Tag Archives: Beijing

Helen Clark’s statement on International Women’s Day 8.3.15

Helen Clark [intheblack.com] [InTheBlack.com]

Helen Elizabeth Clark, ONZ SSI (born 26.2.50) became the Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme in April 2009, and is the first woman to lead the organization. She is also the Chair of the United Nations Development Group, a committee consisting of the heads of all UN funds, programmes and departments working on development issues. Prior to her appointment with UNDP, Helen Clark served for nine years as the 37th Prime Minister of New Zealand (1999 – 2008). Throughout her tenure as Prime Minister, Helen Clark engaged widely in policy development and advocacy across the international, economic, social and cultural spheres. >> More

Helen Clark: Statement on International Women’s Day
New York, New York

8 March 2015

This week, the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women will commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, which remains the world’s best blueprint for achieving gender equality and empowering women. The review of this visionary roadmap, adopted at the Fourth World Conference for Women in 1995, is an opportunity to celebrate the world’s progress toward ensuring the rights and opportunities of women and girls, and also to renew and reinvigorate commitments to achieve gender equality.

One of the great achievements of the Beijing Platform for Action was the clear recognition that women’s rights are human rights. Since that historic gathering in Beijing, when 17,000 participants and 30,000 activists gathered to voice and demonstrate their support for gender equality and women’s empowerment, there has been increasing recognition that gender equality, in addition to being a human right, is also critical to making development progress. If women and girls are not able to fully realize their rights and aspirations in all spheres of life, development will be impeded.

Twenty years on, we can see both progress and challenges in the twelve areas of critical concern laid out in the Beijing Platform for Action. Gender parity in primary education has been achieved, but completion rates and the quality of education are not high across all countries. More women have been elected to public office – about 21% of the world’s parliamentarians are women, up from about 11% in 1995 – but we are still far from parity. More women than ever before are participating in the work force, but women generally earn less than men and, in rich and poor countries alike, carry a disproportionate burden of unpaid care work which deprives them of time for valuable pursuits like earning money, gaining new skills, and participating in public life. And, while more laws exist to protect women from violence, sexual and gender-based violence continue to occur on every continent and in every country, often reaching horrific levels where there is war and conflict.

Fortunately, there is encouraging momentum not only to renew the promises of Beijing, but to address issues which were not in the spotlight in 1995, such as the need to ensure women’s participation in responding to climate change, building peace and security, and helping their countries recover from crises. These issues are central to UNDP’s efforts to help partner countries build resilience to sustain development results. By promoting gender equality and empowering women as agents of change and leaders in the development processes which shape their lives, UNDP envisages a more inclusive, sustainable, and resilient world.

Today is International Women’s Day, which this year is devoted to the theme, “Empower Women, Empower Humanity – Picture It!” Join me in supporting this call to fulfill the promises made in Beijing 20 years ago, and to realize a world in which every woman and girl has the opportunity to fulfill her potential and enjoy equal rights and status.

[ends] Link

Leadership Strategy Business
█ Interview by InTheBlack.com (1.2.14): Helen Clark is UN-daunted by the need to change

█ Follow Helen Clark on Twitter @HelenClarkUNDP

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Pollution in Chinese cities

China pollution dnews-files-2013 [ddmcdn.com]City pollution [ddmcdn.com]

### stuff.co.nz Last updated 12:20, March 7 2015
Film highlighting pollution woes vanishes from China’s Internet
By Dian Zhang
A 104-minute film lecture that outlines the serious pollution in China has been removed from the nation’s internet, after receiving millions of views and raising hopes that the country’s leadership might tackle China’s widespread smog problem. The film – by Chai Jing, one of the best-known journalists in China and a well-known former state television reporter – was released right before China’s two most important political events, the National People’s Congress and the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference. Before the movie was censored, a story from Xinhua News Agency, China’s official press agency, praising the film was deleted online the same night the article was posted, offering a hint of the government’s real attitude.

Released last Saturday, Under the Dome had received 42.9 million views on Youku, a video-sharing website like YouTube, by 5 pm Thursday (local time). It prompted 530,460 posts on Weibo.

In the film, Chai gives a speech and shows data and interviews with government officials and environmental experts from China and abroad. The film shows striking images of the extent of air pollution in a number of Chinese cities, as well as rivers fouled by chemicals and littered with flotsam and dead fish. Chai also travelled to Los Angeles and London to gauge their experiences dealing with smog.
Read more

█ Chai Jing’s documentary is well worth watching. Preamble via CNN.

