Tag Archives: Building restoration

Letter from Christchurch 2 #eqnz

UPDATED

Today’s Press has more examples of high-handed action.

The Piko Whole-Foods Co-op store – an important social and architectural landmark – had its top storey removed before the owners knew what was going to happen. The heritage team at Christchurch City Council worked with the owners to try and stop the demolition but the top floor had already gone by the time they got there and its landmark value has been completely destroyed. The building had been earthquake strengthened within the past few years and though it did have some serious damage it is far from clear that it was beyond repair.

It had the misfortune to be sited on a major intersection of the one way system and we all know that free movement of cars must be put ahead of buildings. There was absolutely no question of people being in the building and thorough shoring up should have ensured public safety.

There is some sort of process for group 1 & 2 listed buildings, plus NZHPT registered buildings – a cursory sort of report by the heritage planners (they are so overwhelmed that the reports are completely perfunctory) – and a report from the NZHPT and/or council engineer, but the Civil Defence Controller has the final say.

I am not sure that NZHPT is fighting too hard anyway from what I can gather – because people have been killed (mainly in modern buildings) they seem to have taken the view that they can’t push hard for heritage.

If the owner can be identified (not always easy) they might be given 24 hours notice so have a chance to argue for a delay. If buildings are unlisted and simply make an important contribution to the character of a precinct, no process is required at all. Nothing at all can be done to try and avert demolition.

There seems to have been some agreement made between Civil Defence and the council staff involved with Civil Defence, that no cordons to protect the public from buildings needing repair will be put in place if they would encroach into a road – as long as they take that view not much will be saved.

As a result of tonight’s meeting a delegation of heritage advocates and business people are going to try and meet the Civil Defence Controller tomorrow to urge a slow down, but whether they will even be granted an appointment is far from certain.

We are meeting again on Friday to plan our next steps, especially if the appeal to the Controller fails to have any impact. The scary thing is the Government can just keep on extending the state of emergency.

{Letter received by What if? on Tuesday, 8 March 2011 11.24pm. Names removed to protect identities. -Eds}

(9.00am) What if? learned the group has been granted a meeting today with the Civil Defence Controller.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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SAVE Dragon Café / Barron Building – Sign the Online Petition

175 Rattray Street, Dunedin, New Zealand

Please support the retention and restoration of Dunedin’s iconic Dragon Café / Barron Building by signing the online petition at this link:

http://www.gopetition.com/petition/42203.html

A paper petition is currently being prepared for circulation.

From an earlier post, following a recent site visit to “the first and second floor interiors of the Barron and Co building . . . The [architect] Owen Macfie interiors are still in existence and although in some places in poor condition are for the most part unaltered and therefore pretty special”.

Photo: Paul Le Comte (January 2011)

Photo: JW Allen, Barron Building c. 1880
Hocken Collections [c/n F405/16]

Related Posts, Comments and Photographs:
13.1.11 Barron Building and Rattray Street
13.1.11 Banks, Barron & Co Building Collapse pics
12.1.11 Demo by neglect? Save the facade?

Latest Update 22.1.11 Dunedin Heritage Fund

Photo: Elizabeth Kerr (January 2011)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Hotel tower: developer “flashpoints” and the elusive mix of activities

### nzherald.co.nz 5:30 AM Saturday Oct 2, 2010
Is Auckland’s ‘urban village’ ideal straying off course?
By Geoff Cumming
How you see the restoration of a collection of century-old buildings on Auckland’s downtown waterfront is a matter of perspective. From one angle, the Britomart heritage precinct is the best thing to happen on the waterfront in a generation or three – cocking a snook at property hard-heads who argued that the 18 largely derelict buildings were beyond a bankable future. From another, it is a public-private partnership where the balance appears to be tilting towards the developer; where the promised “people-friendly” benefits of this urban revitalisation are crumbling.
The immediate flashpoint is the private plan change allowing the developers to build a high rise luxury hotel on the sailors’ home/Schooner Tavern site on Quay St. That decision has split architectural and urban design critics, some maintaining that new high rise can be successfully blended with low-rise heritage buildings. If so, it will be a first for Auckland.
Read more
(link via Richard Walls)

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### http://www.stuff.co.nz Last updated 05:00 02/10/2010
Demolition likely of four heritage sites
By Glenn Conway – The Press
The fate of six earthquake-damaged Christchurch heritage buildings will be decided by city councillors on Monday, with staff saying four are too expensive to repair.

Those under threat include Manchester Courts in Manchester St, the former Nurse Maude Association building in Madras St and two Sydenham retail properties in Colombo St.

