Tag Archives: Climate control

ELEMENTAL | UC Innovation Center

An open and eco-friendly university building.

Location: San Joa­quín Cam­pus | Uni­ver­si­dad Ca­tó­li­ca de Chi­le | San­tia­go, Chi­le
Client: Grupo Angelini | Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile

Category Winner: Architecture
Designs of the Year 2015, Design Museum, London

Architects: ELEMENTAL (Chile)

“Santiago’s climate requires to change the conventional approach to working space design. We substituted the contemporary typical glass skin, responsible for serious greenhouse effect in interiors, for a thermal mass on the perimeter that avoids undesired heat gains. On the other hand, innovation and knowledge creation requires increasing encounters among people, so openness is desired. We multiplied open air squares throughout the building’s entire height and proposed a permeable atrium core so that while circulating vertically, people could see what others are doing. This reversed placement of opaqueness and transparency is the way sustainability and human relationships informed the form.”

Construction Year: 2012-2014
Budget: USD 18 million

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ELEMENTAL (Alejandro Aravena, Gonzalo Arteaga, Juan Cerda, Victor Oddó, Diego Torres) is a Do Tank founded in 2001, focusing on projects of public interest and social impact, including housing, public space, infrastructure and transportation. A hallmark of the firm is a participatory design process in which the architects work closely with the public and end users. ELEMENTAL has built work in Chile, the United States, Mexico, China and Switzerland. After the 2010 earthquake and tsunami that hit Chile, ELEMENTAL was called to work on the reconstruction of the city of Constitución, where we had to integrate all the previous experiences. The approach we developed proved to be useful for other cases where city design was used to solve social and political conflicts. At the moment, we keep on expanding into new fields of action.

█ Website: http://www.elementalchile.cl/

Photography: Cristobal Palma, Felipe Diaz Contardo (www.fotoarq.com), Nina Vidic, Nico Saieh

Social housing, Incremental housing, Half a good house instead of a small one…. Housing as investment

Kosovo Architecture Foundation Published on Oct 8, 2015
Prishtina Architecture Week 2015, Day 4, Alejandro Aravena
Principal of Alejandro Aravena Architects, established in 1994 and, since 2006, Executive Director of ELEMENTAL, a for profit company with social interest working in projects of infrastructure, transportation, public space and housing, partnering with Universidad Catolica de Chile and COPEC, Chilean Oil Company.

He has been member of the Pritzker Prize Jury since 2009. The laureates chosen during his presence in the Jury have been: Peter Zumthor (2009), SANAA Kazuyo Sejima (2010), Eduardo Souto de Moura (2011), Wang Shu (2012), Toyo Ito (2013) and Shigeru Ban (2014). He was named Honorary International Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) in 2009; member of the Board of the Cities Program of the London School of Economics, London, since 2011; Regional Advisory Board Member of the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies;

Board Member of the Holcim Foundation, Zurich, Switzerland, since 2013; Foundational Member of the Chilean Society of Public Policies; Leader of the Helsinki Design Lab for SITRA, the Finnish Innovation Fund for the Government of Finland to design a national strategy towards carbon neutrality; and Board Member of Espacio Público, an independant chilean research center created in 2012. He was one of the 100 personalities contributing to the G+20 Rio Global Summit in June 2012, and was one of the speakers of TED Global 2014 in Rio.

Aravena was recently named as the Director of the 15th Architecture Exhibition of the Venezia Biennale.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

ELEMENTAL housingELEMENTAL | Participatory design, social modelling for housing

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DCC: $6.2M propagation house —Dunedin Botanic Garden

Propagation House at Dunedin Botanic Garden via Ch39

Otago Daily Times Published on Aug 6, 2015
Praise for garden’s ‘striking’ new facility
The biggest investment in the Dunedin Botanic Garden’s history can simulate arid deserts, tropical forests and sub-antarctic islands on the slopes of Signal Hill.

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
Botanic Garden’s New Propagation House Opened

This item was published on 06 Aug 2015

The Dunedin Botanic Garden’s new propagation house is a wonderful addition to the Garden’s celebrated features, Mayor of Dunedin Dave Cull says.

“In many ways the propagation and nursery facilities are the engine room of the Garden. This modern facility provides excellent conditions for plants as they are nurtured before going on public display around the Garden. This impressive new building helps us reinforce our reputation as a Garden of International Significance,” Mr Cull says.

The new propagation house was officially opened this afternoon at a civic opening with invited guests. An open day, at a date to be advised, will be held in spring so members of the public can tour the new facility. The new facility, on Lovelock Avenue, replaces the old and dilapidated glasshouses and plant nursery near the aviary. Work on the $6.2 million project began in October 2013 and the completed building was handed over in May this year.

