Tag Archives: Conservation

Prison revives for visitor experience

### ODT Online Sat, 29 Apr 2017
Tourism intended for prison
By David Loughrey
Dunedin’s old prison has four new trustees, a new tenant with the tourism market in mind, and is ready to move to a new stage in its evolution. The 121-year-old Victorian-style courtyard facility designed by John Campbell has been returned to its original form. Work to replace decorative architectural elements removed from the front of the building was completed recently. Now the Dunedin Prison Charitable Trust is turning its attention to future uses for the former jail that is one of the city’s more unusual historic buildings. The prison was decommissioned in 2007, and the trust bought the property in 2012. Trust chairman Owen Graham said the physical restoration work was 95% complete — ridge tiles and two 2-metre finials still had to be finished — but it was time to start a new stage of evolution for the building. The new trustees had been appointed for their range of skills and backgrounds, and would help the trust make decisions about what happened next. Those decisions could range from another part-upgrade or “go for a multimillion-dollar effort”. […] Mr Graham said part of the trust’s strategy was to start occupying parts of the prison to sustain its activities and “bring the prison back to life with different activities”. It had been working with a business that wanted to use the prison’s kitchen, which had been identified as “serviceable”.
Read more

The former prison has a Heritage New Zealand category one classification; future development involves discussion with Dunedin City Council and Heritage New Zealand.

Dunedin Prison | http://www.dunedinprisontrust.co.nz/

[excerpt from the trust’s website]

Timeline
Showing the many phases of use of the prison:
1896-1915 – new prison opened with cells for 52 men and 20 women
1915-1959 – Police move in to administration block and look after prisoners as well as their own duties
1959-1974 – 34 female prisoners are accommodated, segregated from men
1975-1994 – reopened catering for 59 male inmates
1994-2000 – Police move out to their new premises and prison reverts to original purpose as a men only facility
2007 – prison decommissioned and Corrections operation moved to Milburn
2011 – Dunedin Prison Charitable Trust formed to secure the prison for the nation
2012 – Dunedin Prison Charitable Trust raises $50,000 to allow it to purchase the property from Ngai Tahu Property Ltd
2014 – Conservation Plan completed
2015 – Fund-raising begins to allow us to restore the facades and repair part of the slate roof, estimated at $500,000.

Related Posts and Comments:
17.9.15 Dunedin Prison: Community Trust grant for restoration
16.9.15 DPAG exhibition talk, Sun 20 Sep —Jonathan Howard on Dunedin 1865
7.9.15 Public petition to save Courthouse for courts use
30.8.15 DPAG exhibition | Dunedin 1865: A City Rises…
23.8.15 1865 Dunedin —Heritage Festival 2015 ‘The Open City’ … 29 Aug
23.8.15 1865 Dunedin —Heritage Festival 2015 Shoreline Trail launch
11.7.15 Dunedin Law Courts “an incredible historic building” –Minister
14.5.15 Russell Lund on Ministry closure of Dunedin Law Courts
14.5.15 Justice at Dunedin
2.5.15 Ministry serves INJUSTICE for Dunedin Courthouse #HistoricHeritage
28.2.13 Tour the old prison in March (2013)
20.9.12 Dunedin Prison
6.6.12 Dunedin Prison purchased by trust
18.10.11 Dunedin Prison Charitable Trust
5.10.11 Training, jobs, city regeneration

█ For more, enter the term *heritage* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

*Images: whatifdunedin sketchbook – Dunedin Prison (former)

5 Comments

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ODT feature : Streets of gold #Dunedin

In case you missed the ODT four-part series on Dunedin’s residential heritage in late December….. here it is, via Dave Cannan’s The Wash (Facebook).




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█ The four parts, abridged for quick reference and linked here below, had an excellent (research) information follow-up by Kim Dungey.

Some very approximate dates have been added care of Quality Value (QV), these are based on (limited) property records held by councils; as well as year dates for historical architects, where known.

Streets of Gold, a Summer Times series celebrating Dunedin’s rich architectural heritage. In collaboration with Heritage New Zealand researchers Heather Bauchop and Susan Irvine, with additional research by David Murray, archivist, Hocken Collections; and Alison Breese, archivist, Dunedin City Council.

### ODT Online Tue, 27 Dec 2016
Streets of gold: High St
High Street has an association with the medical profession dating back to the 1880s, when the Mornington cable car started running and some impressive new houses were built along its route.

CAVENDISH CHAMBERS, 211 High St.
The company behind the venture, Medical Buildings Ltd, was incorporated on March 1, 1926, and the shareholders all took professional rooms in the new property. The building was completed in 1927. Architect: Eric Miller (1896-1948).

236 HIGH ST
This prominent residence (QV: c.1900?) with a turret and projecting windows was designed in 1888 for Scottish-born Dr Frank Ogston. Ogston gained his medical degree in Aberdeen and emigrated to Dunedin in 1886 to take up a position as a lecturer in medical jurisprudence and hygiene at the University of Otago. Architect: Henry Hardy (1830-1908), and builder-developer.

238 HIGH ST
An Arts and Crafts-style design, the house (QV: c.1909?) is finished in roughcast with brick exposed on the ground floor sills. It was built for Dr D.E. Williams and his family as a private residence and doctor’s surgery and was home to the Williams family until the 1960s. Architect: Basil Hooper (1876-1960).

296 HIGH ST
Built in 1904, the Chalet Hospital (a private facility) was described as being “finished in coloured and tuck-pointed brickwork … the whole of the relief and ornament is carried out in bold cornices over the windows”. Architect: John Louis Salmond (1868-1950).

Read more + Photos

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### ODT Online Tue, 27 Dec 2016
Streets of gold: York Pl
York Place features two large homes once owned by members of the Speight family.

LARBERT VILLA – 371 York Pl
It is unclear exactly when the villa was built. Coppersmith Alexander Burt, of A and T Burt, married Janet Crawford in 1866 (they had a family of six sons and three daughters) and the couple were living in York Pl by July 1868 when Janet gave birth to a son at the house.

FORMER SPEIGHT RESIDENCE – 362 York Pl
Built for Jessie and Charles Speight after their marriage in 1898, the residence appears in the Dunedin City Council rates records in the 1899-1900 year. Architect: J.L. Salmond.

HAEATA – 273 York Pl
The residence of Charles and Jessie Speight from the time it was built in 1915, it remained in the Speight family until 1960. Bearing a strong resemblance to the Theomin family’s Olveston (built 1907, designed by Sir Ernest George). Architect: John Brown (1875-1923), a neighbour.

MRS TURNBULL’S GROCERY STORE – 324 York Pl
Known more than a century ago as Mrs Turnbull’s Grocery Store, this unusual wedge-shaped building began life as a home, stables and shop built for John and Janet Turnbull in 1875. In January 1875 tenders were invited for a two-storey dwelling and shop to be constructed of wood. Architect and Surveyor: E.J. Sanders [aka Saunders].

Read more + Photos

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### ODT Online Wed, 28 Dec 2016
Streets of gold: Highgate
Highgate has a fascinating and storied collection of prominent dwellings.

RENFREW HOUSE – 111 Highgate
Thought to have originated as a single-storey bluestone house with a central front door and double hung windows on each side. A second storey was later added. The exterior walls were built of double stone – more than 70cm thick – and the interior walls of double brick. With its wrought iron lacework, it has been described as one of the “finest examples of classic Victorian architecture in Dunedin”. Home of businessman Andrew McFarlane (1842-1904) and his wife Jane Wilson (1847-1920). By the 1890s, the family referred to their home as “Renfrew House”. Architect: credited to Nathaniel Wales (1832-1903), a neighbour.
 
KAWARAU – 204 Highgate
Designed in 1900 for dredging tycoon Alexander McGeorge, this grand residence reflects the fortunes made in Otago’s gold dredging boom of the late 1890s and early 20th century. Trained at Dunedin firm Cossens and Black, McGeorge (1868-1953) held a variety of significant engineering posts. The two-storeyed house is built of brick, has a slate roof, ornate decorative detailing, and features Tudor influences in the half timbering and veranda details. Architect: J.L. Salmond.

FORMER HUXTABLE RESIDENCE – 233 Highgate
This 1907 brick and tile residence designed for Anna and Alexander Huxtable, is a beautifully detailed example of an Edwardian villa, one with historic and architectural significance. Anna Huxtable was granted the land in 1907; a survey on May 15, 1907, indicates the foundations for the new dwelling were already in place at that date. (QV: c.1910?). Alexander Murray Huxtable described himself as both a commercial agent and patent medicine manufacturer. Architect: Edward Walden (1870-1944).

MELROSE – 384 Highgate
Likely designed for lawyer Arthur Nation (1852-1927) around 1876. In October that year, tenders were called for the construction of a “brick cottage” in the suburb of Melrose (a private subdivision in what is now known as Roslyn). However, Nation appears to have built more than a cottage: when his property was offered for sale in 1879 it was described as “a substantially-built and well-finished brick house”, its original features including hand-painted ceilings, timber joinery and stained glass. Architect: credited to John McGregor (1838-1911), and harbour engineer.

