Tag Archives: Buildings

Dame Zaha Hadid 1950 – 2016

Zaha Hadid by Philip Sinden (1)

Zaha Hadid by Mary McCartney [dezeen.com] 1

31 March 2016 | Miami
The acclaimed Iraqi-British architect Zaha Hadid, the first female winner of the top Pritzker Architecture Prize, has died at the age of 65. Born in Baghdad in October 31, 1950, Hadid first studied mathematics at the American University in Lebanon, before pursuing architecture at the Architectural Association in London in 1972. In 1979, she established her own practice in London, the Zaha Hadid Architects.

Last year it was announced that British architect Zaha Hadid was to become the 2016 recipient of the Royal Gold Medal for architecture, marking the first time a woman has won the prize in her own right. Awarded by the Royal Institute of British Architects, the medal is presented annually in recognition of a significant contribution to the profession. Hadid is the first women without a male partner to win the award in its 167-year history. Hadid said she was proud to be the first woman to receive the honour in her own right. “We now see more established female architects all the time. That doesn’t mean it’s easy,” she said.

Necessarily having to disperse effort through a studio production, rather than being a lone artist, she cottoned on to the potential of the computer to turn space upon itself. So Zaha with her mathematics background seized upon this, she has been smart enough to pull in some formidable computational talent without being phased by its ways. Meanwhile, with paintings and special small drawings Zaha continued to lead from the front. Read more at Dezeen

Rosey Chan Published on Sep 28, 2013
“Parametricism” by Patrik Schumacher – Zaha Hadid Architects – AADRL
Music by Rosey Chan – entirely recorded on acoustic piano + prepared piano

Dezeen Published on Dec 2, 2015
Zaha Hadid unveils prefabricated Volu dining pavilion at Design Miami
Architects Zaha Hadid and Patrik Schumacher have designed a dining pavilion shaped like an open clam shell.

Zaha Hadid Architects http://www.zaha-hadid.com
An international architecture and design firm founded by Zaha Hadid, with its main office situated in Clerkenwell, London. We work at all scales and in all sectors. We create transformative cultural, corporate, residential and other spaces that work in synchronicity with their surroundings.
950 projects 44 countries 400 staff 55 nations | About us 1 year ago

Architecture Today Published on Mar 21, 2016
Library and Learning Center – Campus WU / Zaha Hadid Architects
Project Development and Structural Engineering: Vasko + Partner Ingenieure (Vienna). Video by Damir Kovačić, for the video exhibition series Austrian Architecture Today. Music: The Jazz Piano – Artist: Ben Sound

ArchiveTecture Published on Oct 27, 2015
Abu Dhabi Performing Arts Centre by Zaha Hadid
A new performing arts centre housing five theatres, music hall, concert hall and opera house – conceived as a sculptural form, emerging naturally from the intersection of pedestrian pathways within a new cultural district – a growing organism that spreads through successive branches which form the structure like ‘fruits on the vine’.

SOHO China Published on Oct 8, 2014
The Story of Wangjing SOHO: Exclusive Dialogue with Zhang Xin and Zaha Hadid
SOHO China’s Wangjing SOHO, designed by Pritzker Prize winning architect Dame Zaha Hadid opened 20 September 2014, with over 20,000 visitors to Beijing’s newest architectural landmark. In a live dialogue, SOHO China CEO Zhang Xin interviews Pritzker-winning architect Dame Zaha Hadid to uncover the inspiration her design language.

SOHO China Published on May 27, 2014
Musical Interlude at Wangjing SOHO 望京SOHO水景巅峰之境
This video highlights the spectacular water features and landscape design of one of Beijing’s newest landmark architectures. Wangjing SOHO, designed by world-renowned architect Zaha Hadid, covers an area of 115,392 sq metres with a total construction area of 521,265 sq metres, and is comprised of three highrise mixed-use office and commercial buildings, and three lowrise commercial buildings, the tallest tower having a height of 200 metres. Upon completion of construction in 2014, Wangjing SOHO will be the first tall landmark architecture visible en route from the airport into the city.