Botanic Garden (Curator) Team Leader Alan Matchett says the new propagation facility provides the space and technology for the Garden to produce a more extensive range of plants from succulents and cacti, to alpines, tropical, subtropical, and ferns and orchids. The need for an updated facility had been apparent for some years as the former glasshouses, built in the early 1900s, began to deteriorate and the environmental management systems became less energy efficient and inadequate to produce the variety of plants needed by the Garden. The new facility provides about 600sq m of indoor space and has been designed to make the most of natural elements, such as the sun. Environmental conditions in the seven glasshouses can be controlled centrally to suit the different varieties of plants growing in each area. Watering and humidity levels are now computer controlled. The glasshouses can hold more than 12,000 plants, excluding seedlings.

As well as providing plant nursery facilities, the new building provides a base for education activities for school groups, public workshops and demonstrations. It also provides room for the Garden’s long-time supporters, the Friends of the Garden, to work. The new propagation house is the first part of a larger vision for that area of the Garden, which includes establishing a café, and visitors’ centre. Moving the nursery and glasshouses means the site they currently occupy in the upper garden can be developed to achieve its potential as a prime landscape feature.

Contact Dunedin Botanic Garden (Curator) Team Leader on 03 477 4000.
DCC Link

█ 21.1.15 ODT: Propagation unit preview [photographs]

● Culmination of 19-year journey, nursery replaces 90-year facility

### ODT Online Sat, 8 Aug 2015
Praise for garden’s ‘striking’ new facility
By Craig Borley
The biggest investment in the Dunedin Botanic Garden’s history can simulate arid deserts, tropical forests and sub-antarctic islands on the slopes of Signal Hill. The garden’s new propagation and nursery facility was completed in May but officially opened on Thursday, showcasing its seven separate growing environments – alpine, arid succulent, temperate, arid cacti, subtropical, tropical, and propagation.
Read more

● New nursery designed with school groups in mind

### ODT Online Sat, 8 Aug 2015
Maintaining a living museum
By Craig Borley
There are public parks and public gardens with great collections of plants, but they are not botanic gardens, Dunedin Botanic Garden propagation services officer Alice Lloyd-Fitt said yesterday. Explaining why the garden needed a nursery and propagation facility, she said a botanic garden’s point of difference was its role as a living museum. Education, conservation and plant collection roles all mattered, and those roles could not be filled without a functional nursery.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: (top) 39 Dunedin Television – Propagation House [screenshot]

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Mis(t)apprehension: website visits, not bookings?

Is nothing real any more?
It’s not enough to be ‘curious and beautiful’. Especially not when Tourism Dunedin parades support for a 28-storey $100m hotel to be plonked on the waterfront – a complete stranger to business viability – the visual manifestation to destroy, not enhance, Dunedin’s cultural heritage landscape.
Sounds more like your death wish, TD. Y’know, the times when young boys get squelched by tired old hacks, the paunches in suits sprinkling loose cash made from the stadium con.

### ODT Online Sat, 23 Jun 2012
Tourism drive draws response
By Rosie Manins
Tourism Dunedin dropped 75,000 flyers in letterboxes throughout Christchurch, Canterbury, Central Otago and Southland late last month to advertise winter events and specials in the city. The Curious and Beautiful campaign was shaping up to be a major success, with bookings flooding in and thousands of visits to an associated website, Tourism Dunedin chief executive Hamish Saxton said.

Mr Saxton said the online traffic was considered “very good” and had been backed up by positive feedback from Dunedin tourism operators and accommodation providers. “We haven’t got actual booking figures from them yet, but…”

Read more

****

How can you tell it’s winter in Dunedin? Treat the locomotive house as your very own barometer. Climatically, the thing acts like a (tourist) bus.

### ODT Online Sat, 23 Jun 2012
Loco lost in mist
By Rosie Manins
Condensation is the latest issue plaguing the locomotive display at the Otago Settlers Museum in Dunedin. Sunny days and chilly nights have caused condensation to form on the outside of the glass case recently, prompting a review of the structure’s design. Project manager Adrian Thein, of Octa Associates, said the condensation problem came as a surprise because natural ventilation had been factored into the building.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Davies admits problems with stadium operation

The question would be whether a business case could be made for the “five figure” – less than $100,000 – investment by DVML, rather than expecting the council to contribute more funding.

### ODT Online Sat, 3 Dec 2011
Stadium sound and wind fixes likely
By Chris Morris
Steps to improve sound quality, block wind and speed up service at Dunedin’s Forsyth Barr Stadium could be in place within months, stadium boss David Davies says. He acknowledged complaints from some fans about long queues for food and drinks in the North Stand, criticism of the sound quality in some areas, and problems caused by gale-force winds on the night. Because of that, consideration would be given to purchasing sound drapes to improve the way sound bounced off some of the venue’s concrete and steel surfaces, as well as drapes or shutters to block wind.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Stadium: disabled user experience

### ODT Online Tue, 29 Nov 2011
Opinion
Access, view, toilets, pass; temperature, fail
By Warren Palmer – Dunedin
What has the Forsyth Barr Stadium become from the point of view of the disabled? This is my chief interest. I have been to four rugby matches, one Otago game and three World Cup games, each time sitting in the area set aside for the disabled in the North Stand. (As yet I cannot comment on the seating in the South Stand.)
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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