Read more + Photos

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### ODT Online Thu, 29 Dec 2016
Streets of gold: Royal Tce
Royal Terrace has a fascinating and storied collection of prominent dwellings.

DAISY BANK – 12 Royal Tce
Associated with the prominent Hudson family. An Italianate, two-storeyed symmetrical house with a large basement, “Daisy Bank” was built of concrete and wood, circa 1897. Architect: J.A. Burnside (1856-1920).

LINDEN – 22 Royal Tce
Built in the 1870s, a two-storied, two-bay Victorian residence of more than 15 rooms, with an exterior comprising plastered triple brick with quoins, foundations of Leith Valley andesite and a slate roof. Associated with the prominent Isaacs and Hudson families. Architect: Mason and Wales (likely Nathaniel Wales).

CLAVERTON – 30 Royal Tce
Associated with prominent local politician and businessman Richard H. Leary and one of New Zealand’s most prominent artistic families, the Hodgkins. Claverton was most likely built in 1877 by local politician and businessman Richard H. Leary (1840-95). Architect: likely Maxwell Bury (1825-1912).

ALYTH – 34 Royal Tce
Built in the 1870s by prominent businessman, community leader and one-time Dunedin mayor Keith Ramsay (1844-1906). Named Alyth after Ramsay’s birth place, the house was completed, at the latest, by March 1875. Architect: Robert Arthur Lawson (1833-1902).

Read more + Photos

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It doesn’t have to be a mansion located on the high streets….

crabapple-cottage-otago-peninsula-thecuriouskiwi-co-nzCrabapple Cottage, Otago Peninsula [thecuriouskiwi.co.nz]

Lastly, a THOROUGHLY USEFUL guide for those unfamiliar with historic heritage archives, technical sources and search methods.

### ODT Online Fri, 30 Dec 2016
What is your house hiding?
By Kim Dungey
Enjoyed this week’s Streets of Gold series, in which we have profiled various Dunedin houses of historic significance? Fancy playing detective and tracing the history of your home? … In recent years, Heritage New Zealand has run “how to research your home” workshops in Dunedin, Invercargill, Oamaru and Central Otago. The popular seminars have drawn together the sources it uses every day to tell the story of historic places. Archivists say some people want to restore their homes to their original states, are curious about former owners or simply want to know the age of their houses for insurance purposes. Others require archaeological assessments of pre-1901 properties or have reported seeing ghosts in their homes and wanted to work out who they might be. Interested homeowners have a wealth of resources at their fingertips….
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

5 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Design, Dunedin, Education, Geography, Heritage, Heritage NZ, Housing, Inspiration, Media, Museums, New Zealand, Property, Public interest, Site, Tourism, What stadium

Roy Miller, NZ stained glass artist #biography #inspiration

*All images and accompanying texts by Brian Miller [promotion]

roy-miller-mt-cook-with-figure-sewing-seed-by-brian-miller-detail-11890994_911731092253708_6070668448044356513_n

“St John’s church in the attractive little town of Pleasant Point, South Canterbury, has a window of a man sowing seed beneath Mt Cook. Designed by K Bunton, executed by Roy Miller.”

roy-miller-daisies-by-brian-miller-detail-11891061_912412288852255_1646043659992482757_n

“In a valley near Geraldine at Raincliff, New Zealand, is a tiny church with a beautiful abstract window of native NZ flowers. Designed by Kenneth Bunton, and executed by Roy Miller.”

roy-miller-sheep-by-brian-mioller-11953056_915934751833342_1298773690406499181_n

“Naseby is a sleepy little Gold mine town nestled in a forest in Otago, New Zealand. There you will find St Georges Church with beautiful stained glass inside. It contains a pair of windows designed by Kenneth Bunton and executed by Roy Miller – with one of the best sheep I have seen in my travels.”

roy-miller-mount-taranaki-by-brian-miller-detail-11822528_902927373134080_2489800972208562017_n

“There is a tiny church at Manutahi on the edge of Mt Taranaki which only has one service a year – but inside is the most beautiful window of the mountain – took my breath away when I saw it.”

A new book aims to shine a light on Dunedin stained-glass maestro Roy Miller. He came from a family boasting a history of artists and artisans. Roy’s (and Ralph’s) grandfather, Henry Miller, was a master coachbuilder whose hansom cabs won several championship awards at the Melbourne Exhibition. Their father, Oswell, established Dunedin signwriting firm O. G. Miller in 1913; it became Miller Studios in 1958, then in 2016 was rebranded Miller Creative Group. –ODT

capturing-light-full-cover-proof2-1web-lifelogs-co-nz### ODT Online Mon, 31 Oct 2016
Colour and light
By Shane Gilchrist
Amid the various refractions of memory, as shards of one scene are overlaid on another, Brian Miller recalls a childhood image of a stained-glass kiln out the back of Dunedin signwriting firm Miller Studios. He also pictures his Uncle Roy holding pieces of glass up against the light before cutting curves with the confidence of a master. Thankfully, Roy Miller’s work is a tangible thing. New Zealand’s leading stained glass artist from the 1950s until his death in 1981, Miller produced more than 330 windows, in about 100 churches around New Zealand. Brian details Miller’s legacy in Capturing Light: Roy Miller – New Zealand Stained Glass Artist, which offers an insight not only into the life and work of his uncle but also provides a history of the art of stained glass, both in New Zealand and internationally, as well as an overview of early Dunedin stained-glass artists. In short, it’s a celebration of artistic inspiration and the artisan skills required to, as the title says, capture light. The book also contains plenty of information on techniques for conserving historic stained glass artworks, all of which provides an inherent warning: that many such works are in danger of degradation.
Read more

ODT: Looking at a stained glass window …

THE BOOK
Capturing Light: Roy Miller – New Zealand Stained Glass Artist
Published by Lifelogs Ltd ($69.99)
More information about Roy Miller and the history of stained glass:
Website https://roymiller.co.nz | Facebook Capturing Light

The publishers Brian and Diane Miller have an extensive background in bookselling, writing, publishing and photography. They operated Tapui Children’s Books for over twenty years before venturing into their own publishing business Lifelogs Ltd.

roy-m-brian-millers-albums-phanfare-com-merge1-by-whatifdunedinroy-miller-our-lady-of-peace-by-brian-miller-detail-framed-blk-10436323_669723813121105_4287719595656850255_nroy-miller-cross-by-brian-miller-tweaked-10492612_669275109832642_7397525572749572941_n

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

1 Comment

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, Design, Dunedin, Heritage, Housing, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Public interest, Tourism

WHO says ‘heritage rules are too restrictive’ —What’s their agenda in the Heritage City

FIRST, THE GOOD NEWS

St. Joseph's Cathedral and ConventSt Joseph’s and the Dominican Priory, Smith St [cardcow.com]

‘A new roof for Dunedin’s Dominican Priory, considered one of New Zealand’s most important and at-risk historic buildings, is a big step closer following a $100,000 grant. [The] Dunedin Heritage Fund had committed the money from its 2016-17 budget. The 139-year old priory was built to house the city’s Dominican nuns and provide teaching space for girls. Despite its vast scale and elaborate construction – its floating concrete staircase and double-glazed music room were cutting edge designs in their day – the building received little maintenance over its working life.’ –Gerald Scanlan, Catholic Diocese of Dunedin (ODT)

19.2.16 ODT: Boost for restoration of priory (+ video)
12.5.16 ODT: DCC commits $100,000 to priory restoration
27.6.16 ODT: Priory future gets clean slate

*The Dunedin Heritage Fund is administered by representatives of Dunedin City Council and Heritage New Zealand.

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MORE GOOD NEWS

dunedin-prison-castlecruiser-co-nzDunedin Prison “big-picture project” [dunedinprisontrust.co.nz]

‘The Dunedin Prison Trust has raised about $500,000 to start the first stage of its development programme to return the [old prison] building to its original appearance. […] Last year, the trust lodged a planning application with the Dunedin City Council detailing about $250,000 of restorative work which would return the prison’s exterior to its original 1896 condition. The application included work on the building’s roof and walls, as well as seismic strengthening, work expected to cost another $250,000.’ (ODT)

24.8.16 ODT: Restoration begins on historic prison
2.9.16 ODT: Captive audience for prison project
17.9.16 ODT: Old prison roof being restored

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GOOD NEWS CONTINUES

dunedin-courthouse-panoramio-com-1Dunedin Courthouse [panoramio.com]

‘Refurbishing and strengthening Dunedin’s historic courthouse is expected to cost more than $18 million, according to a building consent approved by the Dunedin City Council. The consent includes detailed designs that council building services manager Neil McLeod says involve some of the most extensive earthquake-strengthening ever undertaken in the city. The plans also show the extent to which the Ministry of Justice plans on returning the building to its former glory.’ (ODT)

10.9.16 ODT: $18m to be spent on court upgrade
29.9.16 ODT: Courthouse restoration set to begin
30.9.16 ODT: Dunedin firm wins courthouse contract

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BAD NEWS

physio-pool-dunedin-eventfinda-co-nz

‘The Physio Pool is one of the largest warm water swimming pools in New Zealand and Dunedin’s only therapeutic swimming pool. The temperature is always kept around 35 degrees. We feature wheelchair accessibility, hoist and private changing rooms. The benefits of warm water exercise are tremendous and have an extremely positive impact on the quality of life for all ages. We are open to the public and offer a non-threatening environment for swimming, aqua jogging, individual exercise programmes, or warm water relaxation.’ —physiopool.org.nz

### ODT Online Sat, 1 Oct 2016
Pool heritage status opposed
By Vaughan Elder
The Southern District Health Board is fighting a proposal to classify  Dunedin’s already endangered physio pool site as a heritage building, saying it may have to be demolished as part of a hospital redevelopment. This comes as the Property Council and the University of Otago are set to argue at next week’s  Second Generation Dunedin City District Plan (2GP) hearings that proposed rules aimed at protecting the city’s heritage buildings are too restrictive.
Read more

█ Heritage New Zealand | Otago Therapeutic Pool List No. 7581
Historical information and Heritage significance at http://www.heritage.org.nz/the-list/details?id=7581

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FURTHER BAD NEWS AND PILLOCKS

Criticism of the [second generation district] plan comes after praise in recent times for the council for its proactive approach towards saving the city’s heritage buildings.

