Tag Archives: Conservation

SAVE Sammy’s (former His Majesty’s Theatre & Agricultural Hall)

Agricultural Hall. Burton Brothers studio. Te Papa Archives [C.012324]

His Majesty's Theatre, Dunedin [render via realestate.co.nz]His Majesty’s Theatre, Dunedin [render via realestate.co.nz]

Sammy's on Crawford [dunedinmusic.com]Sammy’s portico to Crawford Street [dunedinmusic.com]

REAL ESTATE BLURB | Built 1896 Agricultural Hall 1902 Renamed His Majesty’s Theatre 1983 Sammy’s Cabaret & Restaurant
Time for someone else to take over the reins – with fresh enthusiasm and ideas for this iconic Dunedin property. Located in the heart of Dunedin’s rapidly developing ‘Warehouse Precinct’ it lends itself to a multitude of uses. Building 1500m with frontages to both Crawford & Vogel Streets. http://www.remax.co.nz/10395003

‘An offer pending consent for Sammy’s would more likely mean plans to considerably alter or demolish the building.’ –Glen Hazelton, DCC Policy Planner (Heritage)

“It’s already protected under our Act, that’s the main thing.” –Matthew Schmidt, HNZ Otago Southland regional archaeologist

### ODT Online Wed, 18 Nov 2015
Uncertain future for venue
By Craig Borley
Demolition could be an option for Sammy’s, one of Dunedin’s most loved live music venues and one of the warehouse precinct’s largest buildings. On the market for “a few months” and with a list price of $240,000, the 1896 building had attracted attention from several potential buyers, owner Sam Chin said yesterday. Interest from one of those potential buyers was contingent on gaining a resource consent, Mr Chin said. He could not name the potential buyer and did not know what that resource consent was for.
Read more


Sammy's Dunedin, NZ 7.9.12 [Sola Rosa via staticflickr.com]Sammy’s Dunedin NZ 7.9.12 [Sola Rosa via staticflickr.com]

Sammy's [alizarinlizard.blogspot.co.nz]Sammy’s (2011) [alizarinlizard.blogspot.co.nz]

“….we got back to Dunedin by lunchtime and unloaded the P.A gear into Sammys then went home an slept the rest of the day till we had to come back an sound check..
but yeah, played later on that night and had a blast. Sammys looks absolutely amazing now days if you havent seen it already.”
–Alizarin Lizard, Dunedin psych-pop quartet

But what looked good at night under lights in 2011 was profoundly “trouble” due to lack of diligent building repair and maintenance, or any appreciation for fire safety…. and more words from Mr Chin….

[via comments at What if? Dunedin]

June 1, 2011 at 2:58 am
### D Scene 1-6-11
Future of Sammy’s uncertain after eviction (page 3)
The future of notable Dunedin music venue Sammy’s is uncertain, after the eviction earlier this week of the operators of the Crawford St business. Building owner Sam Chin told D Scene yesterday that he had moved into the venue on Monday night and changed the locks. “The venue is closed for now and we’re just cleaning things up.”
{continues} #bookmark [search required]

June 2, 2011 at 8:40 pm
(2 June, 8:32pm) @DunedinTV Sammy’s closed down due to being in a complete state of disrepair http://tinyurl.com/43dprnf #channel9 #dunedin #tv #nz

June 23, 2011 at 2:33 pm
### ODT Online Thu, 23 Jun 2011
Nightclub owner angry over damage at venue
By Nigel Benson
Sammy’s owner Sam Chin has experienced some wild nights at the nightclub over the years. But he was not prepared for the sight which greeted him when he changed the locks on the building three weeks ago, after not receiving rent from the lessee since November. […] The venue opened in 1896 as the Agricultural Hall, before being renamed His Majesty’s Theatre, and has a long history as a hall, theatre and live music venue. Mr Chin said he wanted to maintain that tradition and reopen it for concerts next month.
Read more

August 7, 2011 at 11:36 am
### ODT Online Sun, 7 Aug 2011
Sammy’s set to reopen this month
By Nigel Benson
Sammy’s will reopen this month after being closed in June for refurbishment. Owner Sam Chin shut the venue after the building fell into disrepair. He said yesterday demand had led to him taking bookings again. […] “We had a lot of inquiries about when we were going to reopen. It’s such a good space with plenty of room for 500-plus people. We’ve already got three or four university graduation dinners booked in over the next couple of weeks.”
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr


Filed under Architecture, Business, Concerts, Construction, DCC, Democracy, Design, Dunedin, Economics, Heritage, Heritage NZ, Inspiration, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Tourism, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

