterns between our points of congregation. Affordable options for transit and visitation across the city are smashed and disappear. Everybody loses.

█ How much more harm can Otago Regional Council and Dunedin City Council inflict upon the Community of South Dunedin?

Less foot traffic in South Dunedin since changes to bus services.

### ODT Online Sun, 20 Nov 2016
New routes hurting business: retailers
By Greta Yeoman – The Star
Changes to Dunedin’s southern bus routes are affecting business in South Dunedin, shop owners say. The changes to the Mosgiel-Taieri bus routes in June last year led to buses from Green Island being rerouted to travel along the Southern Motorway into the Octagon rather than through South Dunedin. Grey Power Otago president Jo Miller said the new routes meant it was more difficult for customers to get to South Dunedin. […] Other updates to the bus service in August this year had also affected southern bus users. The Ross Creek to Ocean Grove service now travelled directly down Andersons Bay Rd instead of King Edward St. […] When approached by The Star for comment about businesses being affected by the bus routes, Otago Regional Council support services manager Gerard Collings said “that matter hasn’t been raised with us directly”.
Read more

● Gerard Collings [LinkedIn] is the multifarious ‘go-to’ at Otago Regional Council. Mr Collings is experienced in local body administration and community board representation. His profile shows no tertiary qualifications or accredited work experience in urban economics, business development or placemaking.
The Council has provided Mr Collings with a ‘management’ role for public transport planning and operations. He is a national certificate holder (NZTA approved proposal evaluator) – refer to NZTA Procurement Manual, sections 10.19 Qualifications of proposal evaluators and 11.2 Performance measurement and monitoring framework.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

26 Comments

Filed under Business, Democracy, Design, District Plan, Dunedin, Economics, Education, Finance, Geography, Infrastructure, Media, Name, New Zealand, OAG, Ombudsman, ORC, People, Politics, Project management, Proposed 2GP, Public interest, Resource management, South Dunedin, Tourism, Town planning, Transportation, Travesty, Urban design

Thoughts on marketing

Received from Hype O’Thermia
Sun, 8 Jun 2014 at 11:11 am

Strategy guru, Harvard Business School professor Michael Porter was speaking at the World Business Forum in Sydney on Wednesday and highlighted two key features of a good business strategy.
http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/10127196/The-value-of-unhappy-customers

“….1. Choose a distinctive value proposition.

Porter says leaders must decide which customers they are serving and then work out what are the needs of those customers that the business is a “master” at fulfilling.

“We can be pretty good at some things, but what are we going to stand out on? Customer services? Product design? Customisation? Which particular needs of that set of customers do we really want to meet and what price will we ask?”

Leaders should decide what the value proposition is and how it compares with competitors.

“Because, unless we have a unique value proposition, unless we have different answers to these questions than our competitors, then we have no strategy. We are just competing on operational effectiveness,” he says…..”

The university / rugby / stadium would do well to look at that and ask how their “marketing” lines up with that sensible advice.

Tourists and other visitors do not come here for a stadium. Some come here to watch a game, a concert. Where it is held is of little importance. When it’s what they want to see – it’s what they want to see.

Over-filling accommodation and eats and drinks venues once in a while is poor business. It’s a big boom, long bust strategy. It’s temp staff working their guts out, then days and weeks, possibly months, of having short hours and thin paydays.

Amusements as an attraction to students is likely to attract young people who are more interested in prolonged privileged adolescence than the quality of the teaching and research available. Fostering these people as bar clients is an effective way of parting them from their money, at some cost to the rest of us in terms of messy antisocial behaviour, and isn’t doing them any long-term favours. We have seen something in the drive to cater to students, that is not unlike the cynical placement of disproportionate numbers of pokies in low-income suburbs.

[ends]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

2 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Concerts, DCC, Democracy, Design, DVML, Economics, Events, Fun, Geography, Heritage, Innovation, Inspiration, Media, Name, New Zealand, Otago Polytechnic, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Sport, Stadiums, Tourism, University of Otago, Urban design