Tag Archives: City branding

Dunedin: city marketing @@@

### ODT Online on Fri, 17 May 2013
City planning single marketing arm
By Debbie Porteous
Total responsibility for marketing Dunedin to the outside world will not be transferred to Tourism Dunedin, after a series of concerns were raised about a proposal to do so.
Dunedin city councillors have decided the city’s marketing functions should still be brought into a single agency, as proposed in the council’s draft annual plan for 2013-14, but not one run by Tourism Dunedin, after concerns that would not meet the main aim of having a consistent city marketing message.
In the meantime, the status quo would remain while a steering group considered options for setting up the agency, including establishing a council-owned organisation (CCO) or the council delivering all marketing functions in-house.

Investigating a single marketing agency is one of the projects outlined in the city’s economic development strategy.

The proposal outlined in the draft annual plan was to merge city-wide marketing activities into a single marketing agency that would co-ordinate tourism, events, investment, skills and migrant promotion and attraction efforts, as well as be responsible for city branding and operate Dunedin’s i-Site. The aim was more efficient and effective marketing activity.
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Report – Council – 15/05/2013
(PDF, 512.2 KB)
Marketing Agency Proposal Consultation

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Remember when . . .

I am Dunedin launch 2001 (ODT 11.1.10) detail of photo by Jane Dawber)I am Dunedin launch, January 2001
Grainy image, just like the campaign, with ‘famous’ faces (detail from a photo by Jane Dawber, ODT)

dunedin.brand.tee 1Ben Fahy, at Idealog (October 19, 2010 @ 10:25 am): “Previous branding had been done in-house by the council, including the classic slogans ‘It’s all right here’ (often exchanged for the more comical ‘It’s alright here’) and ‘I am Dunedin’. Wisely, a slogan was avoided and Dunedin is the brand (the logo, a trendy, more contemporary gothic script that embraces the town’s Scottish heritage, is inspired by Nom-D’s now famous ‘Dunedin’ t-shirts). At the same time, the campaign is also confronting some of the engrained—and perhaps negative—perceptions of the city head on…”

Similar talking-through-a hole-in-the-neck has been rebounding ever since DCC tried to brand the city without branding the city. Confused?

Related Post and Comments:
3.3.13 Tourism Dunedin —city councillors not convinced

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Business, DCC, Economics, Events, Geography, People, Politics, Project management, Tourism

What brand?

The $500,000 non brand for insiders. Yeah what she said.

### ODT Online Mon, 26 Jul 2010
Insiders invited to share city’s stories
By Nigel Benson
The Dunedin City Council will launch the first stage of its Brand Dunedin marketing strategy today. The “Insiders’ Dunedin” campaign is inviting residents to come forward with Dunedin stories which will “stimulate a sense of parochialism” and engage people. The subsequent stories will be placed on a website and used to promote the city in local, domestic and international advertising campaigns.

Dunedin residents are encouraged to visit www.insidersdunedin.co.nz with stories, videos and images, plus help identify the city’s local characters and “hidden gems”.

People can also write to the Otago Daily Times with their stories at PO Box 517 with “Insiders’ Dunedin” on the envelope.

DCC city marketing team leader Jennifer Hooker yesterday told the ODT that the campaign would be promoted throughout the greater Dunedin area starting today.
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Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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bringing in consultants to improve the city’s dangerous image

[oh, some lovable phrases!!!]
[as residents of Dunedin City reel in horror from vile crooked budget news]

. . . the problem in [Dunedin] was not branding . . . we didn’t need to come up with a style campaign . . . our challenge has been to open doors in that sealed wall, doors so that people can pass through and go on participating in the construction of hope . . .

### utne.com 1/28/2010 3:06:04 PM
Politics
How Architecture Transformed a Violent City
By Danielle Maestretti
Over the past ten or so years, the city of Medellín, Colombia, has undergone a high-profile transformation, shedding its reputation as one of the world’s most violent cities. In an interview with architect Giancarlo Mazzanti in the art magazine Bomb, former Medellín mayor Sergio Fajardo discusses the vital role of architecture and design in the city’s renewal, which he explains was driven by the concept of “the most beautiful for the most humble”—a departure, or “rupture,” he says, from the notion “that anything you give to the poor is a plus.”
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Not making light of Medellín’s situation, rather we’re soaking in the concept of “concrete community improvement”, as we make behind-the-scenes arrangements (including the payment of enormous backhanders) to take over and adapt the new stadium at Dunedin, by June 2010.

Someone has already suggested it should become a holding pond for sludge – yeah, but we can turn that into future renewable energy generation.

Did you really think encasing rugby in a concrete box was a long-term cash-maker, something you could throw into the deep blue sea of “branding” to remove evidence of squandering citizens’ meagre stash (sorry, trash) piles?

SOS DUNEDIN

Related Posts and Comments:
28.1.10 Brand strategy for Dunedin
14.1.10 Dunedin, let’s explore “renewal partnerships”
14.1.10 Superficial Dunedin sloganism
12.1.10 Learning curve 4 SLOGANS
11.1.10 #NewDunedinSlogan by twerps (darn, tweeps)
11.1.10 Collaboration for Dunedin’s promotional strategy

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Design, Economics, Politics, Project management, Stadiums, Urban design