### ODT Online Sun, 2 Oct 2016
Heritage rules deemed too restrictive
By Vaughan Elder
The Dunedin City Council’s proposed new heritage rules are too restrictive and property owners should have more freedom to demolish uneconomic heritage buildings, the Property Council says. This comes as Second Generation Dunedin City District Plan (2GP) commissioners are set to hear arguments next week about a new set of rules aimed at protecting the city’s heritage buildings. The University of Otago is also among submitters to have expressed concern about rules,  planner and policy adviser Murray Brass saying they had the potential to  reduce protection by making it more difficult to maintain and use heritage buildings.
A summary on the 2GP website said the changes included addressing the threat of “demolition by neglect” by making it easier to put old buildings to new uses and requiring resource consent for most changes to identified heritage buildings and “character-contributing” buildings within defined heritage precincts.
The new rules have prompted a strong response.
Read more

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FOR HISTORIC HERITAGE

the-fight

Second Generation District Plan (2GP) – Heritage
Read all Heritage topic documents including reports, evidence and submissions to date at: https://2gp.dunedin.govt.nz/2gp/hearings-schedule/heritage.html

Documents
Notice of Hearing
Agenda
Speaking Schedule – updated 29 September

Council Evidence
Section 42A report
Section 42A report addendum

DCC expert evidence
Statement of evidence of Glen Hazelton [Policy planner – heritage]

█ Download: s42a Heritage Report with appendices (PDF, 5 MB)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Election Year. This post is offered in the public interest.

carisbrook-turnstile-building-neville-st-hnz-cat-i-historic-place-filmcameraworkshopCarisbrook turnstile building, Neville St | HNZ Category 1 historic place
[filmcameraworkshop.com]

7 Comments

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SAVE Sammy’s (former His Majesty’s Theatre & Agricultural Hall)

Agricultural Hall. Burton Brothers studio. Te Papa Archives [C.012324]

His Majesty's Theatre, Dunedin [render via realestate.co.nz]His Majesty’s Theatre, Dunedin [render via realestate.co.nz]

Sammy's on Crawford [dunedinmusic.com]Sammy’s portico to Crawford Street [dunedinmusic.com]

REAL ESTATE BLURB | Built 1896 Agricultural Hall 1902 Renamed His Majesty’s Theatre 1983 Sammy’s Cabaret & Restaurant
Time for someone else to take over the reins – with fresh enthusiasm and ideas for this iconic Dunedin property. Located in the heart of Dunedin’s rapidly developing ‘Warehouse Precinct’ it lends itself to a multitude of uses. Building 1500m with frontages to both Crawford & Vogel Streets. http://www.remax.co.nz/10395003

█ SOUL DESTROYING LACK OF DISTRICT PLAN SCHEDULING
‘An offer pending consent for Sammy’s would more likely mean plans to considerably alter or demolish the building.’ –Glen Hazelton, DCC Policy Planner (Heritage)

█ SHINING LIGHTS
“It’s already protected under our Act, that’s the main thing.” –Matthew Schmidt, HNZ Otago Southland regional archaeologist

### ODT Online Wed, 18 Nov 2015
Uncertain future for venue
By Craig Borley
Demolition could be an option for Sammy’s, one of Dunedin’s most loved live music venues and one of the warehouse precinct’s largest buildings. On the market for “a few months” and with a list price of $240,000, the 1896 building had attracted attention from several potential buyers, owner Sam Chin said yesterday. Interest from one of those potential buyers was contingent on gaining a resource consent, Mr Chin said. He could not name the potential buyer and did not know what that resource consent was for.
Read more

BIG QUEST TO FIND THE RIGHT NEW OWNER – MEANWHILE, CITIZEN DUTY TO PROTECT THE BUILDING AS AN ICONIC PRESENCE IN VOGEL STREET HERITAGE PRECINCT AND WAREHOUSE PRECINCT

Sammy's Dunedin, NZ 7.9.12 [Sola Rosa via staticflickr.com]Sammy’s Dunedin NZ 7.9.12 [Sola Rosa via staticflickr.com]

Sammy's [alizarinlizard.blogspot.co.nz]Sammy’s (2011) [alizarinlizard.blogspot.co.nz]

“….we got back to Dunedin by lunchtime and unloaded the P.A gear into Sammys then went home an slept the rest of the day till we had to come back an sound check..
but yeah, played later on that night and had a blast. Sammys looks absolutely amazing now days if you havent seen it already.”
–Alizarin Lizard, Dunedin psych-pop quartet

But what looked good at night under lights in 2011 was profoundly “trouble” due to lack of diligent building repair and maintenance, or any appreciation for fire safety…. and more words from Mr Chin….

[via comments at What if? Dunedin]

Elizabeth
June 1, 2011 at 2:58 am
### D Scene 1-6-11
Future of Sammy’s uncertain after eviction (page 3)
The future of notable Dunedin music venue Sammy’s is uncertain, after the eviction earlier this week of the operators of the Crawford St business. Building owner Sam Chin told D Scene yesterday that he had moved into the venue on Monday night and changed the locks. “The venue is closed for now and we’re just cleaning things up.”
{continues} #bookmark [search required]

Elizabeth
June 2, 2011 at 8:40 pm
Tweet:
(2 June, 8:32pm) @DunedinTV Sammy’s closed down due to being in a complete state of disrepair http://tinyurl.com/43dprnf #channel9 #dunedin #tv #nz

Elizabeth
June 23, 2011 at 2:33 pm
### ODT Online Thu, 23 Jun 2011
Nightclub owner angry over damage at venue
By Nigel Benson
Sammy’s owner Sam Chin has experienced some wild nights at the nightclub over the years. But he was not prepared for the sight which greeted him when he changed the locks on the building three weeks ago, after not receiving rent from the lessee since November. […] The venue opened in 1896 as the Agricultural Hall, before being renamed His Majesty’s Theatre, and has a long history as a hall, theatre and live music venue. Mr Chin said he wanted to maintain that tradition and reopen it for concerts next month.
Read more

Elizabeth
August 7, 2011 at 11:36 am
### ODT Online Sun, 7 Aug 2011
Sammy’s set to reopen this month
By Nigel Benson
Sammy’s will reopen this month after being closed in June for refurbishment. Owner Sam Chin shut the venue after the building fell into disrepair. He said yesterday demand had led to him taking bookings again. […] “We had a lot of inquiries about when we were going to reopen. It’s such a good space with plenty of room for 500-plus people. We’ve already got three or four university graduation dinners booked in over the next couple of weeks.”
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

34 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Concerts, Construction, DCC, Democracy, Design, Dunedin, Economics, Heritage, Heritage NZ, Inspiration, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Tourism, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

Dunedin Heritage Fund: Latest funding round | recipient building projects

### ODT Online Tue, 20 Oct 2015
Heritage fund contributes to renaissance
By Craig Borley
Another collection of old Dunedin buildings is to get a council cash injection as the city continues its renaissance. The 10 buildings received a combined $113,500 at this month’s meeting of the Dunedin City Council’s heritage fund committee.
Read more + Images

The grants
• Kelsey Yaralla Kindergarten, Trent Ave, North Dunedin: $5000 (earthquake strengthening)
• Golden Leaf International, 16 Manse St: $10,000 (earthquake strengthening)
• Empire Hotel, 395 Princes St: $5500 (earthquake strengthening report, prior to facade restoration)
• Gresham Hotel, 42 Queens Gardens: $20,000 (exterior restoration)
• Former stables, 218 Crawford St – $20,000 (reuse)
• Stafford House, 2 Stafford St – $5000 (fire upgrade)
• Loan and Mercantile Building, 33 Thomas Burns St – $20,000 (facade cleaning and restoration)
• Married quarters, Quarantine Island: $3000 (strengthening)
• Glenfalloch: $5000 (conservation plan update)
• Carpet Court, 115 Cumberland St: $20,000 (reuse)

TOTAL: $113,500

Dunedin Heritage Fund graphic 1DUNEDIN HERITAGE FUND

The Dunedin City Council and the New Zealand Historic Places Trust (now Heritage New Zealand) jointly administer the Dunedin Heritage Fund to support the protection and conservation of Dunedin’s built heritage, as well as the continued use and appreciation of these places by the community.