ARk1T3CH Published on Jan 2, 2014
Who Dares Wins • Zaha Hadid
BBC Scotland [2013] – Español CC (duration 1:10:39)
█ [profile interview and backstory]

Dezeen Published on Aug 14, 2015
Zaha Hadid wins contest for landmark bridge across Taipei’s Tamsui River
This animation by MIR and Morean shows Zaha Hadid Architects’ proposal for a 920-metre-long bridge across the mouth of the Tamsui River in the Taiwanese capital. Billed as “the world’s largest asymmetric cable-stayed bridge with a single tower”, the Danjiang Bridge will be supported by just one 175-metre-high concrete mast to reduce its visual impact on the Taipei skyline. Its steel deck will create a new route for cars, trains and pedestrians, easing congestion on existing transport networks. Zaha Hadid Architects – which has previously completed bridges in Spain and Abu Dhabi – is partnering with engineer Sinotech Engineering Consultants and master builder Leonhardt, Andrä & Partner on the project. Read more at Dezeen

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Portraits: Zaha Hadid – Philip Sinden | Mary McCartney

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Earthquake —Stuff tells you what to do #EQNZ

Stuff (Fairfax): Large quake rocks central New Zealand
Last updated 20:48 21/07/2013
A severe magnitude 6.5 earthquake has hit central New Zealand this evening, damaging buildings, cutting power, trapping people in lifts and injuring at least two people.
GeoNet said it was centred in the Cook Strait, 20 kilometres east of Seddon at a depth of 17 kilometres. It struck at 5.09pm.
The Pacific Tsunami Centre in Hawaii said the quake did not generate a tsunami, but a number of smaller quakes have struck since – the latest, a 4.4 magnitude 25km east of Seddon at 8.27pm, followed closely by a 5.1 magnitude near Hanmer Springs.
The 6.5 magnitude quake was likely linked to a fault in the Cook Strait capable of generating far more severe shaking, GNS Science said.
If there were a sequence of events, as in Canterbury, EQC would have up to $6.5bn in cover. A spokesman for EQC minister Gerry Brownlee said EQC had “ample to cover any future event.”
Read more

(via Stuff)
What to do in an earthquake | Photos | Video: Powerful quake hits | What you need to know | Video: As the quake hit | Regional round up | Map: Recent quakes

Wellington Maritime Police senior launch master Barry Hart said a piece of previously reclaimed land along the industrial part of the waterfront had subsided into the sea, taking with it at least one shipping container. “The land has actually subsided at least a couple of metres… into the sea. One shipping container has gone into the water.”

3 News
More quakes shake North Island
Civil Defence: What to do after an earthquake

What you need to know:
• Magnitude 6.5 quake struck around 5:09pm Sunday
• Centred 20km east of Seddon, 17km deep
• GeoNet lists quake’s intensity as “severe”
• 4 injured in series of aftershocks
• Mercure on Willis St evacuated, believed to be slumping
• Featherston, Wakefield, Bolton, Willis and Webb streets closed
• All KiwiRail services suspended
• Wellington workers advised not to travel to work until at least midday Monday
• Victoria Uni, Whitireia polytech both closed until at least Tuesday

ONE News
At least one injured as severe quake strikes
Wellington’s emergency offices have been activated and USAR is on standby after a powerful earthquake shook central NZ.

GeoNet QuakesMap 21.7.13GeoNet Quakes Map 21.7.13 (click on link for updates)

#eqnz
As Wellington assesses itself and keeps people out of the CBD for safety reasons according to its Civil Defence Plan now in force following today’s significant earthquakes and tremors, readers have been hitting these links . . .

[older posts]
27.6.11 You keep asking: does Dunedin get earthquakes?
9.3.11 Dunedin earthquake proneness
4.9.10 Earthquake

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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RMA and Key’s right-wing slashers

BACKWARD STEP: Our environment is at risk if the Resource Management act is watered down.Anton Oliver [stuff.co.nz]