Two others – the Ohinetahi property of architect Sir Miles Warren at Governors Bay and a former shoe-polish factory in Ferry Rd – have been recommended for full or partial restoration.

Detailed reports and heritage assessments on all six buildings will be debated at an extraordinary meeting of the council starting at 9.30am on Monday. It is expected to be the final meeting of the current council, with local body elections next Saturday.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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D Scene features heritage/issues!

### D Scene 24-3-10 (front cover)
Car boot sale
A developer has chosen a novel way to make his point over [a] resource consent charge, and is selling his car to meet fees incurred restoring his Crawford St building. See p3. #bookmark

Possible closure strikes a chord (page 2)
By Mike Houahan
Once upon a time, in a galaxy far, far away, I earned a living writing about and reviewing rock ’n’ roll bands. Hence, the news that venerable Dunedin venue Sammy’s is on the brink of closure unless it is rapidly brought up to scratch to meet fire regulations struck a chord… Rock ’n’ roll has almost always been shunted into back-alley venues not fit for purpose, and venues and band managers have often colluded to stuff as many punters in as possible to maximise their revenue.
{continues} #bookmark

Fuming over charges (page 3)
By Wilma McCorkindale
Dunedin City Council may have another zoning battle on its hands, with building co-owner Lawrie Forbes fuming over consent charges for a redevelopment in moribund Crawford St. DCC zoned blocks from Queens Garden to the Oval large-scale retail in 1995, but Forbes believes the zone is not viable and has called for the council to review it.

Forbes said he and partner Craig McNaughton were restoring two of the four buildings on the site at present. Heritage values that had been lost over the century were being restored.

{continues} #bookmark

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The following headline should not imply the building proposal has been granted resource consent. The application has yet to be notified.

Ex-gallery revamp approved (page 5)
By Wilma McCorkindale
One end of the old art gallery building at Logan Park is up for demolition – part of a $5m Dunedin City Council spend up at Logan Park…the last of the buildings which housed the [New Zealand and South Seas International Exhibition (1925-1926)] still in public ownership, is to lose some of its southern end to accommodate an extension to the University Oval sports ground.

‘[Paul]Hudson conceded council intially considered levelling the entire former art gallery as it grappled with the high cost* of the work required to retain it.’

{continues} #bookmark

*That was just ‘historical’ airyfairy bullshit from council on the cost of building retention.

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Bus tourists ‘not welcome’ (page 6)
By Wilma McCorkindale
City hotelier Peter Laing is questioning the city’s attitude towards bus tourists, after he recently paid a parking ticket slapped on a tour bus dropping tourists outside his hotel. Laing said the bus had no option but to park on one of two P5 zones the Dunedin City Council had erected outside the hotel…[he] claimed the new P5s were a remnant of the council’s u-turn on unpopular parking changes it introduced last year.
{continues} #bookmark

Register to read D Scene online at http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

User-pays system a ‘farce’ (page 8)
By Wilma McCorkindale
A Dunedin landlord is peeved at Dunedin City Council’s rules on rating of rental properties, saying its user-pays system was a farce. Darryl Jones was angry over an anomaly he identified between the rating method of his aging block of flats in Stuart St and on studio unit complexes in the city.
{continues} #bookmark

Talk: Dunedin on Dunedin
Your say: Letters to the Editor (page 9)
It didn’t happen overnight, by K Nordal Stene, North East Valley
The shocking state of Sammy’s, which necessitated ats immediate closure, has been a shock as well as a disappointment to many.
{continues} #bookmark

“The Building Act and the Fire Service Act place the obligation on the building owner to operate the building safely.”
-Trevor Tilyard, Dunedin Fire Service

Read the deputy chief fire officer’s full reply.

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The Invisible City (pages 11-12)
By Gavin Bertram
Ancient cities like London, Paris and Rome have layers of history beneath them. These hidden strata tell the story of their habitation by humans, of the rise and fall of empires, and of inexorable progress. Unlike those great metropolises, subterranean Dunedin can’t claim layers going back to Roman times and beyond. But what’s buried under the city is still a source of fascination, and a great window into its history.
{continues} #bookmark #bookmark

Biz: Crunching the numbers (page 20)
Starting it up
Upstart Business Incubator is in the business of getting people into business, but it also has to pay its own way. Mike Houlahan reports.
From its Princes St premises, Upstart has nine companies in “incubation” with five in pre-incubation – a process of readying firms for the full programme of mentoring and business assistance, which becomes available to fledgling entrepreneurs when they graduate to the incubator.
{continues} #bookmark

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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