Tag Archives: Consumers

NZ road deaths [repeat flouting of Road Code] + Self-driving car technology

“It’s horrific. What’s meant to be a festive and family time have been completely shattered by these accidents.” –Greally

### NZ Herald 6:21 AM Wednesday Jan 4, 2017
Holiday road toll ends, 19 dead
Nineteen people lost their lives on New Zealand roads over the Christmas and New Year period. The youngest victim was 2-years-old. The official holiday road toll ended at 6am today. It began on Friday, December 23. Last year’s holiday road toll saw 12 people killed on New Zealand roads, with 71 people seriously injured and 296 minor injuries, according to the Ministry of Transport. […] National road policing manager Steve Greally said earlier the high number of deaths was disappointing and devastating for families.
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NZTA Road death statistics

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Published on Dec 13, 2016
Meet the Blind Man Who Convinced Google Its Self-Driving Car Is Finally Ready | WIRED
Google is getting serious about self-driving cars. So serious that it put a legally blind man in one that drove him around safely on his own. The successful trip means that the tech giant can now launch its own self-driving car company, which it’s calling Waymo.

Consumers will probably get their first taste of automated driving in the backseat of a robo-taxi.

### bloomberg.com ‎3‎ ‎Jan ‎2017‎ ‎1‎:‎01‎ ‎p.m.‎ ‎NZDT
It’s Aye, Robot, as Driverless Cars Finally Steer Near Showrooms
By Keith Naughton and Mark Bergen
● 140 CES exhibitors from Google to Audi seek auto-tech buyers
● Autonomy is ‘next major battlefield’ for global automakers
Car electronics supplier Delphi Automotive Plc went coast-to-coast in 2015 in a self-driving Audi Q5 sport-utility vehicle to prove the autonomous automobile had arrived. Now, Delphi is shifting from stunts to selling. In Las Vegas this week at CES, formerly known as the Consumer Electronics Show, the company will give test rides to hundreds of potential customers in driverless Audis over a course of rugged terrain and tunnels. The goal: to walk away from this critical conclave with a handful of hot prospects for its self-driving system. “The last two years at CES have been more about just showcasing the technology and saying, ‘Look what it can do,'” said Glen De Vos, Delphi’s vice president of advanced engineering. “This year, the discussion is all about the path to production.” Self-driving cars are finally making the leap from the lab to the showroom. Tesla Motors Inc., BMW, Ford Motor Co. and Volvo Cars have all promised to have fully autonomous cars on the road within five years. Alphabet Inc. just spun off its Google Self-Driving Car Project, renaming it Waymo, and then promptly unveiled its driverless Chrysler Pacifica minivan and said it’s in discussions to put its technology into Honda Motor Co. models. When CES officially opens Jan. 5, the talk won’t be about proving technology — it will be about selling to automakers, ride-hailing companies, transit services and, ultimately, consumers.
At a show once known for mobile phones and video games, vehicle technology will cover an exhibit space the size of four football fields, some 21 percent more than last year. Some 138 auto-tech exhibitors will all be seeking a piece of the autonomy business that Boston Consulting Group says will increase to $42 billion by 2025 and account for a quarter of global sales by 2035. And since it takes about four years to bring a car to market, now is the time to cut deals with suppliers and tech partners to outfit models with self-driving systems that will debut early next decade.
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█ For a QuickTake on issues surrounding driverless cars, click here.

[click to enlarge]

bloomberg-quicktake-driverless-cars-20-10-16

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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New building laws —happy new year!

Hut on Sleds, Coromandel Peninsula - Crosson Clarke Carnachan ArchitectsHut on sleds at Coromandel Peninsula | Crosson Clarke Carnachan Architects

### tvnz.co.nz 6:03PM Wednesday December 31, 2014 Source: ONE News
Construction cowboys watch out
Source: Breakfast
New building laws targeting construction cowboys are coming into force on New Year’s Day. Builders on big jobs have to be more open with clients or risk being fined. Every building job costing more than $30,000 will now need to be covered by a detailed contract.
“That’s going to have to outline your rights, their obligations, including the value of the work, when it’s going to start, when it’s likely to finish [and] if there’s any problems how you’ll resolve them,” says Sue Chetwin, Consumer chief executive.
Before they can start work, builders will also have to reveal their skills and qualifications, what sort of warranty is on offer and their level of insurance cover. And they’ll have to provide a checklist, setting out the client’s rights and explaining the building process. Failure to comply with any of the new rules will attract a fine of $500.
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Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment —
Building & Housing Information

Building Amendment Act 2013

Changes to the dam scheme
New Consumer protection measure
More information

The Building Amendment Act 2013 was passed by Parliament on 27 November 2013. It is the result of a comprehensive review into the Building Act 2004.

This Amendment Act is part of a package of changes which introduce new measures to improve the building and construction sector, ensuring that it delivers good quality, affordable homes and buildings and contributes to a prosperous economy.

New Zealand lawyers Buddle Findlay on Strengthening consumer protection measures in the Building Act (11.7.14):
Building and Construction Minister Dr Nick Smith announced yesterday that, from 1 January 2015, building contractors will be required to have written contracts, provide information on their relevant skills, experience and qualifications, and disclose their insurance and warranty cover for residential building work valued at over $30,000.
These new requirements are part of the wider consumer protection measures introduced in November last year by the Building Amendment Act 2013 (the Act), which will also come into force on 1 January 2015, and which strengthen the consumer protection measures currently contained in the Building Act 2004 (Building Act).
We consider that the consumer protection measures in the Act are a major evolution to consumers’ rights in the residential construction industry. The government is aiming for these legislative changes to have a significant impact on the way the industry operates – a fundamental behavioural change on the part of both consumers and building contractors.
The purpose of the consumer protection measures in the Act is to move away from the heavy reliance on building consent authorities for building quality and incentivise building professionals and trades people to take responsibility for the quality of their work and to stand behind it.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Shopping Malls – United States

Thanks to wirehunt for this link.

### theatlanticcities.com Jul 13, 2012
Urban Wonk
The Shopping Mall Turns 60 (and Prepares to Retire)
By Emily Badger
The enclosed suburban shopping mall has become so synonymous with the American landscape that it’s hard to imagine the original idea for it ever springing from some particular person’s imagination. Now the scheme seems obvious: of course Americans want to amble indoors in a million square feet of air-conditioned retail, of course we will need a food court because so much shopping can’t be done without meal breaks, and of course we will require 10,000 parking spaces ringing the whole thing to accommodate all our cars. The classic indoor mall, however, is widely credited with having an inventor. And when the Vienna-born architect Victor Gruen first outlined his vision for it in a 1952 article in the magazine Progressive Architecture, the plan was a shocker. Most Americans were still shopping downtown, and suburban “shopping centers”, to the extent they existed, were most definitely not enclosed in indoor mega-destinations.

At the mall’s peak popularity, in 1990, America opened 19 of them. But we haven’t cut the ribbon on a new one since 2006.

Gruen’s idea transformed American consumption patterns and much of the environment around us. At age 60, however, the enclosed regional shopping mall also appears to be an idea that has run its course (OK, maybe not in China, but among Gruen’s original clientele). He opened the first prototype in Edina, Minnesota, in 1956, and the concept spread from there (this also means the earliest examples of the archetypal American mall are now of age for historic designation, if anyone wants to make that argument).
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● Emily Badger is a contributing writer to The Atlantic Cities. She also writes for Pacific Standard, and her work has appeared in GOOD, The Christian Science Monitor, and The New York Times. She lives in the Washington, D.C. area.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southdale_Center

Southdale (b.1956) two overlays – WAI Architecture Think Tank

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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