The Heritage Fund Committee has the ability to make grants or loans to the owner or occupier of any historic place within Dunedin for the purpose of assisting that owner or occupier to manage, maintain or preserve that historic place.

The Dunedin Heritage Fund can provide incentive funding for a wide range of works. These include:

i. Essential repairs, stabilisation or core structural works.
ii. Restoration projects.
iii. Upgrades to code/regulation standards to enable contemporary use of heritage places, eg fire, earthquake, access provisions.
iv. Specific “like with like” material replacement/maintenance projects that protect the integrity of heritage buildings (eg slate or timber shingle roofing; copper gutters/downpipes; wooden joinery; stained glass; stonework; pressed tin ceilings; etc)
v. Preparation of heritage conservation plans.
vi. Emergency or protective works to protect heritage fabric.

Note: Routine maintenance will not normally be a high priority for assistance.

█ For more information and guidelines for how to apply, go to:
Dunedin Heritage Funding Application (DCC website)

Contacts:
Glen Hazelton, DCC Policy Planner (Heritage) 03 477 4000
Jonathan Howard, HNZ Otago Southland Area Manager 03 477 9871

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Vogel Street Party —Sat, 10 October

Vogel St Party banner
Admission: FREE

The inaugural Vogel Street Party was held last year in conjunction with the first ever Dunedin Street Art Festival; this year’s event will again be staged in the warehouse precinct and will collaborate with the Dunedin UNESCO City of Literature group for a party themed around Literature and Light.

LITERATURE To celebrate Dunedin’s creative city status as a UNESCO City of Literature Dunedin, New Zealand. You can find us sitting alongside only 10 other cities in the world that hold this status, including Edinburgh, Melbourne, Dublin, Prague & more.

LIGHT As 2015 is the International Year of Light, the VSP will be Dunedin’s major effort to join in the world-wide celebration of light and light based technologies.

Vogel Street Party image 685083-320448-34 1

The events, exhibitions and activities will follow these themes and showcase the talent and creativity we have hidden in our city.

The Vogel Street Party 2015 — fun attractions for people of all ages.
PARTY STARTS 10 October at 3pm.
Note start times vary for Open Hours at Heritage Buildings.

█ Webpage: http://vogelstparty.nz/

█ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/1611938749075531/

█ Download: Vogel Street Party PROGRAMME

OPEN Buildings [excerpt from programme – click to enlarge]

Vogel Street Party 2015 open buildings

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, Design, Dunedin, Events, Fun, Heritage, Innovation, Inspiration, New Zealand, People, Property, Site, Tourism, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

Dunedin Prison: Community Trust grant for restoration

39 Dunedin Television Published on Sep 17, 2015
Historic prison restoration gets kickstart

● Resource consent granted for conservation and repair
● Funding from Otago Community Trust
● New visitor centre
● Prison tours
● Restaurant for courtyard

### dunedintv.co.nz Thu, 17 Sep 2015
Historic prison restoration gets kickstart
A $90,000 grant is kickstarting the project to restore Dunedin’s historic prison to its former glory. The money will enable the Dunedin Prison Charitable Trust to start exterior repairs. And that means members are finally able to turn their vision into reality.
Ch39 Link

[click to enlarge]DCC Webmap - 2 Castle Street (former) Dunedin PrisonDCC Webmap – 2 Castle Street, former Dunedin Prison [Jan/Feb 2013]

Dunedin Prison Charitable Trust

Related Posts and Comments:
16.9.15 DPAG exhibition talk, Sun 20 Sep —Jonathan Howard on Dunedin 1865
7.9.15 Public petition to save Courthouse for courts use
30.8.15 DPAG exhibition | Dunedin 1865: A City Rises…
23.8.15 1865 Dunedin —Heritage Festival 2015 ‘The Open City’ … 29 Aug
23.8.15 1865 Dunedin —Heritage Festival 2015 Shoreline Trail launch
11.7.15 Dunedin Law Courts “an incredible historic building” –Minister
14.5.15 Russell Lund on Ministry closure of Dunedin Law Courts
14.5.15 Justice at Dunedin
2.5.15 Ministry serves INJUSTICE for Dunedin Courthouse #HistoricHeritage
28.2.13 Tour the old prison in March (2013)
20.9.12 Dunedin Prison
6.6.12 Dunedin Prison purchased by trust
18.10.11 Dunedin Prison Charitable Trust

█ For more, enter the term *heritage* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

12 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, Design, Economics, Heritage, Heritage NZ, Inspiration, Media, Name, New Zealand, NZHPT, People, Project management, Property, Site, Structural engineering, Tourism, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

Standard Building, 201 Princes Street —then and today

Standard Fire and Marine Insurance Company of New Zealand Building (1875)
Architect: Mason and Wales

Standard Building IMG_20150829_130631 (7)standard-building-img_20150829_130847-3

Standard Building IMG_20150829_130847 (1b)Standard Buildiing IMG_20150829_130418 (7a)

█ Ideas: https://www.pinterest.com/throughjo/staircasing/

### ODT Online Sat, 29 Aug 2015
Surprises in old buildings
By Craig Borley
The doors to some of Dunedin’s historic buildings will be opened to the public today as the city’s heritage festival continues. The Dunedin Heritage Festival began yesterday with the “Dunedin 1865: A City Rises” photographic exhibition in the Dunedin Public Art Gallery. The festival finishes tomorrow. A major draw is the tours today and tomorrow of 64 historic buildings, which will be raising their customary barriers to the public […] the festival would also include a children’s heritage trail at Toitu Otago Settlers Museum, a walking trail following Dunedin’s original shoreline and a special service in First Church.
Read more

### ODT Online Tue, 2 Jun 2015
‘Absolutely incredible’ revamp of heritage building
By John Gibb
An “absolutely incredible” conservation and adaptive reuse project is nearing completion in Dunedin. This work on the Standard Building in Princes St, including extensive earthquake strengthening [and restoration of the Italian-style facade] has been undertaken as momentum grows to further revitalise the Exchange area, and a wave of adaptive reuse work continues to transform the nearby warehouse precinct. […] The project also includes the Stanton Building, situated behind the Standard Building, and backing on to the council’s Dowling St car park. A crucial – and previously largely hidden – feature of the redevelopment is an innovative, light-filled multilevel internal atrium, making extensive use of glass, which will link the two buildings and provide access to the various floors.
Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
23.8.15 1865 Dunedin —Heritage Festival 2015 ‘The Open City’ Sat 29 August
23.8.15 1865 Dunedin —Heritage Festival 2015 Shoreline Trail launch
17.3.12 Call for photographs or building plans – Standard Building….
24.10.11 Former Standard Insurance building, 201 Princes St, Dunedin

Post and 4 smartphone images by Elizabeth Kerr

1 Comment

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DCC: $6.2M propagation house —Dunedin Botanic Garden

Propagation House at Dunedin Botanic Garden via Ch39

Otago Daily Times Published on Aug 6, 2015
Praise for garden’s ‘striking’ new facility
The biggest investment in the Dunedin Botanic Garden’s history can simulate arid deserts, tropical forests and sub-antarctic islands on the slopes of Signal Hill.

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Botanic Garden’s New Propagation House Opened

This item was published on 06 Aug 2015

The Dunedin Botanic Garden’s new propagation house is a wonderful addition to the Garden’s celebrated features, Mayor of Dunedin Dave Cull says.

“In many ways the propagation and nursery facilities are the engine room of the Garden. This modern facility provides excellent conditions for plants as they are nurtured before going on public display around the Garden. This impressive new building helps us reinforce our reputation as a Garden of International Significance,” Mr Cull says.

The new propagation house was officially opened this afternoon at a civic opening with invited guests. An open day, at a date to be advised, will be held in spring so members of the public can tour the new facility. The new facility, on Lovelock Avenue, replaces the old and dilapidated glasshouses and plant nursery near the aviary. Work on the $6.2 million project began in October 2013 and the completed building was handed over in May this year.

Botanic Garden (Curator) Team Leader Alan Matchett says the new propagation facility provides the space and technology for the Garden to produce a more extensive range of plants from succulents and cacti, to alpines, tropical, subtropical, and ferns and orchids. The need for an updated facility had been apparent for some years as the former glasshouses, built in the early 1900s, began to deteriorate and the environmental management systems became less energy efficient and inadequate to produce the variety of plants needed by the Garden. The new facility provides about 600sq m of indoor space and has been designed to make the most of natural elements, such as the sun. Environmental conditions in the seven glasshouses can be controlled centrally to suit the different varieties of plants growing in each area. Watering and humidity levels are now computer controlled. The glasshouses can hold more than 12,000 plants, excluding seedlings.