### stuff.co.nz Last updated 05:00 21/07/2013
Gutting the RMA – it’s time to be concerned
By Anton Oliver
Source: Sunday Star-Times
OPINION | The Resource Management Act (RMA) has sadly become a much maligned and misunderstood piece of legislation: a kind of universal public punching bag – if mentioned in conversation, it is almost obligatory to put the slipper in. To most Kiwis it represents bureaucracy and inefficiency – pen-pushing do-gooders and paper shufflers who engage us in excessively long and costly processes that get in the way of us Kiwis doing stuff.
In fact the RMA – passed in 1991 – was a means of rectifying mistakes and providing at least some environmental and social integrity to development and planning process. It was recognised by legal minds to be a world-leading piece of legislation. It protected our environment and our economy based on the premise of sustainable resource management. What’s more, it was politically robust in that it received the blessing of both major parties.
It also gave New Zealanders a chance to be heard and it facilitated local decisions made by local people. While the country’s environmental indicators such as water quality and biodiversity loss have still gone backwards – the RMA has stemmed what would otherwise have been fatal haemorrhaging.
Similarly, the RMA has protected a set of fundamental Kiwi values: the notion of fairness and equity in regard to everyone having a right to their say; industry and other activities being required to take responsibility for avoiding, remedying or mitigating adverse environmental impacts; and developments being required to have regard to effects on such things as recreation, scenic values, private property rights, and the public’s access to rivers, lakes and beaches.
That’s all about to change.
The Government plans to alter the Act to give greater weight to economic development over environmental considerations, granting to itself the right to veto any issue. You don’t have to be legal-minded to see the impact of subtle word changes. While the consideration for the “benefits” of a project remains, gone are any references to the “costs”, making a cost-benefit analysis redundant because environmental “cost” is out of the equation.
Gone, too, are the words: “maintenance and enhancement of amenity values”. That’s basically any recreational activity – walking, running, swimming, fishing, kayaking. Who likes doing that stuff anyway? Thankfully the “importance and value of historic heritage” stays. But its cobber, “protection from inappropriate subdivision and development” gets the boot – making the first clause meaningless. And my personal favourite, “maintenance and enhancement of the quality of the environment” has been politely asked to leave. Clearly such an unruly clause has no place in a legal act that’s trying to protect the environment.

The Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment, Jan Wright, has a different interpretation. She thinks the changes “muddy the overwhelming focus of the RMA, to protect the environment, and risk turning it into an Economic Development Act”. Similarly alarmed, the architect of the RMA, Sir Geoffrey Palmer, concludes: “The [proposed changes] will significantly and seriously weaken the ability of the RMA to protect the natural environment and its recreational enjoyment by all New Zealanders.”

The changes also grant considerable new powers to central government, giving it the ability to take individual consent decisions away from local councils and place them in a new national body. The changes go further still, by allowing government the right to insert provisions in local council plans without any consultation.
Read more

● Former All Black Anton Oliver is an ambassador for Water Conservation Order NZ.

Related Posts and Comments:
21.4.13 *fashionable* Heritage Dunedin and the RMA holocaust
17.3.13 RMA Bill: Public meeting 21 March
6.7.12 Recommended changes to RMA explode environmental protection

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: stuff.co.nz – Anton Oliver

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Dunedin’s former Chief Post Office

Dunedin Chief Post Office [topnews.net.nz]

### ODT Online Sat, 22 Jun 2013
Post office conversion ready to go
By Hamish McNeilly
A multimillion-dollar project to transform the former Dunedin chief post office has been delivered. Work on converting the 10-storey heritage building into a 120-apartment hotel and office space for Silver Fern Farms and other commercial tenants could begin within weeks.

Dunedin Chief Post Office [distinctionhotels.co.nz]Building owner Geoff Thomson, of Distinction Hotels, told the Otago Daily Times: “I just love the building and it was just about trying to find a way to make it stack up.”

Arrow International would spearhead the fit-out of the office space and hotel and the construction of a multilevel car park at the rear of the building. The four-star plus Distinction Dunedin hotel project would cost more than $15 million, but those involved with the project declined to confirm a figure.
However, the anchor tenancy of Silver Fern Farms, which would occupy the first two floors, and unnamed commercial tenants the third floor, would help to “underpin the building”, Mr Thomson said.
The commercial floors would be fitted out by the end of the year. Construction of a three-storey car park on its Bond St car park at the rear of the building would also be done by then. Designs had yet to be finalised for the remaining seven floors of the hotel apartments.
Read more

[history and significance]
█ Heritage New Zealand (HNZ) registration report: List No. 2145 (Category II)

Related Posts and Comments:
16.3.10 Public meeting: planning the future of Dunedin heritage buildings [updates on SFF]
2.7.12 Demolition by neglect. Townscape precincts.
6.12.11 Distinction Hotels: more work on former Chief Post Office
5.3.11 Former Chief Post Office, Dunedin – magazine feature . . .
14.8.10 No surprises with former CPO redevelopment
27.5.10 Distinction Dunedin: former chief post office
12.5.10 DScene – Geoff Thomson buys back former CPO
11.5.10 DCC Media Release – Chief Post Office
10.11.09 Dunedin public library services
23.10.09 Weekend ODT looks at The Exchange
3.9.09 Dunedin Public Library feasibility
26.8.09 DScene: Delta, STS, DCC larks
20.7.09 DCC + former CPO + others(??) = a public library (yeah right)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images: (from top) topnews.net.nz – Dunedin Chief Post Office, 283 Princes Street, Dunedin; distinctionhotels.co.nz – thumbnail; rootsweb.ancestry.com – 1930s b/w

