Tag Archives: Brand

Dunedin mainstreet amenity upgrades #vibrancy #senseofplace

THE COUNCIL DOES ITS BIT | Facade revamp for George Street mall

Background (unrest)….

ODT 15.10.15 Cr Hilary Calvert p14ODT 15.10.15 (page 14)

http://www.odt.co.nz/news/dunedin/368171/dcc-staff-member-quits-cv-queried

Then….

Civic Move 1 [building programme/ profile]
walls-now-cull-corridor-new-29-12-15 Douglas Field

Civic Move 2 [street glam/ bringing people back ?!]
cull corridor night. stars Douglas Field.gif

*Images: Douglas Field Dec 2015

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Lexus UK latest design videos #cars #takumi

HAIL y’ballers on a budget bitches [greenie-cyclists @ #DUD]
Ain’t no down economy.

Lexus UK Published on Dec 21, 2015
Lexus on Ice: NX Ice Wheels
The Lexus hallmarks of expert design, sublime style, and supreme craftsmanship have driven their ethos of Creating Amazing for years, both in their production vehicles and their concepts. For Lexus’s latest project, they put a team master craftsmen to the test as they tackled their coolest concept yet: the ice-tyre Lexus NX. Driving on four perfectly-finished, hand-sculpted tyres made from optically perfect, crystal-clear ice, the Lexus NX emerged from its own test of craftsmanship and quality – a five-day deep freeze at -30 degrees Centigrade that left it clad in a thick layer of ice.

Taking three months from start to finish, the ice-tyre Lexus NX is the product of a collaboration between Lexus UK and the ice-sculpting experts at Hamilton Ice Sculptors. The challenge was two-fold: how to recreate the Lexus five-twin-spoke alloy wheel and its Yokohama winter tyre with incredible precision, while also making a wheel and tyre that would support the NX’s 2.2-tonne mass. Like the highly-trained Lexus ‘takumi’, Hamilton Ice Sculptors combine generations of experience using traditional ice-sculpting methods with the latest technology to design and produce their works of art. Employing advanced techniques like laser-scanning, three-dimensional computer-aided design (CAD), and multi-axis machining equipment, they could produce consistent wheel and tyre combinations ready for hand-finishing with traditional tools and techniques.

With the ice tyres ready and the NX suitably chilled in its icy chamber, the moment of truth saw the wheels and ice tyres mounted onto the frozen Lexus hybrid (which started first time, of course) ready for its first attempt at driving on ice. Part engineering, part art, this unique project came together to prove that anything is possible with the right combination of desire, skill and dedication.

While tires made entirely from ice may not get the best traction, they certainly look cool. To start, the car’s actual wheels were laser-scanned to ensure the rolling ice sculptures were a perfect match for the vehicle. After the wheels were set in place, the NX sat in -22°F conditions for five days before it was finally unveiled. The ultimate test drive is far from the high speed, closed-course stunts you usually see in car commercials, but given that the NX has a curb weight of about 4000 pounds, the journey is plenty impressive on its own. (The glowing blue back lights are also a nice touch.) You can watch the full process in the video above. [msn motoring]

Lexus UK Published on Oct 5, 2015
Lexus – Making the Origami Inspired Car
There’s never been a Lexus quite like it: sheet metal, glass and plastics have been set aside for the creation of a one-off, life-sized recreation of the Lexus IS…. Crafted in precision-cut card. Pushing the boundaries of design, technology and craftsmanship, this driveable, full-sized sculpture explores Lexus’s promise of Creating Amazing. Comprised of some 1700 individually shaped pieces of cardboard, this origami-inspired car is a faithful replica of the Lexus IS saloon, and is produced as a celebration of the human craftsmanship skills that go into every car Lexus makes. Many thanks to NVDK, a design and production agency, providing services for the industries of art, design and architecture, from concept right through to final production. NVDK specialises in digital craftsmanship, mixing cutting edge digital technologies with artisanal skills and traditions to achieve forward-looking results.