As well as providing plant nursery facilities, the new building provides a base for education activities for school groups, public workshops and demonstrations. It also provides room for the Garden’s long-time supporters, the Friends of the Garden, to work. The new propagation house is the first part of a larger vision for that area of the Garden, which includes establishing a café, and visitors’ centre. Moving the nursery and glasshouses means the site they currently occupy in the upper garden can be developed to achieve its potential as a prime landscape feature.

Contact Dunedin Botanic Garden (Curator) Team Leader on 03 477 4000.
DCC Link

█ 21.1.15 ODT: Propagation unit preview [photographs]

● Culmination of 19-year journey, nursery replaces 90-year facility

### ODT Online Sat, 8 Aug 2015
Praise for garden’s ‘striking’ new facility
By Craig Borley
The biggest investment in the Dunedin Botanic Garden’s history can simulate arid deserts, tropical forests and sub-antarctic islands on the slopes of Signal Hill. The garden’s new propagation and nursery facility was completed in May but officially opened on Thursday, showcasing its seven separate growing environments – alpine, arid succulent, temperate, arid cacti, subtropical, tropical, and propagation.
Read more

● New nursery designed with school groups in mind

### ODT Online Sat, 8 Aug 2015
Maintaining a living museum
By Craig Borley
There are public parks and public gardens with great collections of plants, but they are not botanic gardens, Dunedin Botanic Garden propagation services officer Alice Lloyd-Fitt said yesterday. Explaining why the garden needed a nursery and propagation facility, she said a botanic garden’s point of difference was its role as a living museum. Education, conservation and plant collection roles all mattered, and those roles could not be filled without a functional nursery.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: (top) 39 Dunedin Television – Propagation House [screenshot]

7 Comments

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Captain Cook Hotel adaptive re-use

Cook Hotel 1 [Google Street View Nov 2012]354 Great King Street [Google Street View Nov 2012]

### ODT Online on Wed, 5 Aug 2015
Bringing ‘The Cook’ back to life
By Damian George
Patrons will be able to toast the reopening of Dunedin’s historic Captain Cook Tavern by Christmas, the project’s architect says. The venue, a popular jaunt for Dunedin’s student population, was founded in 1860 but closed in June last year. […] Architect Ed Elliott, of Queenstown company Elliott Architects Ltd, said a large emphasis of the refurbishment was placed on preserving the building’s character when design plans were drawn up.
Read more

█ The Cook Hotel is now at 70% seismic strengthening.

Otago Daily Times Published on Aug 4, 2015
Bringing ‘The Cook’ back to life
Patrons will be able to toast the reopening of Dunedin’s historic Captain Cook Tavern by Christmas, the project’s architect says.

Michael Brown established the hotel in 1864. The original “Cook”, a wooden structure, was pulled down in 1873 to make way for a brick and stone building which stands today. The replacement was designed by architect David Ross (1828-1908).

Cook Hotel - Otago Witness 29.11.1873 p19 News of the Week [Papers Past]Otago Witness 29.11.1873 Issue 1148 (page 19)

### otago.ac.nz Otago Magazine Issue 40
Whatever happened to…
The Cook?

There would be few Otago alumni who don’t have some sort of story about The Cook.
Built in the 1870s, The Captain Cook Hotel (to use its full name) has been part of North Dunedin as long as the University of Otago itself, becoming woven into the backdrop of student life.
When word of its imminent closure started circulating in 2013 it is fair to say there was widespread dismay at the loss of what was seen as a Dunedin institution. On the day it closed its doors, in June 2013, people who had not set foot in the pub since they were students made sure they went in to toast The Cook and to share their stories and memories.
Since then the two-storey brick building has been wrapped in a scaffolding cocoon while a transformation takes place. The owners – Chris James, Noel Kennedy and Greg Paterson – are having the building taken back to its original look, right down to the old traditional corner entrance to the downstairs front bar.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Warehouse conversions | Apartment interiors #materials #light #colour

Loft-Barcelona-01 [homedsgn.com]

Warehouse Converted to Modern Loft
This 8,600 square-foot loft was completed and renovated by developers and designers of urban lofts Benito Escat and Alberto Rovira; the designers teamed up with interior design studio Minim for this ambitious project. What was once stables (built in 1930), a bomb shelter and then a print shop is now a modern loft located in Barcelona, Spain. The original brick walls are exposed, and the high concrete ceilings make the space truly magnificent. Glass lights set in the floor reveal the bearing structure and provide light to the level below.

More photos at http://www.iintrepidinc.com/lifeinstyle/2011/9/29/a-rustic-modern-loft-warehouse-conversion-barcelona.html

Russian architect Denis Krasikovis created this eclectic apartment in Murmansk, Russia.

001-murmansk-apartment-denis-krasikov [homeadore.com]004-murmansk-apartment-denis-krasikov [homeadore.com]008-murmansk-apartment-denis-krasikov [homeadore.com]002-murmansk-apartment-denis-krasikov [designyoutrust.com]011-murmansk-apartment-denis-krasikov [homeadore.com]

More photos at http://www.homeadore.com/2014/12/09/murmansk-apartment-denis-krasikov/

In 2014, Vertebrae Architecture designed this tiny 330 square feet apartment in Venice, California. Full height hidden storage delineates space and provides visual and acoustic privacy. The minimal material palette minimizes distraction and maximizes the spatial quality of the apartment.

001-micro-apartment-vertebrae-architecture [homeadore.com]004-micro-apartment-vertebrae-architecture [designyoutrust.com]006-micro-apartment-vertebrae-architecture [homeadore.com]007-micro-apartment-vertebrae-architecture [designyoutrust.com]

More images at http://www.homeadore.com/2014/12/08/micro-apartment-vertebrae-architecture/

Rad Design fully demolished and redesigned the interior of this loft in Toronto, Canada. Custom shelving and displays show off the client’s antique camera collection and books on photography. The client had requested use of reclaimed wood materials and simple, metal elements. A small black platform makes the low bed float slightly above the floor. The bright new kitchen and bathroom add modern touches.

001-photo-loft-rad-design [homeadore.com]004-photo-loft-rad-design [homeadore.com]003-photo-loft-rad-design [homeadore.com]006-photo-loft-rad-design [homeadore.com]005-photo-loft-rad-design [homeadore.com]008-photo-loft-rad-design [homeadore.com]009-photo-loft-rad-design [homeadore.com] 1

More images at http://www.homeadore.com/2014/11/04/photo-loft-rad-design/

Warehouse in San Francisco Converted into Contemporary Loft
This project located in the historic Oriental Warehouse Loft Building in San Francisco’s South Beach neighbourhood, is a complete reconfiguration and renovation of an existing loft apartment. In order to maximize the spatial experience of the loft, traditional notions of domestic privacy were abandoned in favour of open and transparent relationships. Here is more on the renovation process from the architects: “Opaque guardrails at the sleeping mezzanine were replaced with frameless glass guardrails in order to provide a direct visual connection to the living room below. A large over-sized sheet of transparent glass further eliminates privacy in the master bathroom by allowing views into and out of the bathroom to the rest of the loft beyond. In contrast to the existing heavy-timber and rusticated brick structural shell which are left exposed, sleek new interior finishes were replaced throughout including wall and floor finishes, kitchen and bathroom mill work and a new steel cantilever stair that connects the living areas on the ground floor with the sleeping areas on the mezzanine.”

Oriental Warehouse Loft exterior [freshome.com]Oriental Warehouse Loft 2a Edmonds + Lee Architects [edmondslee.com]Oriental Warehouse Loft 4a Edmonds + Lee Architects [edmondslee.com]Oriental Warehouse Loft 6a Edmonds + Lee Architects [edmondslee.com]Oriental Warehouse Loft 8a Edmonds + Lee Architects [edmondslee.com]Oriental Warehouse Loft 13a Edmonds + Lee Architects [edmondslee.com]Oriental Warehouse Loft 7a Edmonds + Lee Architects [edmondslee.com]Oriental Warehouse Loft 11a Edmonds + Lee Architects [edmondslee.com]Oriental Warehouse Loft 3a Edmonds + Lee Architects [edmondslee.com]Oriental Warehouse Loft 9a Edmonds + Lee Architects [edmondslee.com]

Edmonds + Lee Architects: http://www.edmondslee.com/owl.html

Jestico & Whiles, Andel’s Hotel Łódź, Poland, warehouse conversion (completed 2009)
Located in central Łódź, the hotel features a top-floor spa centre and modern interior design. Its spacious and bright rooms come with air conditioning and a flat-screen TV. The hotel houses a luxury spa, the skySPAce, featuring a glass-covered swimming pool with beautiful city views, as well as various saunas, a massage parlour and a fitness centre. The hotel is a beautiful building with a post-industrial character. You can see an old and historical place (loads of old factory elements) and on the other hand the building is really modern. The Andel’s Hotel Łódź is housed in the cultural and commercial complex of Manufaktura, just 1.5 km from the famous Piotrkowska Street. The hotel was recently awarded the best in Poland in a European ranking.