Dunedin Chief Post Office 1930s (2) [rootsweb.ancestry.com]

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Community halls of small-town New Zealand

Michele Frey and Sara Newman
Photographs John Maillard and John O’Malley

November 2012
RRP $45
Paperback, 260pp, 235 x 235mm Full Colour
ISBN 978-1-927145-37-1

Canterbury University Press
http://www.cup.canterbury.ac.nz/catalogue/saturday_night.shtml

Yeah, it’s great being out with the jokers
When the jokers are sparking and bright,
And its great giving cheek to the sheilas
Down the hall on a Saturday night …

Peter Cape, 1958

On a Saturday Night is a warm and colourful celebration of the strength and spirit of small towns all around New Zealand. From Whakapara in the north to Mossburn in the South, community halls have been the focal point of small towns for as long as the towns have been on the map.

These halls have hosted school classrooms, general elections, stag parties, birthday parties, film screenings, Rabbiters’ Balls, flag euchre evenings, farewells and welcome-home parties for servicemen from both world wars, memorial events for those who did not return, farm auctions, clearing sales, weddings, Christmas parties, Civil Defence teams, mayoral celebrations, church services …

Some halls have been demolished and rebuilt over the decades, other have been lovingly restored several times and are still going strong. Some halls have been transported on the backs of trucks to new locations as towns have grown and changed. Fires and floods have taken their toll in more than a few cases.

Michele Frey and Sara Newman visited these halls with photographers John Maillard (North Island) and John O’Malley (South Island) to talk to the locals and try to capture the essence of what each hall has meant – and means – to its community. In these stories and pictures they have recorded an aspect of New Zealand’s unique culture that seems to be passing into history.

Michele Frey is a Strategic Planner (Natural Environment and Recreation) for Opus International Consultants Ltd in Napier. She has always had a strong affinity with the notion of community, and seized eagerly upon the idea of producing a book on small-town halls, with the opportunity it offered to gain insights into the dynamics of small New Zealand communities. Along the way she developed some lifelong friendships. This is Michele’s third book for Canterbury University Press.

Sara Newman grew up in a small town and knew all about the importance of community halls. She has had articles published in magazines in New Zealand and abroad, including Takahe and New Zealand Memories. While a member of the South Island Writers’ Group she won the Ngaio Marsh Trophy for fiction in 2009. Her work is included in several anthologies and her family history Living Between the Lines has been read on National Radio. She loved visiting the halls and meeting the people involved with them.

### radionz.co.nz Friday 26 October 2012
Country Life
with Carol Stiles, Susan Murray, Cosmo Kentish-Barnes & Duncan Smith
http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/countrylife/20121026

21:18 On a Saturday Night
Sara Newman talks about a new book she has co-written with Michelle Frey about the community halls of small town New Zealand. (10′08″)
Audio | Download: Ogg Vorbis MP3 | Embed

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Recommended changes to RMA explode environmental protection

Technical advisory group’s report recommends significant changes to section 6 of the RMA…the proposal to drop the requirement for decision makers to provide for the preservation and protection of indigenous vegetation and habitats as matters of national importance ignores Environment Court case law built up over the last 20 years.

### ODT Online Thu, 5 Jul 2012
Proposed changes reduce RMA protection
By Adam Bennett – New Zealand Herald
A Government-appointed advisory group has recommended a significant rewrite of the Resource Management Act removing references to the protection of coastal areas, wetlands, lakes and rivers and indigenous flora and fauna. Environment Minister Amy Adams released the report from a technical advisory group established after the Canterbury earthquakes with the primary task of looking at natural hazard issues relevant to the RMA arising from the quakes. “After the Canterbury earthquakes, it became clear that consents for subdivisions had been granted without any consideration of the risk of liquefaction,” Ms Adams said in a statement. However, the group’s report addresses much wider issues and recommends significant changes to section 6 of the RMA.