Learn more at: http://www.lexus.co.uk/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LexusUK/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/OfficialLexusUK
Instagram: https://instagram.com/officialLexusUK/

Website: http://www.nvdk.co.uk

Lexus UK Published on Apr 24, 2015
How to fold an origami cat with your non-dominant hand
The people that work at Lexus’ factories aren’t just employees. They’re craftsmen and women that take considerable pride in the standard of their work. But not all Lexus craftsmen are equal. At the top of the tree are artisans known as ‘takumi’. Their goal is simple – the pursuit of perfection in their chosen field, whether it be paintwork or welding, vehicle dynamics or interior crafting. They are responsible for keeping up the high standards Lexus demands of its vehicles. Becoming a takumi is no easy task. All takumi have at least a quarter of a century of experience, time spent honing their skills to a fine point. Several takumi have had their skills digitised and programmed into robots that recreate actions repeated thousands of times, so it’s vital that they’re up to scratch. Before becoming a takumi, candidates are assessed in a number of ways, but one is via a decidedly non-digital method – the Japanese art of paper folding, origami. Before they graduate to takumi status, candidates are challenged to fold a relatively simple origami cat. But here’s the catch – they have to fold the cat with just one hand, and in under 90 seconds. Oh, and it has to be their non-dominant hand. Challenging? To find out, we went to see Mark Bolitho. A respected name in the world of origami, Mark works full time creating paper masterworks for corporate clients, advertising and events, and is also the author of several books on the art. In short, he knows what he’s doing when it comes to folding paper.

Lexus UK Published on Oct 5, 2015
Lexus – The Origami Inspired Car Revealed

Lexus UK Published on Oct 8, 2015
Kevin McCloud drives Lexus Origami Car at Grand Designs Live 2015
Design guru Kevin McCloud launched the 10th anniversary of Grand Designs Live today by driving a unique, origami-inspired Lexus into the show at the National Exhibition Centre, Birmingham. The car is a life-size replica of the new Lexus IS saloon, created from 1,700 fully recyclable laser-cut cardboard sheets, capturing every design detail, inside and out. It has been commissioned by Lexus as a celebration of the human craftsmanship skills of the takumi, the men and women who work on the company’s production lines in Japan.

Lexus UK Published on Jun 29, 2015
How to draw a car – designing the Lexus LF-SA
Lexus’ striking design has always been a fundamental part of its appeal – it’s what sets it apart from other premium marques. And there’s no better way of getting a deeper understanding of how Lexus is designing for the future than by watching the process from start to finish. This video goes behind the scenes at ED², Lexus top secret design studio in the south of France, to show you how to draw a car.

UK Lexus Published on Apr 21, 2015
Lexus at Milan Design Week 2015
A closer look at Lexus, A Journey of the Senses at Milan Design Week 2015.

Learn more at: http://www.lexus.co.uk/

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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D Scene – No new #DunedinSlogan

CRIKEY

We like Dunedin’s self-deprecatory humour. Not to be defeated, the new #DunedinSlogans campaign – why have just one – will be mounted by the united citizens of Dunedin. We will make the T-shirts! Shame on our father figures for piking out. See D Scene’s page 7: a cautionary tale that is almost certainly to be about what to do in an emergency, or when the Civic Centre floods and loses *power*. Was there something about a marketing and communications plan…

### D Scene 2-6-10
They’re building our stadium right here (page 1)
Dunedin building firms are dismayed after an Auckland company beat them to the punch for a stadium carpentry contract. See page 3.
#bookmark

Register to read D Scene online at http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

City workers promised jobs (page 3)
By Wilma McCorkindale
An Auckland company has won the carpentry contract on the Forsyth Barr (Otago) Stadium, but is promising Dunedin workers jobs. In a decision last week, a joint carpentry tender put by local companies ABL (Amalgamated Builders Ltd) Lund Construction, was dumped in favour of Auckland company Wallace Construction.
The decision had made things difficult for the ABL-Lund joint venture. About 30 local workers would have been employed on the stadium carpentry teams.
{continues} #bookmark