Dunedin Heritage Fund: Latest funding round | recipient building projects

### ODT Online Tue, 20 Oct 2015
Heritage fund contributes to renaissance
By Craig Borley
Another collection of old Dunedin buildings is to get a council cash injection as the city continues its renaissance. The 10 buildings received a combined $113,500 at this month’s meeting of the Dunedin City Council’s heritage fund committee.
Read more + Images

The grants
• Kelsey Yaralla Kindergarten, Trent Ave, North Dunedin: $5000 (earthquake strengthening)
• Golden Leaf International, 16 Manse St: $10,000 (earthquake strengthening)
• Empire Hotel, 395 Princes St: $5500 (earthquake strengthening report, prior to facade restoration)
• Gresham Hotel, 42 Queens Gardens: $20,000 (exterior restoration)
• Former stables, 218 Crawford St – $20,000 (reuse)
• Stafford House, 2 Stafford St – $5000 (fire upgrade)
• Loan and Mercantile Building, 33 Thomas Burns St – $20,000 (facade cleaning and restoration)
• Married quarters, Quarantine Island: $3000 (strengthening)
• Glenfalloch: $5000 (conservation plan update)
• Carpet Court, 115 Cumberland St: $20,000 (reuse)

TOTAL: $113,500

Dunedin Heritage Fund graphic 1DUNEDIN HERITAGE FUND

The Dunedin City Council and the New Zealand Historic Places Trust (now Heritage New Zealand) jointly administer the Dunedin Heritage Fund to support the protection and conservation of Dunedin’s built heritage, as well as the continued use and appreciation of these places by the community.

The Heritage Fund Committee has the ability to make grants or loans to the owner or occupier of any historic place within Dunedin for the purpose of assisting that owner or occupier to manage, maintain or preserve that historic place.

The Dunedin Heritage Fund can provide incentive funding for a wide range of works. These include:

i. Essential repairs, stabilisation or core structural works.
ii. Restoration projects.
iii. Upgrades to code/regulation standards to enable contemporary use of heritage places, eg fire, earthquake, access provisions.
iv. Specific “like with like” material replacement/maintenance projects that protect the integrity of heritage buildings (eg slate or timber shingle roofing; copper gutters/downpipes; wooden joinery; stained glass; stonework; pressed tin ceilings; etc)
v. Preparation of heritage conservation plans.
vi. Emergency or protective works to protect heritage fabric.

Note: Routine maintenance will not normally be a high priority for assistance.

█ For more information and guidelines for how to apply, go to:
Dunedin Heritage Funding Application (DCC website)

Glen Hazelton, DCC Policy Planner (Heritage) 03 477 4000
Jonathan Howard, HNZ Otago Southland Area Manager 03 477 9871

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr


Filed under #eqnz, Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Democracy, Design, Dunedin, Economics, Heritage, Heritage NZ, Innovation, Inspiration, Media, New Zealand, NZHPT, Project management, Property, Site, Structural engineering, Tourism, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

Vogel Street Party —Sat, 10 October

Vogel St Party banner
Admission: FREE

The inaugural Vogel Street Party was held last year in conjunction with the first ever Dunedin Street Art Festival; this year’s event will again be staged in the warehouse precinct and will collaborate with the Dunedin UNESCO City of Literature group for a party themed around Literature and Light.

LITERATURE To celebrate Dunedin’s creative city status as a UNESCO City of Literature Dunedin, New Zealand. You can find us sitting alongside only 10 other cities in the world that hold this status, including Edinburgh, Melbourne, Dublin, Prague & more.

LIGHT As 2015 is the International Year of Light, the VSP will be Dunedin’s major effort to join in the world-wide celebration of light and light based technologies.

Vogel Street Party image 685083-320448-34 1

The events, exhibitions and activities will follow these themes and showcase the talent and creativity we have hidden in our city.

The Vogel Street Party 2015 — fun attractions for people of all ages.
PARTY STARTS 10 October at 3pm.
Note start times vary for Open Hours at Heritage Buildings.

█ Webpage: http://vogelstparty.nz/

█ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/1611938749075531/

█ Download: Vogel Street Party PROGRAMME

OPEN Buildings [excerpt from programme – click to enlarge]

Vogel Street Party 2015 open buildings

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr


Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, Design, Dunedin, Events, Fun, Heritage, Innovation, Inspiration, New Zealand, People, Property, Site, Tourism, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

Dunedin Prison: Community Trust grant for restoration

39 Dunedin Television Published on Sep 17, 2015
Historic prison restoration gets kickstart

● Resource consent granted for conservation and repair
● Funding from Otago Community Trust
● New visitor centre
● Prison tours
● Restaurant for courtyard

### dunedintv.co.nz Thu, 17 Sep 2015
Historic prison restoration gets kickstart
A $90,000 grant is kickstarting the project to restore Dunedin’s historic prison to its former glory. The money will enable the Dunedin Prison Charitable Trust to start exterior repairs. And that means members are finally able to turn their vision into reality.
Ch39 Link