As it stands [section 6] instructs local authorities to recognise and provide for the protection or preservation of the natural character of the coastal environment, wetlands, lakes and rivers when considering RMA applications. They must also provide for the protection of outstanding natural features and landscapes and areas of significant indigenous vegetation or wildlife. Protection must also be provided for historic heritage and protected customary rights while public access to and along the coastal marine area, lakes and rivers must be maintained. However the group’s recommendation proposes removing the words “protection” and “preservation” from the section entirely.
Read more

****

### radionz.co.nz Friday 6 July 2012
Morning Report with Geoff Robinson & Simon Mercep
http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/morningreport

08:13 Independent report a major assault on the RMA – Opposition
Opposition parties say recommended changes to the Resource Management Act by independent advisory group are a major assault on the sustainable management of the environment. (3′57″)
Audio | Download: Ogg Vorbis MP3 | Embed

More reading via Scoop
Greens – Report ‘Major Assault On The RMA’
NZ Govt – Report on Resource Management Act principles released
Labour – RMA changes risk more litigation
ACT – RMA Principles Report Encouraging But More Boldness Required
Maori Party – Māori Party comfortable with direction of RMA report
Fish and Game NZ – RMA rejig a disaster for the environment

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Dunedin Railway Station clocktower

### ch9.co.nz July 5, 2012 – 7:06pm
The view from the Railway Station clocktower
The Dunedin Railway Station is an Edwardian monument to the era of rail, and the nineteenth century dreams of the city’s early inhabitants. And inside its clocktower are some very cool spaces the public seldom gets to see. Nine Local News squeezed through some tight manholes and got very dusty to bring those spaces to you.
Video

Image: Channel 9

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Demolition by neglect. Townscape precincts.

About which, belated (after parapet failure) “buying of engineering opinion” can make sure historic buildings come down for car parks.

On Friday, Karen Ratten of St Kilda had a letter to the editor published, ‘Why the long delay in demolition?’ (ODT 29.6.12). Ms Ratten is firstly concerned about three car parks being currently unavailable for use outside Brocklebanks Building in King Edward St, South Dunedin. She then asks why the hold up with the building’s demolition?

The question could have been, why is demolition of the listed building required at all (the building has facade protection in the district plan and is located in a listed townscape precinct) – if it’s to create interim on-site parking? Given it was (still is!) possible to tie the building together and restore it, or retain the historic facade and erect a new building behind – thereby removing the public safety issue altogether.

DCC’s Alan Worthington, Resource Consents manager, provides reply including an inference (we’re way past generalities here, Alan) that archaeological authority processes required by New Zealand Historic Places Trust for the building have contributed to delay of demolition. This is not so. He then intimates something more useful, saying: “At the same time there may be other matters the building owner is dealing with.” Bingo. Just maybe, the Brocklebank family trust hasn’t finalised building plans in order to apply for resource consent. Who knew!

The other site…

### ODT Online Sat, 30 Jun 2012
Buildings’ demise imminent
By Debbie Porteous
Scenic Circle Hotel Group director Stuart McLauchlan confirmed a crane that went up behind the N. & E.S. Paterson Ltd and Barron buildings in Rattray St this week would be bringing the partially demolished buildings down within “days”. Two separate sections of the 136-year-old Barron Building collapsed in January 2011; parapets fell on to the roof causing it to collapse inwards onto the second storey.
Read more

The Barron Building, originally known as the Banks, Barron & Co. Building, was designed by architect Henry F. Hardy, and constructed circa 1875. The Victorian-era warehouse later received a very fine interior by architect Owen E. MacFie. The first bottling plant for Speights was housed in the basement (still intact) – potentially, a stunning adjunct to Speight’s Alehouse and heritage tours.

According to specialist engineers the Barron Building could have been saved following collapse of the parapet.

Keeping up a building of this scale is not usually prohibitive, cost wise – it does require diligence. It can ‘come down’ to having motivated owners and investors.

Long before parapet failure, Barron Building required conscientious owner-stewards to carry out cyclical maintenance (seeing to weathertightness, gutter cleaning, keeping pigeons out, removing vegetation and trees from mortar, repointing and so on) and regular structural assessment towards enhancing building performance – with all resulting work to be costed and carried out in stages (at its most affordable – given that for many many years Dunedin City Council has practised leniency towards building owners in regards to bringing buildings up to code).

All the people saying pull the old buildings down because they’re “eyesores” (see ODT news report above) and asking why private building owners should be put to the cost of saving old structures like these – the answer, respectfully, is that they need to get out a bit, to see for themselves what’s actually going on in the neighbourhood.