CNN Published on Mar 3, 2015
China smog documentary goes viral
Director of China Environment Forum Jennifer Turner discusses a new documentary titled “Under the Dome” that discusses pollution in China.

Linghein Ho Published on Mar 1, 2015
Chai Jing’s review: Under the Dome – Investigating China’s Smog 柴静雾霾调查:穹顶之下 (full translation)
ENGLISH SUBTITLES ARE FULLY TRANSLATED
For more information: http://www.linghein.me/tr_u/
English Subtitles: FULLY UPDATED | Japanese Subtitles: update to 09:25 | French Subtitles: update to 31:06
Former celebrity TV anchor Chai Jing quit her job after her baby daughter was born with a lung tumor, and after a year of rigorous investigation, launched this 1 hour 40 minute documentary about China’s smog: what is smog? Where does it come from? What do we do from here? It is very powerful in many ways. English subtitles are now completely finished, and other languages are being added.
Music: “Brotherhood” by John Dreamer (Google Play • iTunes)

[click to enlarge]
18kx19av6svsagif3 photo comparatives (*gif) taken by NASA’s Aqua satellite via gizmodo.com

Related Post and Comments:
23.3.13 Chongqing, Southwest China

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Christchurch: HOTELS with Chinese investment pending

A major Chinese construction company is eyeing joint-venture prospects in Christchurch.

PrimeTV News China 2 12-4-13PrimeTV News China 1 12-4-13

### stuff.co.nz Last updated 11:33 12/04/2013
Chinese ‘very interested’ in key Christchurch project
By Lois Cairns – The Press
Christchurch Mayor Bob Parker, who is in China visiting Christchurch’s sister cities, met representatives from Beijing-based company Huadu Construction this week and says they are interested in being part of a major development planned for Christchurch.

Parker said he could not reveal details of the development at this stage as negotiations were still under way, but it would be a significant project for the city.

Earthquake-recovery officials have been overseas previously seeking expressions of interest in key projects for Christchurch’s rebuild, including the new convention centre.

Asked about the possible scale of investment, Key said “the sky’s the limit” for some of the groups they were in talks with, some of which were experienced in PPP investment.

Prime Minister John Key said the business delegation he was leading in China this week had met groups interested in investing in construction, such as building hotels, where New Zealand had long accepted foreign investment. Christchurch could form part of these discussions.
Read more

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Starplus Homes staff ‘in the dark’
Some Hamilton tradespeople and contractors are understood to be owed hundreds of thousands of dollars by Chinese building company Starplus Homes. Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Images: PrimeTV News 12.4.13 [screenshots]

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Utopia at Dunedin Public Art Gallery

Amazing! Catch RMB City: A Second Life City Planning by China Tracy 2007-09, and other ‘urban’ works in the Utopia exhibition.

The large single channel video projection at the Art Gallery holds the superb detail and layering of Cao Fei’s 3D animation. Watch how the Birds Nest stadium and other architectural icons play out in the frenetic assemblage of the ‘live’ city.

“RMB City will be the condensed incarnation of contemporary Chinese cities with most of their characteristics; a series of new Chinese fantasy realms that are highly self-contradictory, inter-permeative, laden with irony and suspicion, and extremely entertaining and pan-political.”
-Artist statement

From Dunedin Public Art Gallery publicity:
RMB City was created by Cao Fei’s online identity China Tracy (with her platinum hair and suit of armour) on the Creative Commons Island of Kula. Named after Chinese money, RMB City shows a perverse view of Beijing—a blend of communism, socialism, and capitalism. Like Beijing itself, it is constantly under construction, candy-striped smoke stacks suggest continuous industrial production and ships move goods swiftly in and out of port. A giant shopping cart, filled with skyscrapers and religious monuments, floats nearby; and Tiananmen Square has been converted into a swimming pool.

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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Whatever happened to the Bird’s Nest?

Some call the $450-million ‘Bird’s Nest’, built for the Olympics, a white elephant. Over the winter, management hoped to generate revenue with a snow park, but attendance has been sparse.

### latimes.com February 15, 2010
Beijing’s National Stadium is on thin ice
By Lily Kuo – Beijing
Beijing is hosting its own version of the Winter Olympics. Inside the architectural wonder of the capital’s National Stadium, children on rubber doughnuts race on the snow. Teenagers and adults slide slowly down a low ski slope. In the background, a band plays ’90s Chinese rock on a stage flanked by fake snow peaks.

The snow park is the latest effort to create a new life for the stadium, known as the Bird’s Nest.