[click to enlarge]DCC Webmap - 2 Castle Street (former) Dunedin PrisonDCC Webmap – 2 Castle Street, former Dunedin Prison [Jan/Feb 2013]

Dunedin Prison Charitable Trust

Related Posts and Comments:
16.9.15 DPAG exhibition talk, Sun 20 Sep —Jonathan Howard on Dunedin 1865
7.9.15 Public petition to save Courthouse for courts use
30.8.15 DPAG exhibition | Dunedin 1865: A City Rises…
23.8.15 1865 Dunedin —Heritage Festival 2015 ‘The Open City’ … 29 Aug
23.8.15 1865 Dunedin —Heritage Festival 2015 Shoreline Trail launch
11.7.15 Dunedin Law Courts “an incredible historic building” –Minister
14.5.15 Russell Lund on Ministry closure of Dunedin Law Courts
14.5.15 Justice at Dunedin
2.5.15 Ministry serves INJUSTICE for Dunedin Courthouse #HistoricHeritage
28.2.13 Tour the old prison in March (2013)
20.9.12 Dunedin Prison
6.6.12 Dunedin Prison purchased by trust
18.10.11 Dunedin Prison Charitable Trust

█ For more, enter the term *heritage* in the search box at right.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Standard Building, 201 Princes Street —then and today

Standard Fire and Marine Insurance Company of New Zealand Building (1875)
Architect: Mason and Wales

Standard Building IMG_20150829_130631 (7)Standard Building IMG_20150829_130847 (2c)

Standard Building IMG_20150829_130847 (1b)Standard Buildiing IMG_20150829_130418 (7a)

█ Ideas: https://www.pinterest.com/throughjo/staircasing/

### ODT Online Sat, 29 Aug 2015
Surprises in old buildings
By Craig Borley
The doors to some of Dunedin’s historic buildings will be opened to the public today as the city’s heritage festival continues. The Dunedin Heritage Festival began yesterday with the “Dunedin 1865: A City Rises” photographic exhibition in the Dunedin Public Art Gallery. The festival finishes tomorrow. A major draw is the tours today and tomorrow of 64 historic buildings, which will be raising their customary barriers to the public […] the festival would also include a children’s heritage trail at Toitu Otago Settlers Museum, a walking trail following Dunedin’s original shoreline and a special service in First Church.
Read more

### ODT Online Tue, 2 Jun 2015
‘Absolutely incredible’ revamp of heritage building
By John Gibb
An “absolutely incredible” conservation and adaptive reuse project is nearing completion in Dunedin. This work on the Standard Building in Princes St, including extensive earthquake strengthening [and restoration of the Italian-style facade] has been undertaken as momentum grows to further revitalise the Exchange area, and a wave of adaptive reuse work continues to transform the nearby warehouse precinct. […] The project also includes the Stanton Building, situated behind the Standard Building, and backing on to the council’s Dowling St car park. A crucial – and previously largely hidden – feature of the redevelopment is an innovative, light-filled multilevel internal atrium, making extensive use of glass, which will link the two buildings and provide access to the various floors.
Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
23.8.15 1865 Dunedin —Heritage Festival 2015 ‘The Open City’ Sat 29 August
23.8.15 1865 Dunedin —Heritage Festival 2015 Shoreline Trail launch
17.3.12 Call for photographs or building plans – Standard Building….
24.10.11 Former Standard Insurance building, 201 Princes St, Dunedin

Post and 4 smartphone images by Elizabeth Kerr

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DCC: $6.2M propagation house —Dunedin Botanic Garden

Propagation House at Dunedin Botanic Garden via Ch39

Otago Daily Times Published on Aug 6, 2015
Praise for garden’s ‘striking’ new facility
The biggest investment in the Dunedin Botanic Garden’s history can simulate arid deserts, tropical forests and sub-antarctic islands on the slopes of Signal Hill.

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Botanic Garden’s New Propagation House Opened

This item was published on 06 Aug 2015

The Dunedin Botanic Garden’s new propagation house is a wonderful addition to the Garden’s celebrated features, Mayor of Dunedin Dave Cull says.

“In many ways the propagation and nursery facilities are the engine room of the Garden. This modern facility provides excellent conditions for plants as they are nurtured before going on public display around the Garden. This impressive new building helps us reinforce our reputation as a Garden of International Significance,” Mr Cull says.

The new propagation house was officially opened this afternoon at a civic opening with invited guests. An open day, at a date to be advised, will be held in spring so members of the public can tour the new facility. The new facility, on Lovelock Avenue, replaces the old and dilapidated glasshouses and plant nursery near the aviary. Work on the $6.2 million project began in October 2013 and the completed building was handed over in May this year.