Building owners (good investors), with vision and means, are set on maintaining, strengthening and upgrading their heritage buildings. Their efforts are attracting higher paying tenants; and incrementally/cumulatively they are raising property values in the old CBD. It’s known as “regeneration”. If you’re a building investor who isn’t participating in this upward movement (where’s your diligence?) and your property is going backwards, you need to ask yourself what’s the sense in being left behind? Get educated. Those caring for heritage building stock are starting to make real money now and for the long term. They’ve done their sums, they know what it takes.

A sizeable cluster of Dunedin’s historic buildings in the area have been or are in the process of being strengthened and re-used. They include (no particular order): Old BNZ Bank, Standard Building, Old National Bank, Bing Harris Building, Clarion Building, Bracken Court (Moray Pl), Queens Garden Court, NMA Building (former Union Steam Ship Co, Water St), former Rogan McIndoe Print Building (Crawford St), 14 Dowling St, Garrison Hall (Dowling St), former Stavely Building (cnr Bond and Jetty Sts), Wood Adams Building (19 Bond St), former Chief Post Office, former Donald Reid Store (Vogel St), Milne Brebner Building (Vogel St), 366 Princes St… and more besides.

Again, WHY are we losing the likes of Barron Building, N. & E.S. Paterson Building, and Brocklebanks Building?

If you are a heritage building owner wanting to access available information that could help you conserve, strengthen and save your building, contact Glen Hazelton, DCC Policy Planner (Heritage) phone 4774000 – or Owen Graham, NZHPT Area Manager (Otago Southland) phone 4779871.

****

### ODT Online Tue, 7 Sep 2010
Measures urged to protect heritage buildings
By John Gibb
Relatively cheap and simple measures can protect many of Dunedin’s heritage buildings from much of the kind of earthquake damage evident in Christchurch, structural engineer Lou Robinson says.
Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
8.5.12 Owners of neglected buildings
25.8.11 180 Rattray St, Dunedin: Proposed historic building demolition…
12.4.11 Public outrage – SHAME on those re$pon$ible for building neglect
4.3.11 Reaction to another instance of unthinking ad-hocism from City Hall
19.2.11 Owner of Dragon Café/Barron Building has lodged an application…
26.1.11 D Scene: Honour heritage
22.1.11 SAVE Dragon Café / Barron Building – Sign the Online Petition
13.1.11 Barron Building and Rattray Street
13.1.11 Banks, Barron & Co Building Collapse pics

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Dunedin’s turn to shine, says Travel Wire Asia

“With Christchurch still suffering from repeat aftershocks, Dunedin has become the new tourism centre on the south island. And visiting Dunedin is certainly a means of supporting the south without feeling you are in danger of tremors and [liquefaction]. It’s Dunedin’s turn to shine and it does have plenty to offer.” Travel Asia Wire

### ODT Online Mon, 9 Jan 2012
Dunedin labelled must-see tourist destination
By Hamish McNeilly
An influential Asian travel site has picked Dunedin as one of six must-see destinations for 2012. The city joins Bagan (Burma), Langkawi (Malaysia), Mui Ne (Vietnam), Gili Islands (Indonesia) and Cairns (Australia) as the “great Asian travel destinations for 2012” on the TravelwireAsia website.
Read more

### ODT Online Mon, 9 Jan 2012
Established designers and new for iD
By Matthew Haggart
A mix of new and established fashion labels will feature on the runway at the iD Dunedin Fashion Week’s signature event, being held over two nights at the Dunedin Railway Station in March. The iD Fashion Shows, on what has been dubbed “New Zealand’s longest catwalk” – the platform of the historic railway station – will welcome back several of the event’s loyal Dunedin-based labels.
Read more

iD Dunedin (via ODT)
Fashion Week: March 27-April 1
iD runway show: Dunedin Railway Station, March 30-31.
Featured designers: Nom*D, Carlson, Mild Red, Charmaine Reveley, Company of Strangers, DADA Vintage, Vaughan Geeson, RUBY and Liam.
Capsule collections labels: Cherry Cotton Candy, BurtenShaw, Jane Sutherland, Undone, DEVa’L.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Architecture Dunedin, a free published guide

