Tag Archives: Cost-benefit analysis

SH1 Cycleways : the real story

Received from Hilary Calvert
Wed, 22 Feb 2017 12:40 p.m.

[begins]

NZTA has produced a Q and A sheet for their project news update on our cycle lanes along the one-way streets.

An annotated version is provided for reality junkies:

Q: Why is there a need for separated cycleways on the one-way system?

NZTA: Cyclists and pedestrians are over represented in fatal and serious injury crashes. There have been 2 fatalities since 2011. Short-term safety measure were put into place in 2013. Separated cycle lanes are the long-term solution.

Reality: There have been no deaths since the cycle lanes were widened in 2013. The two deaths since 2011 were likely contributed to by the very act of creating cycle lanes in the blind spot of vehicles. Had these cyclists been on the road they would have been safer.

Q: Where else in the country are they using these?

NZTA: These lanes are becoming familiar in major cities including Christchurch. Busy urban routes such as the one-way streets in Dunedin need higher standards of cycle lanes.

Reality: No one in their right mind would direct cyclists to State Highway 1, where all the trucks go. If these two parallel roads were returned to two-way streets, you might put trucks on one and bikes on the other. But this is mad.

Q: Why put the cycleways on the right rather than the left?

NZTA: Because it increases cycle safety and separates them from bus stops.

Reality: Bingo! NZTA has finally realised delivering cyclists to the blind side of trucks is very dangerous. But it was NZTA who chose to do that last time. A simple sorry would be a start.

Q: why not on the right-hand side from Duke St to Otago Museum then?

NZTA: This has been done in response to feedback received and supported by further cycle surveys. And there is a large number of cyclists who use this route who would have to cross the road.

Reality: Really? So feedback overcomes safety? Surely this brings into question whether they really understand the safety issues with the left-hand side. WE all know that cyclists are no different from the rest of us, they will take their bikes on the shortest route they can find. Which will mean that they are spending most of their time not on the new cycle lane. Actually, most of their time will be spent walking around campus because the University won’t let cyclists inside – safety issues, apparently.

Q: What impact will this have on parking?

NZTA: Keeping the cycle lanes on the unsafe side of the road will mean we lose 20 fewer parks. Parking will be provided in high demand areas. (see revised plans).

Reality: We will lose hundreds of parks, particularly in the highest parking areas around the hospital (made worse by the DCC proposal to build on the car parking area at Frederick St). Parking is already squeezed in high demand areas. These guys are in la la land, and I don’t mean the award winning movie.

Q: Will these cycle lanes disrupt traffic flows?

NZTA: The lanes are likely to smooth traffic flows and provide more reliable travel times because there will be fewer parking movements.

Reality: Yes more reliably longer times, which are likely to double for anyone using the one-way streets. More phases for cyclists and pedestrians, more traffic trying to find parks, more time needed to get to hospital appointments. It wasn’t that broke. Why are those from out of town so determined to get in the way of traffic in Dunedin?

Q: How many cyclists are likely to use the cycle lanes?

NZTA: Current usage peaks at 500 per day, but this could easily double. We will measure the change.

Reality: Weasel words. Try looking north from Lower Stuart St along the one-way street. There will be several vehicles on the cycle lanes and likely not even 1 cyclist. The reality is that we are likely to have fewer than 1 cyclist per kilometre of cycleway in Dunedin at any one time. The maximum of 500 is not relevant to the usage in general. (And indeed 500 per day is 500 over 1440 minutes, about one every 3 minutes. At the absolute peak. For a moment in time. So it may double to 1 cyclist at the absolute maximum every 1.5 minutes.) And having measured it later, we are still stuck with the cycle lanes even if they don’t create double the usage. Meanwhile there is no proposed monitoring of the time wasted on getting to hospital appointments, or the time spent by students walking further from free car parking to lectures, or any other flow-on effects of decreased parking where it is currently available.

Q: When is work likely to start?

NZTA: May 2017, taking around 15 months and in such a way as to ensure the one-way system is able to operate effectively and any disruption is kept to a minimum.

Reality: These streets are groaning at the seams already. Our entire one-way system will become impossible to operate usefully, and it will take double the time. By this time those who came to Dunedin because the traffic wasn’t so bad will have the start of every working day diminished and their Dunedin experience effectively destroyed around the central city. We have an elderly population, and this will be the last three years of the lives of some of us.

Q: Who pays and what will it cost?

NZTA: NZTA will pay for the work directly related to the cycle lanes. $8million.