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Rail contract battle not over says MP (page 3)
By Mike Houlahan
Dunedin South Labour MP Clare Curran says the battle to convince KiwiRail to build new carriages for Auckland’s rail system at its Hillside and Woburn workshops is not over.
Curran yesterday repeated her call for an independent assessment of the capacity at Hillside and Wellington’s Woburn workshop.
A rally in support of Hillside and its workers will be held next Tuesday. A march will start from the Dental School at 11.30am, and will be followed by speeches in the Octagon.
{continues} #bookmark

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Council dumps idea for new slogan (page 7)
By Wilma McCorkindale
Dunedin embarked on a slogan-seeking exercise in January. So, where the bloody hell is it?
City marketing and communications agency manager Debra Simes declined to comment whether a slogan would remain as part of the new brand, but said her team was in the throes of finalising its marketing and communications plan.
{continues} #bookmark

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Talk: Dunedin on Dunedin (page 8)
Your say: Letters to the editor
I can see clearly now by Lyndon Weggery, Dunedin
My thanks to Jimmy Jones (D Scene 26/5/10) for making it crystal clear that the latest so-called consultation exercise on South Dunedin Retail strategy is nothing more than a Parking Section smokescreen to do away with limited free-time parking in King Edward St.
{continues} #bookmark

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A building of memories (pages 9-10)
By Mike Houlahan
Dunedin Gasworks Museum has won a race against time to restore another building at the industrial heritage complex. The fitting shop at the Dunedin Gasworks has led a charmed liife. Now it is almost fully restored.
Dunedin City Council this week agreed to fund a $345,000 shortfall for restoration work on the Gasworks’ fitting shop.
The Dunedin Gasworks Museum is open every first and third Sunday of the month from midday until 4pm, and every Tuesday from midday until 4pm.
{continues} #bookmark #bookmark

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Dunedin TV has plenty to celebrate (page 11)
By Wilma McCorkindale
DNTV2 made its first broadcast on July 31, 1962 – its half century anniversary is still two years away … Telvision New Zealand’s last Dunedin station manager, Russell Garbutt, said no matter which way one measures it, Dunedin was one of the most productive television regions in the country.
{continues} #bookmark

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Superficial Dunedin sloganism

NO SLOGAN REQUIRED

We see ODT is voicing its campaign using the word “brand”, despite taking the front page today to push slogans mostly. Hmmph.

The slogan search was a bit of fun but comes at the cost of exposing the negative self-deprecatory ‘irishness’ of the place.

More than that, helpfully, it shows some of the wider demographics of people’s exposure to what Dunedin might seem like during a dull, chilly summer, or what their memories are of the city having the hit the wider world in adulthood. Some childishness enters the fray of sloganism.

Users of the internet demonstrate how widely the debate is cast, and how lively the medium is for brainstorming, discussion and famous last words – in which Dunedin comes to resemble hapless prey, underscored by truths, comparisons and denials of sorts.

One thing is clear from the battery charge of slogans online, in particular (!!!!), Dunedin is sufficiently well regarded as ‘being’ its own place – otherwise, it would have attracted little or no comment at all.

Dunedin always has something to do with learning, leaving and the test of arriving with little known, until you get past the glint in its eye.

Cloyingly, in business it appears to have lots to do with OBHS. There’s room to explore the city’s identity through other mirrors and charms, make that soon, make that comprehensive.

For these days in the news we’re saying we’re debt funded here to an unholy degree. We are for this matter on watch to emerge, we hope, without deep scars, parochial chips on shoulders – divorced from our good side.

****

### ODT Online Thu, 14 Jan 2010
City brand search hots up
By David Loughrey
Dunedin’s plan to develop and launch a new brand for the city has sparked a strong city-wide response, and the search is now on to find the “essence” of the Dunedin experience to promote the city to the rest of the world.
Read more

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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