Andel's Hotel, Lodz, Poland 6 exterior [booking.com]Andels Hotel, Lodz, Poland 1 facade with pool room [op-architekten.com]Andels Hotel, Lodz, Poland 1 pool [holidaycheck.com]Andels Hotel, Lodz, Poland 1 pool [tripadvisor.com]Andels Hotel, Lodz, Poland 2 lobby area [vi-hotels.com]JAW-AHL-0003Andels Hotel, Lodz, Poland top light [wikimedia.org]Andels Hotel, Lodz, Poland 3 lobby area [thecoolhunter.net]Andel's Hotel, Lodz, Poland 1 dining [e-architect.co.uk]Andels Hotel, Lodz, Poland 2 restaurant [tripadvisor.com]Andels Hotel, Lodz, Poland standard suite [vi-hotels.com]Andels Hotel, Lodz, Poland meeting room [urlowpolsce.pl]

More photos and their sources via Google Images

Lant Street warehouse conversion, Southwark, London
Dow Jones Architects
An ongoing process of urban regeneration has seen the transformation of nineteenth century light industrial buildings into residential quarters for the liberal middle classes. In Lant Street, a five-level former brick warehouse is a case in point; over the past few years it has been gradually transformed into residential property with an art gallery below street level. Dow Jones Architects was asked to convert the top two floors and the roof, with spectacular views of the city, into a separate apartment. The brief was unequivocal; the client asked for ‘London in my living room’.
Giving views of the City skyline, only previously available from the rooftop, required the placement of the living room on the uppermost floor, with the sleeping and bathroom area on lowest level and the kitchen and dining in the middle. Preserving the stairways in their original locations allowed a relatively unpartitioned organisation of the individual floors, with just two oversized, automatically operated fire doors unobtrusively concealed in wall linings. Dow Jones’ internal material palette combines the original brick surfaces and rough timber structure with new smooth oak linings with flush camouflaged doors. The in-situ concrete boxes that mark the wet areas – bathroom, shower room, kitchen – read as discrete objects placed atop the existing surfaces.

DowJonesArchitects Lant Street warehouse conversion, Southwark, London [architecturetoday.co.uk]

Read more at http://www.architecturetoday.co.uk/?p=6122

Historically Preserved Mansion Gets Eclectic Makeover
A true mansion, originally from 1922, with preserved architecture and full of details that reveal a rare magnificence, is the headquarters of the 22nd Edition of Casa Cor Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. With very high ceilings and large windows, the beautiful and famous building has been designed in an eclectic style with over 5,400 square metres of constructed area, divided into 52 environments, with about 80 professionals who have demonstrated that it is possible to renew with style, but without deleting the marks of time. The building was once a Boarding School of Nursing Anna Nery (1926- 1973) and the College Student House (1973-1995). Here, past, present and future coexist im harmony.

Casa-Cor-13-1-Kindesign [onekindesign.com]

Casa-Cor-34-1-Kindesign [onekindesign.com]

Interactive room. Reuse was the watchword for Tiana Meggiolaro and Bia Lynch who set up the room with brick walls left exposed. “Based on the concept of upcycling and demos new function was given to the pallets, wooden structures used in freight transport that became bookshelf and countertop,” says Tiana.Casa-Cor-54-1-Kindesign [onekindesign.com]

Jewellery. The space of interior designers Mariana Dean, Jason Sartori and Luciana Arnaud pays homage to the fashion designer Coco Chanel and makes reference to her jewellery.
Casa-Cor-45-1-Kindesign [onekindesign.com]

More at http://www.onekindesign.com/tag/preservation/page/5/

Related Posts and Comments:
1.1.15 Dezeen: 3 projects #materials
28.12.14 Small apartments —then !! New York by Gehry #2011nuclear
25.12.14 2Modern Blog | Modern Decor + Architecture + Interiors
19.10.14 Dunedin: Randoms from inside warehouse precinct 18.10.14
22.6.14 Vogel Street Heritage Precinct (TH13)
17.4.11 Ricardo Bofill’s cement factory
28.12.10 Urban Outfitters Corporate Campus / Meyer, Scheter & Rockcastle

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Significant Tree: 23 Church St, Mosgiel

The applicant (LUC-2014-579) wanting to remove a Significant Tree is none other than Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board member Martin Dillon.

His profile at the DCC website:
Martin Dillon profile, Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board 1

Significant Tree – 23 Church Street, Mosgiel – LUC-2014-579

Closes: 16/01/2015

Notification of Application for a Resource Consent – Under Section 93(2) of the Resource Management Act 1991.

The Dunedin City Council has received the following application for Resource Consent:

Application description
To remove a tree that is listed in the Dunedin City District Plan under Schedule 25.5 as T068 (English elm).

Related documents
LUC-2014-579 Public Notice (PDF, 33.8 KB)
This document is the Public Notice for Resource Consent application LUC-2014-579

LUC-2014-579 Submission form (PDF, 92.4 KB)
This document can be used to make a submission regarding Resource Consent application LUC-2014-579

LUC-2014-579 Application (PDF, 1.8 MB)
This document is a scanned copy of the application for resource consent LUC-2014-579

Notified resource consent details

Closing date
16/01/2015

Consent number
Significant tree – 23 Church Street, Mosgiel – LUC-2014-579

Name of applicant
M L & M C Dillon [Martin Dillon]

Location of site
23 Church Street, Mosgiel, being that land legally described as Lot 1 Deposited Plan 9558, held in Computer Freehold Register OT412/28

Address for service
M L & M C Dillon, 23 Church Street, Mosgiel 9024.

Online submission form

Making a submission

IMPORTANT: If you wish to make a submission on this application you may do so by sending a written submission to the consent authority, Dunedin City Council at PO Box 5045, Moray Place, Dunedin, 9058 Attn: City Planning, no later than 5:00 pm on the closing date shown.

The submission must be dated, signed by you, and include the following information:
1. Your name and postal address and phone number/fax number;
2. Details of the application in respect of which you are making the submission including location;
3. Whether you support, oppose, or are neutral towards the application;
4. Your submission, with reasons;
5. The decision you wish the consent authority to make;
6. Whether you wish to be heard in support of your submission.

Please note: If you make your submission by electronic means, a signature is not required.
An acknowledgment of your submission will be sent by post when the submission is accepted as complete. The application may be viewed at the City Planning Enquiries Desk, Customer Service Centre on the Ground Floor, Civic Centre, 50 The Octagon.
A copy of your submission must also be served as soon as reasonably practicable on the applicant at the address for service detailed on the public notices, available above.

DCC Link

DCC on Significant Trees

Dunedin City District Plan — Schedule 25.3 Significant Trees (PDF, 275.6 KB)

Related Post and Comments:
15.5.14 Significant Tree: 28A Heriot Row
22.2.13 DCC: Significant Trees

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

13 Comments

Filed under DCC, Democracy, Heritage, Name, New Zealand, People, Politics, Property, Town planning, Urban design

John Wickliffe House, 265 Princes Street LUC-2014-203 | Decision

Received by mail this morning, the Decision for the resource consent application (LUC-2014-203) to paint John Wickliffe House in The Exchange.

Phil Page (legal counsel) represented the applicant, Nick Baker of Baker Garden Architects, consulting architect and agent for the Plaza Property Trust.

Declined.

Decision
The final consideration of the application, which took into account all information presented at the Hearing, was held during the public-excluded portion of the Hearing. The Committee reached the following decision after considering the application under the statutory framework of the Resource Management Act 1991. In addition, a site visit was undertaken during the public-excluded portion of the Hearing. The Committee inspected the site and some other buildings referred to during the hearing and this added physical reality to the Committee’s considerations.

That, pursuant to Sections 34A and 104C and after having regard to Part II matters and Section 104 of the Resource Management Act 1991, The Dunedin City Council declines consent to the restricted discretionary activity to paint John Wickliffe House on the site at 265 Princes Street, Dunedin, being that land legally described as Section 6 Block XLIV Town of Dunedin held in Computer Freehold Register OT 18A/1024.

Right of Appeal — In accordance with Section 120 of the Resource Management Act 1991, the applicant and/or any submitter may appeal to the Environment Court against the whole or any part of this decision within 15 working days of the notice of this decision being received.

█ Download: John Wickliffe House LUC-2014-203 Decision 12 11 14

John Wickliffe House - Baker Garden Architects _1JW House exisiting [deltapsych.co.nz]

Acknowledgements

Related Post and Comments:
17.7.14 John Wickliffe House – application to paint exterior

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images: Baker Garden Architects – proposed paint scheme; deltapsych.co.nz – John Wickliffe House, existing surfaces

34 Comments

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Vogel St. Street Party | Saturday 18 Oct 3pm – 11pm [2014]

Updated post 7.11.14 at 6:18 p.m.

What change, collaboration and vision can do!