Reality: More weasel words. There are large costs not included in the direct costs. Agencies are keen on doing guestimates of the multiplier effect of benefits to the city for, say, acts at the stadium. What about a study of the likely costs to the city of loss of parking revenue, loss of time spent driving around, loss of time spent walking from vehicles, anxiety around hospital appointments, loss of business for those relying on easy car access for their custom etc. There are also costs for the work connecting roads and footpaths etc between the cycleways and the rest of our DCC infrastructure, and the inevitable landscaping in the vicinity. And then the costs of fixing what we had to redo because none of the agencies are working together. An expensive nightmare.

Q: What is being done to provide more integrated transport in Dunedin?

NZTA: NZTA, DCC and ORC are implementing transport related projects: this is one. These cycle lanes will connect with cycling lanes being considered in North Dunedin linking University, Hospital, Otago Polytechnic and the CBD.

Reality: These institutions are already handy to each other. As regards the University the biggest obstacle to cycling is the size of the campus which cannot be crossed by cyclists.

****

Pity NZTA doesn’t have a booth in the heart of Dunedin where they could come and sit and listen to the issues. Perhaps on the corner of Stuart St and the one-way streets?

[ends]

NZTA Dunedin Urban Cycleways Programme
Cycling in Dunedin contributes to improving transport options, providing a more efficient and integrated transport network, improving health, economic and social outcomes and city liveability. The Urban Cycleways Fund, subject to council approval, will help to accelerate the City to Harbour Bridge and the Central City and North East Valley cycle network.

NZTA Urban Cycleways Programme [general information]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

█ GREEN ATTACK ON YOUR BUILT ENVIRONMENT

leisure-cyclist-on-beach-road-cycleway-auckland-nzta-govt-nz-1two-way-separated-cycleway-beach-road-auckland-nzta-govt-nzTwo-way separated cycleway on Beach Road, Auckland [nzta.govt.nz]

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Filed under Business, Construction, Cycle network, DCC, Democracy, Design, District Plan, Dunedin, Economics, Education, Finance, Geography, Health, Hot air, Infrastructure, Name, New Zealand, NZTA, People, Pet projects, Politics, Project management, Property, Proposed 2GP, Public interest, Resource management, Sport, Tourism, Town planning, Transportation, Travesty, University of Otago, Urban design, What stadium

Ratepayers, another windfall —Fifa under-20 World Cup 2015

Otago Stadium 1

Fifa NZ U20 WC logo [tourismnewzealand.com]### ODT Online Thu, 15 Aug 2013
Dunedin to host FIFA U-20 World Cup games
Dunedin will be a host venue for the biggest football tournament to be held in New Zealand.
Forsyth Barr Stadium will host games in the 2015 Fifa world under-20 tournament, organisers confirmed today. Auckland, Hamilton, Christchurch, New Plymouth, Wellington and Whangarei are also hosting games. Read more

Wow. The Spooks have worked overtime on this release, fired by opinion (and even a footnote of purpose) —not, ratepayer budgets.

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Dunedin Confirmed as a Host City for FIFA’s Second Biggest Tournament

This item was published on 15 Aug 2013.

With just under two years until kick off in the first match of the FIFA U-20 World Cup New Zealand 2015, FIFA and the New Zealand Football Local Organising Committee (LOC) have confirmed that Dunedin will play a significant role in the tournament.
Dunedin will host seven matches altogether, including a Round of 16 clash (the round before the quarter finals). All of the games will be played under the roof of Otago Stadium.
The naming of Dunedin as a host city followed a robust selection process where a total of 7 successful cities were named – Auckland, Wellington, Hamilton, Whangarei, Christchurch and New Plymouth.
Mayor of Dunedin Dave Cull is delighted the city will be participating in one of world football’s premier events.

“This is a wonderful outcome for the city and will be a great opportunity to showcase Dunedin to players, officials and supporters. Hosting 2011 Rugby World Cup matches in Dunedin means we are well equipped to deal with another high-profile international event. We can build on what we learnt hosting RWC matches and will be working closely with Football South and other stakeholders to ensure we get the maximum effect from the event and give visitors to the city a fantastic welcome.”

Mr Cull says the city has negotiated excellent value for the ratepayers with FIFA although the terms of the arrangement will remain confidential at this time.

“Due to the considerable work done by staff, we are confident it is a sound investment.”

Darren Burden, CEO, Dunedin Venues, the company which operates Otago Stadium, is thrilled Dunedin will feature in the tournament.

“Our Stadium is an ideal football venue for players and spectators alike and, with the internationally significant scale of this event, it’s a privilege to host top class football under the roof. This announcement reinforces the importance of having an outstanding venue as a draw card to host international sporting events. I think we’re all in for a sporting spectacular in 2015.”

