Tag Archives: Awards

Mosgiel (2015): Destroyed community beautification project —a development

Received.
Thu, 29 Oct 2015 at 2:27 p.m.

█ Message: The community board had a choice (2007) of which side of the road the footpath should go; and they chose to destroy the railway beautification project. Please note who the primary mover was. None other than Lester Harvey who received awards and whatever else for the beautification project. Surely he would’ve been the prime mover for the footpath to have been on the other side of the road (??), to preserve the beautification project that he claimed as his own.

AGENDA FOR A MEETING OF THE MOSGIEL TAIERI COMMUNITY BOARD TO BE HELD IN THE DOWNES ROOM, MOSGIEL SERVICE CENTRE ON WEDNESDAY, 27 NOVEMBER 1999, COMMENCING AT 4.00 PM – ma_mtcb_m_2007_09_19.pdf

http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0012/13053/ma_mtcb_m_2007_09_19.pdf

Item 7. of the agenda makes interesting reading.

MTCB Minutes 27.11.99 (19.9.11) Item 7

Gladstone Road 1aOtago 150th Anniversary plantings scraped away at Gladstone Road

Related Posts and Comments:
26.3.15 DESTROYED, beautification project —two totally different stories
20.3.15 DESTROYED, beautification project —Railway corridor, Gladstone Road

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image supplied.

2 Comments

Filed under Business, DCC, Democracy, Design, Hot air, Name, New Zealand, OAG, Ombudsman, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Tourism, Town planning, Urban design

Significant tree: 28 Argyle Street Mosgiel – LUC-2015-296

As a community board member and a businessman-resident, Martin Dillon, it seems, has set a precedent for removal of (District Plan listed) Significant Trees from the streets of Mosgiel township. Not only this, his community board supports the destruction of many community-established trees at Mosgiel’s Memorial Gardens – to make way for a new swimming pool complex. Earlier this year the community board was ultimately responsible for destruction of the community’s beautification scheme at Gladstone Road (railway corridor).
That’s one hell of a lot of greenery you’ve seen wiped off the planet, Mr Dillon.
SHAME ON YOU

ANOTHER APPLICATION FOR REMOVAL – A COPPER BEECH THIS TIME
The tree is prettier than the freaking house beside it.

28 Argyle Street Mosgiel - LUC-2015-296 (significant tree) 3aSignificant tree – 28 Argyle Street Mosgiel – LUC-2015-296
Closes: 28/08/2015

Notification of Application for a Resource Consent – Under Section 93(2) of the Resource Management Act 1991.
The Dunedin City Council has received the following application for Resource Consent:

Application description
To remove a tree that is listed in the Dunedin City District Plan under Schedule 25.3 as T151 (Copper Beech).

Application documents
LUC-2015-296 – Public notice (PDF, 34.6 KB)
This document is the Public Notice for Resource Consent application LUC-2015-296

LUC-2015-296 – Submission 13 form (PDF, 78.2 KB)
This document can be used to make a submission regarding Resource Consent application LUC-2015-296

LUC-2015-296 – Application (PDF, 530.0 KB)
This document is a scanned copy of the application for resource consent LUC-2015-296

Notified resource consent details
Closing date: 28/08/2015
Consent number: Significant tree – 28 Argyle Street Mosgiel – LUC-2015-296

Name of applicant: M J Sproule & J A Maxwell

Location of site: 28 Argyle Street, Mosgiel, being that land legally described as Lot 3 Deposited Plan, 470637 held in Computer Freehold Register 636380

Address for service: M J Sproule & J A Maxwell, 34A Ayr Street, Mosgiel 9024

Online submissions: Online submission form

http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/council-online/notified-resource-consents/current-consultation/significant-tree-28-argyle-street-Mosgiel

LUC-2015-296 [excerpts from application]

28 Argyle Street Mosgiel - LUC-2015-296 (significant tree)

28 Argyle Street Mosgiel - LUC-2015-296 (significant tree) 1

DCC on Significant Trees
Dunedin City District Plan — Schedule 25.3 Significant Trees (PDF, 275.6 KB)

Related Posts and Comments:
24.7.15 Hands off Mosgiel Memorial Gardens
20.3.15 DESTROYED, beautification project —Railway corridor, Gladstone Road
14.12.14 Significant Tree: 23 Church St, Mosgiel [Applicant: M L & M C Dillon]
15.5.14 Significant Tree: 28A Heriot Row
22.2.13 DCC: Significant Trees

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

3 Comments

Filed under Business, Construction, DCC, Democracy, Design, Economics, Heritage, Name, New Zealand, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, Urban design

DESTROYED, beautification project —two totally different stories

Taieri Herald 6.5.97 (page 6) – Re: Gladstone Road railway corridor, Mosgiel
Taieri Herald 6.5.97 (page 6) Railway Beautification036 (1)[click to enlarge]

****

### dunedintv.co.nz March 26, 2015 – 7:01pm
Nightly interview: Lester Harvey
The removal of plants and shrubs from the Gladstone Road railway corridor has angered some Mosgiel residents. Lester Harvey has spent years co-ordinating beautification efforts in the area, and hopes a meeting with KiwiRail will lead to a positive outcome.
Video

█ What if? fathoms that some strong politics care of DCC/ex-DCC/Community Board/KiwiRail is putting Lester Harvey in the spotlight. Not terribly nice being fall guy for the under-table politicians involved.