Vogel St_Street Party Sat 18 Oct 3pm-11pm[click to enlarge]

████ Download Map Guide for activity locations and booking information at http://vogelandbond.org/assets/VogelStreetPartyGuide.pdf

Building Tours - Vogel St Street Party

Related Posts and Comments:
█ 19.10.14 Dunedin: Randoms from inside warehouse precinct 18.10.14 [photos]
█ 22.6.14 Vogel Street Heritage Precinct (TH13) [photos]
5.8.14 DCC staff-led CBD projects that impact ratepayers | ….council debt
28.9.14 “DCC entitlement” about to ramrod change at CBD #manipulation

Photos by Glen Hazelton (Tumblr)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

11 Comments

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Vandervis family residence #HistoricHeritage

Lee Vandervis [leevandervis.wordpress.com] BWOn Dunedin TV tonight, newspaper editor Murray Kirkness mentioned the upcoming feature on Lee Vandervis’s beautiful historic home in Roslyn, written by Kim Dungey.

Read the weekend Mix at Otago Daily Times.

Vandervis residence BW [google street view] 1.1

Updated post 6.10.14 at 3.20 p.m.

### ODT Online Mon, 6 Oct 2014
Home & Garden
Labour of love
By Kim Dungey
Home ownership is not usually about daring physical feats but nobody’s told outspoken city councillor Lee Vandervis. Lee Vandervis was 15m above ground, spreadeagled over the peak of his roof. Moments earlier, he’d climbed out of the house on to the slate tiles and crawled along the ridging to repair and rewire a floodlight. The operation he admits was a “bit dodgy” was also typical of the boots-and-all approach Vandervis has taken to the restoration of his Roslyn home, built in the late 1890s for Otago Medical School dean John Halliday Scott.
Read more + Photos by Stephen Jaquiery

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: Vandervis residence via Google Street View (tweaked by whatifdunedin)

3 Comments

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Bell Tea Building has a future!

IMG_7215 (2)
IMG_6783 (3)
IMG_7214 (4)
IMG_7213 (2)

Bell Tea Company – New Zealand’s No. 1 Tea Company http://www.belltea.co.nz/

IMG_6775 (2a)The factory of New Zealand’s oldest tea company, founded in 1898 by Norman Harper Bell in Dunedin.

Dunedin’s Bell Tea building, on the corner of Hope and Carroll Sts, has been sold. Bayleys commercial, industrial and retail agent Robin Hyndman said there had been “good interest” in the building, more than 20 site visits and four tender offers lodged. (ODT)

### ODT Online Thu, 4 Sep 2014
Developer buys Bell Tea building
By Simon Hartley
Dunedin’s distinctive 90-year-old Bell Tea building has been sold to Dunedin developer Peter Gullen, who says it was a spur-of-the-moment purchase. Mr Gullen, known for building flats and townhouses around the city, was reluctant to go into plans for the building, but said he first “wanted to get it earthquake proof and save the building”.
Read more

ODT 3.7.14 Bell Tea building offered for sale
ODT 11.3.14 Bell Tea to close Dunedin factoryIMG_6789 (3)

Post and images by Elizabeth Kerr

5 Comments

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John Wickliffe House – application to paint exterior

Updated post 25.12.14

John Wickliffe House - Baker Garden Architects _1LUC-2014-203 Repair and exterior painting 265 Princes Street
Closes: 18/07/2014

Notification of Application for a Resource Consent – Under Section 93(2) of the Resource Management Act 1991.

The Dunedin City Council has received the following application:
Resource consent is sought for a restricted discretionary activity, being the repair and exterior painting of the John Wickliffe House at 265 Princes Street within the North Princes Street/Moray Place/Exchange Townscape Precinct (TH03). The paint will cover the existing precast concrete, the soffit and vertical concrete fins and the steel window frames.

An assessment of effects is provided with the application.

LUC-2014-203 DCC Planner’s Report (PDF, 4.78 MB)

John Wickliffe House proposed paint colours (1)

John Wickliffe House - 'Assessment of effects' Baker Garden Architects [click to enlarge]

John Wickliffe House [primecommercial.co.nz] 1

Related Post and Comments:
13.11.14 John Wickliffe House, 265 Princes Street LUC-2014-203 | Decision

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images: Baker Garden Architects (via DCC) – extracts from Application; primecommercial.co.nz – John Wickliffe House

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Vogel Street Heritage Precinct (TH13)

DCC Map Warehouse PrecinctStreet improvements under way for the redeveloped warehouses and other commercial buildings in the heritage precinct, including new light stands, plantings and protrusions — photographed last Saturday (14.6.14). Highly coloured seats and rubbish bins have yet to be installed. Read more about the project here.
Click map to enlarge.

Bike stands and a light stand outside Queens Gardens House, cnr Rattray Street:
IMG_4740 (1a)IMG_4735 (1a)IMG_4772 (1a)IMG_4964 (1a)

Light stand outside Phoenix House (45 Queens Gardens):
IMG_4752 (1a)

Looking south from Phoenix House along the west side of Vogel Street:
IMG_4736 (1a)

Looking north from Phoenix House to Queens Gardens:
IMG_4927 (1a)IMG_4947 (1a)

Former NMA buildings (note badly scaled and positioned sign):
IMG_4917 (1a)IMG_4899 (1a)IMG_4883 (1a)

Landscaping and protrusions for safe crossing:
IMG_4914 (1a)IMG_4910 (1a)IMG_4786 (1a)IMG_4832 (1a)IMG_4829 (1a)

Other views (including the former Donald Reid Store at 77 Vogel Street):
IMG_4809 (1a)IMG_4871 (1a)IMG_4803 (1a)IMG_4798 (1a)IMG_4835 (1a)

Warehouse Precinct Revitalisation Plan (PDF, 3.6 MB)
This Plan seeks to support the revitalisation to ensure the important historic Warehouse Precinct area becomes a vibrant and successful part of the central city, once again.

Dunedin Warehouse Precinct by Alexander Trapeznik, 2014, 188 pages with map and illustrations (PDF, 9.91MB)

Dunedin’s warehouse district is a newly rediscovered treasure. Spanning the few blocks stretching from the harbour-side to Princes Street, from Queens Gardens to the Oval, for many years this area slipped out of the public eye. The grid-pattern street layout contains a dense mixture of commercial and industrial buildings, typically between two and four storeys high. Many have a decorative façade to the street and plain brick or masonry walls facing their neighbours. Some became derelict, others home to a variety of uses. A few have been demolished to create car parks. Recently, many of the buildings have become the subject of renewed enthusiasm, being strengthened, refurbished, repainted and valued once again. –Trapeznik

Post and images by Elizabeth Kerr

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Significant Tree: 28A Heriot Row

Proposed for Removal: Significant Tree T578

Submissions Close: 30/05/2014

Notification of Application for a Resource Consent – Under Section 93(2) of the Resource Management Act 1991.

The Dunedin City Council has received the following application for Resource Consent:

Application description
Resource consent is sought to remove a significant tree at 28A Heriot Row, Dunedin. The tree is a Maple Tree (genus Acer) and is recorded as T578 in Schedule 25.3 of the Dunedin City District Plan. The tree is located in the front yard of the subject site.

The site is legally described as Part Section 30 Block XXIV Town of Dunedin, held in Computer Freehold Register OT96/150, and has an approximate area of 463m2. The site is located within the Royal Terrace/Pitt Street/Heriot Row Heritage Precinct (TH08).

Applicant: John and Evellen Jackson of Drysdale Ltd – 142 Stafford Drive, Ruby Bay, Mapua 7005

Read more:
http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/council-online/notified-resource-consents/current-consultation/significant-tree-28a-heriot-row

Quick Find: Application LUC-2014-157 (PDF, 882.3 KB)

28A Heriot Row (subject site) 1Light green circle indicates trunk position of Maple tree at 28A
28A Heriot Row (concept building sketch) 1Sketch concept for site development supplied by applicant

26, 28, 28A Heriot Row (showing Maple tree) DCC WebmapDCC Webmap showing proximity of Ritchie House, 26 Heriot Row

The applicant only seeks removal of the listed tree; a second resource consent application would be required to develop the subject site, since it is located in the heritage precinct.

SUBDIVISION HELL AT HERIOT ROW
The subject site is part of the former garden allotment, with original brick garage, of the Heritage New Zealand listed Category 1 Historic Place, the Ritchie House at 26 Heriot Row. This large, outstanding Arts and Crafts house and the brick garage were designed by renowned Dunedin architect Basil Hooper.

The applicant bought the property knowing the Significant Tree (Maple) was listed for protection in the district plan. The tree does not preclude development of the site; and note there is a covenant in place.

Independent consulting advice from an arborist, a landscape architect, and a design architect, to the Hearing Committee should be mandatory for consideration of the application. An opinion should also be sought from Heritage New Zealand (heritage precinct).

Heritage New Zealand registration information for 26 Heriot Row – go to Assessment criteria at http://www.heritage.org.nz/the-register/details/7492

Dunedin Heritage Fund
(administered by Heritage New Zealand and the Dunedin City Council)
2004. The owners of Ritchie House received a $20,000 loan to assist with a range of restoration works.

26 Heriot Row (watercolour sketch) 1Seen from 28 Heriot Row – 28A garden with Maple tree, and 26 Ritchie House

Related Post and Comments:
22.2.13 DCC: Significant Trees

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Heritage New Zealand

The New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT) – and now trading as Heritage New Zealand – is New Zealand’s leading national historic heritage agency and guardian of Aotearoa New Zealand’s national heritage. The environment in which NZHPT operates continues to be characterised by a growing interest in heritage, recognition of its social, cultural, environmental and economic benefits, and awareness of its importance to national identity.