The “Happy Snow and Ice Season” will run all winter at the stadium where Chinese directors staged a stunning opening ceremony for the 2008 Summer Olympic Games and Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt set world records. Now slushy mounds of machine-made snow and a single ski slope occupy the grounds.

The Bird’s Nest is expensive. Tickets to the snow park are $26. Then visitors use a swipe card to rack up charges for rentals, games and food. They pay at the end.

“I don’t know how much we’ve paid today. It could be as much as my month’s salary,” said Ma Tianjun.

Ma, who drove an hour to get to the park, said he realised too late how expensive it would be. “Once you board the thieves’ ship, you can only go forward,” he said, using an old Beijing saying.

Read more

Related posts:
1.3.09 But, real stadium architecture… + Bird’s Nest Video (1of5)
2.3.09 Bird’s Nest videos continued

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Q: How tall is the stadium?

A: Thinking taller than Otago House? Look it up for yourselves, people. We discussed the height earlier at What if? As Stu mentioned, the crawler cranes provide a clue.

The stadium will be a lot taller than most of you think, in contrast to everything else around it – except the quarry.

You know the nice view you get from your house in Waverley over to Water of Leith and Leith Boat Harbour? That will be completely, utterly, dramatically CHANGED when the stadium gets capped. There’s a university word.

Which brings me to the proposed design of University of Otago’s new building on University Plaza. Architects Warren and Mahoney have produced a really interesting design concept, in visual, material and experiential terms. We look forward to public release of the graphics.

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A world away, there are much taller things than the stadium to think about.
Has gardens, reads like a stack of salad plates.

### Dezeen December 10th, 2009 at 12:54 am
Urban Forest by MAD
By Natasha Lyons
Beijing architects MAD have designed a skyscraper for Chongqing, China, with gardens at each level. Rather than consider the project vertically, the architects envisage a stack of floors, each slice shifted horizontally to create spaces for gardens and patios. The 385 metre-high building will be called Urban Forest.

In October 2009, The Urban Forest from MAD debuted in the Heart-Made, Europalia exhibition at the 2009 Europalia China. It represents the most challenging dream of the contemporary Chinese architecture — a type of urban landmark that rises from the affection for nature. It is no longer a static icon but an organic form that changes all the time with people’s perception.

Read more + Images

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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Bird's Nest videos continued

Discovery Channel – chinasuperpower
China Beijing Olympic National Stadium – Bird’s Nest (2of5)
June 11, 2008 (9’07”)

Vodpod videos no longer available.

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China Beijing Olympic National Stadium – Bird’s Nest (3of5) (9’06”)

China Beijing Olympic National Stadium – Bird’s Nest (4of5) (9’07”)

China Beijing Olympic National Stadium – Part 5 of 5 (9’04”)

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The Beijing National Stadium (traditional Chinese: 北京國家體育場; simplified Chinese: 北京国家体育场; Hanyu Pinyin: Běijīng Guójiā Tǐyùchǎng; Tongyong Pinyin: Běijīng Guójiā Tǐyùchǎng), also known as the National Stadium,[1] or the “Bird’s Nest” (鳥巢) for its architecture, is a stadium finished for the Olympic Green in Beijing, China that has so far been completed as of March 2008.[2] The stadium will host the main track and field competitions for the 2008 Summer Olympics, as well as the opening and closing ceremonies. It is located east of the Beijing National Aquatics Centre.In 2002, Government officials engaged architects worldwide in a design competition. Pritzker Prize-winning architects Herzog & de Meuron collaborated with ArupSport and China Architecture Design & Research Group to win the competition. Contemporary Chinese artist, Ai Weiwei, is the Artistic Consultant for design.[3] The ground was broken on Christmas Eve December 2003, and construction started in March 2004, but was halted by the high construction cost in August 2004 and continued again. In January 2008, concerns about construction working conditions arose when it was revealed that 2 workers had died during the stadium’s construction.The stadium can seat as many as 91,000 spectators during the Olympics. The capacity will then be reduced to 80,000 after the Games. It has replaced the original intended venue of the Guangdong Olympic Stadium[citation needed]. The stadium is 330 metres long by 220 metres wide, and is 69.2 metres tall. The stadium uses 258,000 square metres of space and has a usable area of 204,000 square metres. It was built with 36 km of unwrapped steel[citation needed], with a combined weight of 45,000 tonnes. The stadium has some 11,000 square metres of underground rooms with waterproof walls. The stadium will cost up to 3.5 billion yuan (≈423 million USD).

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