As for Rugby World Cup 2011, Dunedin’s Stadium will be known as Otago Stadium for the lead up to and duration of the tournament to meet FIFA’s clean sponsorship rules.
Matthew Holdridge, Chair of the FootballSouth Board, says, “On behalf of all the players, supporters, and administrators in the FootballSouth region, I would like to express our delight at the fantastic news Dunedin will host seven matches at the 2015 FIFA U-20 World Cup.

“This is a major event for our Football Federation, one that, if we missed, may not have come around again in our lifetime. I know our football community is keen to be part of this event. FootballSouth will be working closely with FIFA and the Local Organising Committee to ensure our 7,800 affiliated football members and the wider community gets as many opportunities as possible to engage with the event and the teams playing at Otago Stadium.”

Dave Beeche, CEO FIFA U-20 World Cup 2015, is full of praise for all of the cities that were involved in the bidding process and feels that having access to a covered stadium adds significantly to the tournament.

“We’d like to thank all of the cities that put in a bid to host matches for their work over the last year to get to this point. The feedback from FIFA was very positive following the recent site inspection tour and they are looking forward to a highly successful tournament in 2015. With the tournament being played during the winter, it’s fantastic to have a full covered stadium as it means we’ll have ideal pitch conditions and visitors will have another good reason to head south. The FIFA delegates were very impressed with Otago Stadium and see the roof as a major benefit given the timing of the tournament. To have seven stunning venues locked in nearly two years out from the first match gives us a great planning timeframe and we’ll use all of it to ensure that a standout event is delivered. This tournament has a huge global following and that’s the opportunity we have with this event – to deliver exposure for New Zealand and host regions, both directly during the tournament and via a massive international television audience. With the world’s best footballing talent on display and stadiums full of colour, noise, and atmosphere, it will be a new experience for New Zealand that everyone will want to be a part of.”

Altogether the tournament will host 24 national teams, include 52 matches, and will run for three weeks from 30 May until 20 June 2015. This is during the local football season, which will provide a great opportunity for the sport’s large youth playing base to be inspired by the world’s best players. With an average of three goals scored per game in the last three FIFA U-20 World Cup tournaments this will be dynamic, exciting football at its best.
The tournament will be broadcast to more than 100 countries and a global television audience of more than 170 million people[1], providing exposure for the tournament, the host cities, and New Zealand on a massive scale. It is estimated more than 7,000 overseas fans will pour into New Zealand for the tournament and to support their teams.

FIFA Factsheet (PDF, 188.2 KB)

[1] Based on the FIFA U-20 World Cup Columbia 2011 Television Audience Report produced for FIFA TV by KantraSport

Contact Mayor of Dunedin on 477 4000.

DCC Link

Related Posts and Comments:
25.10.12 Council bid lacks cost/benefit analysis: Fifa under-20 World Cup 2015
7.12.11 D Scene: Cull and councillors captured by Fifa bid, it will cost

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: tourismnewzealand.com – NZ U20 WC logo

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Portobello Road Consultation —Public Meeting | Monday 13 May

Portobellomeeting copy

Here is the latest web update for the Portobello Community.

This week we look at the road widening project and the proposed changes that the City Council has made to the initial plan. The City Council will be giving the community another opportunity to have your say on the proposal and the changes they have made to the plan since the consultation period in March 2013. This is an important issue for our township and community and the meeting is to be held at 7:00 pm on Monday, 13 May 2013 at the Coronation Hall. Pass this message onto your friends, neighbours, colleagues and whanau.

Regards
Paul Pope – Chairman, Portobello Incorporated

● The meeting will be attended by council staff, Cr Jinty MacTavish, and Otago Peninsula Community Board members.

Related Post and Comments:
28.3.13 | Updated 29.3.13
DCC Draft Annual Plan 2013/14: Portobello Harington Point Road Improvements Project

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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DCC Draft Annual Plan 2013/14: Portobello Harington Point Road Improvements Project

Updated Post 29.3.13

Received yesterday by email.

Something that seems to have slipped the radar in Dunedin news of late is the WIDENING of Portobello Harington Point Road on the Otago Peninsula.

Looking at the Draft Annual Plan, the City Council intends to spend the following on what amounts to an environmental and heritage damaging folly. That’s only 33-34 % of the budget, given NZTA will subsidise the remaining 66-67% of the project.