Gladstone Road 1aGladstone Rd railway corridor project plaqueGladstone Road, Mosgiel – minus Community plantings/beautification project.
Photos: Brian Miller

Related Post and Comments:
20.3.15 DESTROYED, beautification project —Railway corridor, Gladstone Road

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

6 Comments

Filed under Business, Construction, Cycle network, DCC, Democracy, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, KiwiRail, Media, Name, ORC, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, Urban design

DESTROYED, beautification project —Railway corridor, Gladstone Road

Updated post Sat, 21 Mar 2015 at 11:55 p.m.
Brian Miller makes further comment, see below. More photographs.

Received from Brian Miller
Fri, 20 Mar 2015 at 4:29 p.m.

VANDALISM —Nothing else goes near describing what is in this photo.
Let me start from the start.

Gladstone Road 1aOtago 150th Anniversary plantings scraped away at Gladstone Rd.

1997
As a Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board member I accepted the challenge of beautifying the railway corridor from Wingatui to Riccarton Road along a four-kilometre length of Gladstone Road. No other board member wanted anything to do with it, until I had it organised ready to go. They said. “It couldn’t be done.” Just the incentive I needed.

I had to make sure that all the boxes were ticked, before Tranz Rail would let the project begin. With that done, Board members fell over themselves to get involved.

Thousands of hours of voluntary labour went into the project. Alex Griffin and his Taskforce Green did most of the hard work. The local community donated the use of trucks and other equipment, while Lester Harvey ferreted out the thousands of shrubs. We turned what was an eyesore entry into Mosgiel into what it is today. A more welcoming entry. Unfortunately, the story does not end there.

As I said earlier we met all Tranz Rail’s requirements when we did our planting.

Just imagine how I felt this morning when I travelled along the section from Riccarton Road towards the industrial area, and the destruction of the thousands of hours of voluntary labour and gifted plants that had been ripped out. Total destruction of this section of the project. It appears to be at the orders of KiwiRail. The photo tells the story I really don’t have to say much more.

I wonder how those Task Force Green workers and other unemployed workers feel to see what they had contributed to the Mosgiel community, in part, being ripped up.

KiwiRail weren’t the first to vandalise this project, the Dunedin City Council had first crack and destroyed over half of this area by putting in the footpath that you can see in the photo. When they could have quite easily put the footpath on the other side of the road. This would have made it much safer for the school children of East Taieri, as they wouldn’t have had to cross the road twice as they do now to get to school.

The Community Board made this project part of the Otago 150 years’ celebrations. There has been a Fonterra Environmental award, The Queens Service Medal award, and Keep Dunedin Beautiful Awards for this project, but it appears that hasn’t stopped the vandalism.

[ends]

█ What if? Dunedin notes this has happened on Cr Kate Wilson’s watch (Cr Wilson has been appointed to Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board as the DCC representative). It seems incumbent on DCC and ORC to seek a compensatory amount from KiwiRail for instatement of a new Community Project in the immediate area taking into account the devastating loss of the local community’s green amenity, historical investment of effort to establish the plantings in a difficult location, and the years of plant growth and cover destroyed.
Clearly, a distress and a humiliation.

Received from Brian Miller
Sat, 21 Mar 2015 at 6:15 p.m.

Message: The Vandals are on the way.
These new photographs show:
1) The metal plaque confirming that the Railway corridor project was a ‘150 year’ project.
2) The sign up the pole is rather interesting —it shows DCC promoting an illegal activity: riding a bicycle on the footpath. A shared footpath and cycleway…. this is completely opposite to what the Council’s Transportation Planning manager wrote in response to a letter to the editor (ODT 13.11.14). She said in the reply: ‘To clarify, cycling on the footpath is illegal in NZ unless you are a NZ post employee or the bike has a wheel diameter less that 355mm usually a tricycle or small child’s bicycle.’
3) ALL the shrubs and trees for removal at Mosgiel’s Memorial Park on the proposed site of the new pool complex —described in the Taieri Community Facilities Trust’s (the pool trust) documents as “minimal site impact”, located to “minimize the removal of existing vegetation”.

Regards
Brian Miller

Gladstone Rd railway corridor project plaque

Gladstone Rd, cycle sign Continue reading

79 Comments

Filed under Business, Construction, DCC, Democracy, Design, Economics, Events, Geography, KiwiRail, Name, New Zealand, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Tourism, Urban design

Dunedin Heritage Re-use Awards @Wall Street mall

This year’s Dunedin Heritage Re-use Award winners will be announced later this week at Wall Street mall.