The NZHPT was established by an Act of Parliament in 1954. The NZHPT is established as an autonomous Crown Entity under the Crown Entities Act 2004, and is supported by the Government and funded via Vote Arts, Culture and Heritage through the Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Its work, powers and functions are prescribed by the Historic Places Act 1993.

Heritage New Zealand – a change of name
In 2010, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage led a review of the Historic Places Act 1993 (HPA) and as a result of that work the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Bill was drafted and is currently before the House. It is currently awaiting the committee stage, and its third reading. The Bill includes provisions that will result in some changes to how the NZHPT operates, and to archaeological provisions of the HPA. It also proposes a change in name to Heritage New Zealand. The Bill will complete NZHPT’s transition from NGO to Crown Entity. To facilitate the transition, the decision was made to proceed with the name change ahead of the legislation. From 14 April 2014, the organisation has been known as Heritage New Zealand.

HeritageNewZealand 13 Apr 2014

Welcome to Heritage New Zealand
The New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT) has changed its name to Heritage New Zealand. Chief Executive Bruce Chapman explains the reasons behind the change.

Heritage New Zealand will continue to work in partnership with others, including iwi and hapū Māori, local and central government agencies, heritage NGOs, property owners, and volunteers. We will continue to provide advice to both central and local government, and property owners on the conservation of New Zealand’s most significant heritage sites. We will continue to maintain the national Register of historic places, manage 48 nationally significant heritage properties, regulate the modification of archaeological sites, and manage the national heritage preservation incentive fund.

While Heritage New Zealand receives 80% of its funding from the Crown, like many other Crown agencies it continues to be dependent for the remainder of funding from supporters, donations, grants, bequests, and through revenue generated at the heritage properties it cares for around the country.

Three key things remain the same under the new name:
● commitment to the long-term conservation of New Zealand’s most significant heritage places, including own role as custodian of 48 historic properties
● connection through members (membership benefits are unchanged) and supporters to the wider community
● continued status as a donee organisation, dependent on the goodwill and ongoing financial and volunteer support of the wider community for many of the outcomes the organisation achieves for heritage.

www.heritage.org.nz

Heritage New Zealand Logo

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Hotel We LIKE: Distinction Dunedin Hotel at former CPO

Reopening the former Chief Post Office building “marks a significant milestone for the restoration project, with more tenants, a three-level car park building and, eventually, the 120-apartment four-star-plus Distinction Dunedin Hotel, all to follow”. (ODT)

CPO Dunedin Chief Post Office 1930s [rootsweb.ancestry.com] re-imagedDunedin Chief Post Office (1930s)

### ODT Online Tue, 25 Mar 2014
Office workers light up CPO
By Chris Morris
The return today of a commercial tenant to Dunedin’s former chief post office building for the first time in more than 15 years marks a significant milestone in the restoration project. About 145 staff from Silver Fern Farms are expected to start work in their new headquarters – occupying the first two floors of the partially-restored building – this morning. It was the first time the building had been home to a permanent tenant since closing its doors in 1997, building owner Geoff Thomson, of Distinction Hotels, said.
Read more

Dogged controversy.
Submissions in opposition to the proposed waterfront tower hotel at 41 Wharf Street (LUC 2012-212) make frequent mention of a preference to see the old Chief Post Office restored and in use as a city hotel in The Exchange.
Dull criticism from the anti-heritage brigade has often been cast at the old building’s owner for lack of speed in making the redevelopment happen.
Geoff Thomson, a canny and diligent man, has proceeded with the retrofit of this very large government architect-designed building at the pace he can afford in the up-down market he faces. Geoff Thomson deserves significant praise for his passion and perseverance in seeing the project through as well as attending to quality tenanting and leases.

[history and significance]
█ Heritage New Zealand (HNZ) registration report: List No. 2145 (Category II)

CPO reroof (May 2011). Gerard O'Brien [odt.co.nz]Photo: Gerard O’Brien – Reroof, May 2011

Related Posts and Comments:
22.6.13 Dunedin’s former Chief Post Office
5.3.11 Former Chief Post Office, Dunedin – magazine feature…
14.8.2010 No surprises with former CPO redevelopment
12.5.10 DScene – Geoff Thomson buys back former CPO
11.5.10 DCC Media Release – Chief Post Office
16.3.10 Planning the future of Dunedin heritage buildings [recent comments]
10.11.09 Dunedin public library services
24.10.09 Rodney Wilson: Dunedin as national heritage city
20.7.09 DCC + former CPO + others(??) = a public library (yeah right)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images: rootsweb.ancestry.com – Dunedin Chief Post Office (1930s) re-imaged by whatifdunedin; odt.co.nz – Gerard O’Brien: CPO Reroof, May 2011 [screenshot]

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Owen Graham, heritage advocate

Owen Graham [odt.co.nz] re-imaged 3

### ODT Online Sun, 20 Oct 2013
Wins and the odd loss in preservation game
By Rosie Manins

Owen Graham, of Dunedin, counts the preservation of the Athenaeum Library in the Octagon as one of the highlights of his six years as the Otago-Southland area manager for the New Zealand Historic Places Trust.
Longtime heritage advocate Owen Graham hopes his grandchildren will benefit from his work to preserve Otago’s history.
Mr Graham recently ended his six-year tenure as the Otago-Southland area manager for the New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT).
The Dunedin resident spent about 26 years before that in a similar role for the Department of Conservation, and said going into the corporate industry after more than three decades working for the Government was a refreshing change.
His work to advocate the values of heritage throughout the region was often met with opposition and was not without controversy.
Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
9.4.13 DCC sells Athenaeum, 23 The Octagon
9.6.12 City Property to compete more obviously in the market…
17.1.12 DCC living beyond its means [all spending and debt not declared]
21.2.11 The proactive heritage development lobby EXISTS in Dunedin

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: odt.co.nz – Owen Graham, re-imaged by Whatifdunedin

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A museum. Laying poor management, bullying, and much more, to rest.

First, we received a very fair assessment:

ODT 2.9.13 Peter Entwisle - Otago Museum (page 9)ODT 2.9.13 Peter Entwisle – Art Beat, Opinion (page 9)

And now, this week’s tidy and brave acknowledgement:

ODT 25.9.13 Letter to the editor (page 17)ODT 25.9.13 Letter to the editor (page 17)

****

Otago Museum re-imaged [newzealandtimesfortwo.blogspot.com] copyOmmmmmmmmmm.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr | What if? Dunedin… A blog about the social and built environment at Dunedin.

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Heritage: Old BNZ, Dunedin —restored

Work on the historic bank included strengthening the structure from 67% of building code requirements to 100% and installing a full fire sprinkler system.

Old BNZ c.1888 [FA Coxhead] re-imaged 1205 Princes St – Old BNZ c.1888 (photo by FA Coxhead re-imaged)

With Silver Fern [Farms] also moving into the old chief post office, it will give the Exchange momentum. The shops will do better and it will give the whole area more impetus. –Michael van Aart

### ODT Online Sat, 27 Jul 2013
Refurbished bank building ready for law firm
By Nigel Benson
Dunedin’s former commercial heart – the Exchange – will pulsate with new life next week. With scaffolding removed and tradesmen gone, the 130-year-old Bank of New Zealand building in Princes St will become the new home to commercial law firm Van Aart Sycamore Lawyers on Wednesday. The occupation of the building, which is considered architect William Barnett Armson’s (1834-1883) masterpiece, follows an 18-month restoration project.
“We’re really looking forward to moving in,” firm director Michael van Aart said yesterday. “The building is dramatic and one of a kind. We have to celebrate the unique features we have here in Dunedin and heritage is certainly one of them. The Exchange was the heart of New Zealand’s economy when it was built.”
The building had been untenanted for the past 13 years. Van Aart Sycamore Lawyers had been based in Radio House for the past six years and the move would be good for the Exchange, Mr van Aart believed.
Read more

Old BNZ, Armson drawing no. 10 (Princes St facade) 2Armson drawing no. 10, Princes St facade with secondary doorway

Readings:
New Zealand Historic Places Trust – Category 1 Historic Place
(No. 7299) Registration Report – the history and significance

[wikipedia] Princes Street, Dunedin
[wikipedia] Bank of New Zealand

Book: John Barsby, The BNZ Building, Princes Street Dunedin (Southern Heritage Trust, 2011)

Related Post and Comments:
26.2.13 Bank of New Zealand Building, 205 Princes St (cnr Rattray)
[more images]

Banking desk from former BNZ Bank, Otago Settlers Museum [nzmuseums.co.nz]The banking desk designed by architect Robert A Lawson is held by Otago Settlers Museum; and an original ornamental fire surround from the bank is installed at Antrim House (NZHPT National Office) in Wellington (photographs in Barsby). It is thought one more fire surround went to another Wellington residence.

Drawing for write-up desk, Old BNZ (RA Lawson)RA Lawson, Drawing for write-up desk, Old BNZ

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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