Botanic Garden (Curator) Team Leader Alan Matchett says the new propagation facility provides the space and technology for the Garden to produce a more extensive range of plants from succulents and cacti, to alpines, tropical, subtropical, and ferns and orchids. The need for an updated facility had been apparent for some years as the former glasshouses, built in the early 1900s, began to deteriorate and the environmental management systems became less energy efficient and inadequate to produce the variety of plants needed by the Garden. The new facility provides about 600sq m of indoor space and has been designed to make the most of natural elements, such as the sun. Environmental conditions in the seven glasshouses can be controlled centrally to suit the different varieties of plants growing in each area. Watering and humidity levels are now computer controlled. The glasshouses can hold more than 12,000 plants, excluding seedlings.

As well as providing plant nursery facilities, the new building provides a base for education activities for school groups, public workshops and demonstrations. It also provides room for the Garden’s long-time supporters, the Friends of the Garden, to work. The new propagation house is the first part of a larger vision for that area of the Garden, which includes establishing a café, and visitors’ centre. Moving the nursery and glasshouses means the site they currently occupy in the upper garden can be developed to achieve its potential as a prime landscape feature.

Contact Dunedin Botanic Garden (Curator) Team Leader on 03 477 4000.
DCC Link

█ 21.1.15 ODT: Propagation unit preview [photographs]

● Culmination of 19-year journey, nursery replaces 90-year facility

### ODT Online Sat, 8 Aug 2015
Praise for garden’s ‘striking’ new facility
By Craig Borley
The biggest investment in the Dunedin Botanic Garden’s history can simulate arid deserts, tropical forests and sub-antarctic islands on the slopes of Signal Hill. The garden’s new propagation and nursery facility was completed in May but officially opened on Thursday, showcasing its seven separate growing environments – alpine, arid succulent, temperate, arid cacti, subtropical, tropical, and propagation.
Read more

● New nursery designed with school groups in mind

### ODT Online Sat, 8 Aug 2015
Maintaining a living museum
By Craig Borley
There are public parks and public gardens with great collections of plants, but they are not botanic gardens, Dunedin Botanic Garden propagation services officer Alice Lloyd-Fitt said yesterday. Explaining why the garden needed a nursery and propagation facility, she said a botanic garden’s point of difference was its role as a living museum. Education, conservation and plant collection roles all mattered, and those roles could not be filled without a functional nursery.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: (top) 39 Dunedin Television – Propagation House [screenshot]


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Captain Cook Hotel adaptive re-use

Cook Hotel 1 [Google Street View Nov 2012]354 Great King Street [Google Street View Nov 2012]

### ODT Online on Wed, 5 Aug 2015
Bringing ‘The Cook’ back to life
By Damian George
Patrons will be able to toast the reopening of Dunedin’s historic Captain Cook Tavern by Christmas, the project’s architect says. The venue, a popular jaunt for Dunedin’s student population, was founded in 1860 but closed in June last year. […] Architect Ed Elliott, of Queenstown company Elliott Architects Ltd, said a large emphasis of the refurbishment was placed on preserving the building’s character when design plans were drawn up.
Read more

█ The Cook Hotel is now at 70% seismic strengthening.

Otago Daily Times Published on Aug 4, 2015
Bringing ‘The Cook’ back to life
Patrons will be able to toast the reopening of Dunedin’s historic Captain Cook Tavern by Christmas, the project’s architect says.

Michael Brown established the hotel in 1864. The original “Cook”, a wooden structure, was pulled down in 1873 to make way for a brick and stone building which stands today. The replacement was designed by architect David Ross (1828-1908).

Cook Hotel - Otago Witness 29.11.1873 p19 News of the Week [Papers Past]Otago Witness 29.11.1873 Issue 1148 (page 19)

### otago.ac.nz Otago Magazine Issue 40
Whatever happened to…
The Cook?

There would be few Otago alumni who don’t have some sort of story about The Cook.
Built in the 1870s, The Captain Cook Hotel (to use its full name) has been part of North Dunedin as long as the University of Otago itself, becoming woven into the backdrop of student life.
When word of its imminent closure started circulating in 2013 it is fair to say there was widespread dismay at the loss of what was seen as a Dunedin institution. On the day it closed its doors, in June 2013, people who had not set foot in the pub since they were students made sure they went in to toast The Cook and to share their stories and memories.
Since then the two-storey brick building has been wrapped in a scaffolding cocoon while a transformation takes place. The owners – Chris James, Noel Kennedy and Greg Paterson – are having the building taken back to its original look, right down to the old traditional corner entrance to the downstairs front bar.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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