DCC Draft Annual Plan - Road widening[click on image to enlarge]

See page 24, Section 1 Group of Activities (PDF, 1.5 MB)
and page 142, Section 2 Financial Statements (PDF, 1.2 MB)

The road widening (including the Vauxhall and Macandrew Bay areas already completed) will reclaim nearly 11 hectares of the Otago Harbour — a conservative measurement given plans show significantly more reclamation if the topography requires it.

Consultation on the current design closed yesterday, Thursday 28 March, indicating approval of the plan is a given despite the consultation process for the Annual Plan this year and in years to come.

[29.3.13 – The plans are not available for viewing online, why not?]

There will be irrevocable damage to the Peninsula and Harbour landscape, heritage features and the ecology if this misguided piece of engineering continues.

It is feared the Council has the bit between its teeth on this project — described as being about “liveability”, according to Mayor Cull at the Portobello Annual Plan ‘roadshow’.

It might be worth pointing out to your readers that they look closely at the Draft Annual Plan in regards to this area of Council expenditure.

Searching Council for cost benefit and recreational analyses fails to show much other than what is in the June 2008 Cycle Strategy (PDF, 787 KB).

[See also: Dunedin’s Proposed Cycle Network, adopted August 2011]

Few will have problems with the desirability of access, but the lack of design sensitivity and impact on the values of the area seem inconsistent with the value of the Peninsula and Harbour to the community and our economy.

This is certainly an issue worth looking at more deeply.

[ends]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Council bid lacks cost/benefit analysis: Fifa under-20 World Cup 2015

Interesting. DCC and DVML aren’t sharing information on the cup bid. General manager Sue Bidrose looks like a fool again (perhaps she is), and Darren is Darren. Nevertheless, all councillors are responsible for the lack of a full cost/benefit analysis.

### ODT Online Thu, 25 Oct 2012
Code clash with cash implications
By Chris Morris
The Highlanders could be kicked for touch, and the company running the Forsyth Barr Stadium left out of pocket, if Dunedin secures a share of hosting rights for the Fifa under-20 World Cup in 2015. That was because Fifa required exclusive use of all tournament venues, beginning 10 days before each venue’s first match and continuing until a day after the last match, tournament organising committee interim project manager Peter O’Hara said. That could mean a clash between Fifa’s tournament and the Super 15 rugby competition at stadiums around New Zealand, as the two tournaments would overlap.

[Dunedin Venues Management Ltd chief executive Darren Burden] did not yet know the details of Dunedin’s bid, which was being handled by the Dunedin City Council, but hoped “sensible solutions could be found”.

The council was expected to contribute up to $450,000 towards Fifa’s tournament costs if its bid was successful, but council city strategy and development manager Sue Bidrose said that was if the city won the right to host a number of matches, including the final. The cost could be reduced if the city’s bid was only partially successful, but the true cost – including lost revenue if other stadium events were disrupted – was not known, she said.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Submission to DCC draft long term plan (2)

By Bev Butler

The Long Term Plan [2012/2022] as a document is only beneficial to the community when it fully incorporates the probable financial outcomes for the city. This Long Term Plan has not taken into account the financial future of the stadium. (The DVML six-monthly report has been delayed until after submissions close). The DVML report will reveal that the stadium is running at a multimillion dollar loss and it is now time to do a cost-benefit analysis of whether it is financially viable for the stadium to remain open or not. The results of a cost-benefit analysis of the stadium would then put the city in a clearer position to then make decisions for the future. The city in its present overwhelming debt situation can ill-afford to continue to sustain the stadium multimillion dollar losses. The Council has been capitalising interest for the last few years to the tune of over $40m. This situation if allowed to continue will eventually result in bankruptcy.

The main anchor tenant of the stadium (the ORFU) is technically insolvent and has already come to Council requesting a bailout. The Dunedin ratepayers cannot afford to keep on bailing out the ORFU. It will not be long before the ORFU again request another bailout. This has been the pattern over many years. I have no confidence that the ORFU bailout conditions will be met just as the stadium conditions were not met (see attached spreadsheet).

The council has to change its mindset that ‘what is good for Otago rugby is good for Dunedin/ Otago.’ Clearly, on a financial basis, this has not been true for many years. It is not the DCC’s role to continually ‘wet nurse’ the rugby interests in this town by caving in to their repeated, self=destructive mode of operating. Namely, their calling on public funds when they get into financial trouble.

It has become clearer as Official Information has been released that the process that led to the building of the stadium was corrupt. I request that the Council instigate a full independent inquiry into the whole stadium project so that those responsible for misleading the community are held to account. Until this happens the stadium will continue to divide the community.
Continue reading

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