### ODT Online Fri, 29 Oct 2010
Dunedin’s heritage celebrated
By Kim Dungey
Publishers weighing up which stunning buildings to include in a booklet on Dunedin architecture identified more than 100 contenders within a 6km radius. Architecture Dunedin, a free 44-page guide to the city’s architecture, will be in cafes, libraries, museums and information centres from today. It is also being sent to all local secondary schools. In the end, the team selected about 70 buildings to highlight, listing around 30 other notable sites at the back.
The booklet was developed and funded by Parker Warburton architects, with help from the New Zealand Historic Places Trust, the Dunedin City Council, Tourism Dunedin and Michael Findlay, of the University of Otago design studies department.
Read more

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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Norman Foster, [A]rchitect

As the great British architect Norman Foster turns 75, he talks to Jonathan Glancey about flying cars, his new underground city – and how he beat bowel cancer.

### guardian.co.uk Tuesday 29 June 2010 21.31 BST
Norman Foster at 75: Norman’s conquests
By Jonathan Glancey
“The other day,” says Norman Foster, “I was counting the number of aircraft I’ve flown: from sailplanes and a Spitfire to a Cessna Citation. By chance, it comes to 75.” So Foster, who turned 75 this month, has decided to make models of all 75, to hang in his own personal museum, which he keeps at his Swiss home, an 18th-century chateau set in vineyards between Lausanne and Geneva.
These model aircraft will hover over his collection of some of the 20th-century’s greatest machines, cherished for both their engineering brilliance and streamlined beauty; many of them look like winged or wheeled versions of Foster’s most innovative buildings. “At the moment,” says the architect, “I’m restoring a Citroën Sahara, designed to tackle north African dunes. I’m also thinking of getting a Bell 47 helicopter as a focal point. And I’ve had a model made of the Graf Zeppelin airship.”
The subject [architecture] is too often treated as a fine art, delicately wrapped in mumbo-jumbo. In reality, it’s an all-embracing discipline taking in science, art, maths, engineering, climate, nature, politics, economics. Every time I’ve flown an aircraft, or visited a steelworks, or watched a panel-beater at work, I’ve learned something new that can be applied to buildings.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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For urban designers, speculators and stadium nuts

We love pop-up maps!!!

Today, at Fast Company’s website, William Bostwick profiles Rob Carter’s Metropolis, a 9-minute history of Charlotte, North Carolina.

Metropolis, Bostwick says, is a trend trifecta: cartography, cut and folded paper, and urban history. The animation, made from a sequence of aerial pictures layered on top of each other, transforms Charlotte “from Native American trading post to cotton-age boom town to tower-spiked banking hub in just a few folds.”
Fast Company Link


5LoveMyself 15 February 2010
View full animation, Metropolis (2008), on Carter’s site. (9:30 mins)

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“Metropolis is a quirky and very abridged narrative history of the city of Charlotte, North Carolina. It uses stop motion video animation to physically manipulate aerial still images of the city (both real and fictional), creating a landscape in constant motion. Starting around 1755 on a Native American trading path, the viewer is presented with the building of the first house in Charlotte. From there we see the town develop through the historic dismissal of the English, to the prosperity made by the discovery of gold and the subsequent roots of the building of the multitude of churches that the city is famous for. Now the landscape turns white with cotton, and the modern city is ‘born’, with a more detailed re-creation of the economic boom and surprising architectural transformation that has occurred in the past twenty years.

Charlotte is one of the fastest growing cities in the country, primarily due to the continuing influx of the banking community, resulting in an unusually fast architectural and population expansion that shows no sign of faltering despite the current economic climate. However, this new downtown Metropolis is therefore subject to the whim of the market and the interest of the giant corporations that choose to do business there. Made entirely from images printed on paper, the animation literally represents this sped up urban planners dream, but suggests the frailty of that dream, however concrete it may feel on the ground today. Ultimately the video continues the city development into an imagined hubristic future, of more and more skyscrapers and sports arenas and into a bleak environmental future. It is an extreme representation of the already serious water shortages that face many expanding American cities today; but this is less a warning, as much as a statement of our paper thin significance no matter how many monuments of steel, glass and concrete we build.”
Vimeo Link

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Landscape architecture

Not saying these are all great examples even if the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects (AILA) thought so enough to make the video. We’re not privy to the design briefs so treat as something to think around.


AILAnationaloffice 13 February 2009
Showcasing Melbourne landscape architecture and the diversity of practice. Melbourne was the hosting city for the AILA’s 2009 national conference.

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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