The Awards celebrate excellence, innovation and sensitivity in the re-use of heritage buildings in Dunedin and include categories for earthquake strengthening, interiors and overall re-use. A student design competition is also held during the year, which challenges students to develop innovative solutions to the re-use of Dunedin’s older buildings.

If not invited to the Awards Ceremony check out the exhibition during shop hours. The board display is located near Marbecks cafe and the Lifts at Wall Street. [● Inconveniently. the exhibition closed on the night of the Awards, Wednesday 26 March]

Enticements. Here’s a selection of student ‘re-use’ studies for the Athenaeum in the lower Octagon, taken by cameraphone on Friday. The building is owned by entrepreneur Lawrie Forbes.

Athenaeum IMG_20140321_141658-1Athenaeum IMG_20140321_141458-1Athenaeum IMG_20140321_142640Athenaeum IMG_20140321_142906Athenaeum IMG_20140321_141614-1Love the (lowrise) tower, it accents the building successfully for functional and community use.

The Awards are judged by a panel that includes Dunedin City Councillors, representatives from the New Zealand Historic Places Trust, the local branch of the New Zealand Institute of Architects and the Institute of Professional Engineers of New Zealand, and building owners.

█ This year’s Award winners are revealed here.
The names of last year’s Award winners are listed here.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

8 Comments

Filed under Architecture, DCC, Design, Events, Heritage, Innovation, Inspiration, IPENZ, New Zealand, NZHPT, NZIA, Otago Polytechnic, People, Site, University of Otago, Urban design

2013 Southern Architecture Awards – NZ Institute of Architects

Civic rejuvenation a theme of Southern Architecture Awards

15 November 2013

Buildings that acknowledge a rich colonial heritage were celebrated in the 2013 Southern Architecture Awards, announced at Remarkables Primary School in Queenstown on Friday, 15 November.

The 12 award-winning projects span a number of architectural types, ranging from public buildings such as museums and bus shelters, to a gymnasium and study centre, and private homes located across the Otago and Southland regions.

Convenor of the jury, Queenstown architect Bronwen Kerr, said judging was made all the more rewarding because the team was able to visit a few gems, buildings, she said, that “instantly uplift the soul”. One such project was Pitches Store in the small settlement of Ophir, originally built in the 1880s and since refurbished to become a restaurant and hotel. “That was a definite highlight,” Kerr said. “It was wonderful to see how a single building could enhance the spirit of a town.” Similarly, in Cromwell, a new bus shelter and block of toilets, although utilitarian, are the first stage of a project heralding a “rejuvenation” of the public face of that historic town.

Architects Justin Wright and Nick Mouat, along with broadcaster Leanne Malcolm, joined Kerr on the Awards jury. Although there was much debate, the jury shared a similar response to the projects they visited. “There was a nice alignment in the way we thought and felt about the buildings,” Kerr said.

The jury members agreed that the redeveloped Toitu Otago Settlers Museum is a “remarkable asset” for Dunedin. The project unites various structures from different eras into a cohesive whole and does a good job of connecting the railway station to Queens Gardens, Kerr said. “It’s not just a museum honouring the history of the early settlers, it’s also a ‘museum of buildings’.”

While the scale of the museum is large, many of the award-winning buildings had modest budgets. “We gave a number of awards to houses that were not big or expensive,” Kerr said. For example, an energy-efficient suburban home in Wanaka and a simple bach at the mouth of the Taieri River, constructed in just eight weeks, felt so comfortable that the jury just “didn’t want to leave”.

██ NZIA 2013 Southern Architecture Awards – winners information, citations and more photos at NZIA website

Recipients of 2013 Southern Architecture Awards

A building that successfully threads together stands of architectural history is a double Awards winner. Toitu Otago Settlers Museum in Dunedin has been transformed into a “living archive” and given a dramatic new entrance area by Baker Garden Architects and Robert Tongue Architect.

In awarding the project in the Public Architecture category, the jury commented that the contemporary glass addition not only provides an “entrance with clarity” but reconnects the museum to the city in a “physical and community sense”.

NZIA Southern 2013 Toitu Otago Settlers MuseumNZIA Southern 2013 Toitu Otago Settlers Museum 1

Toitu Otago Settlers Museum was also recognised in the Heritage category. The same architects had amalgamated a “unique aggregate of buildings” while skilfully managing to hide the “sophisticated environmental mechanics” of a modern museum to deliver a seamless visitor experience.

Smaller in size but just as significant within the context of community, Pitches Store was the second project to feature in the Heritage category. Michael Wyatt Architect’s refurbishment and sensitive restoration of this old stone store had kept the building’s “endearing rawness,” the jury said.

A new gymnasium in a Dunedin college and a modern study centre at the University of Otago were awarded in the Education category.

NZIA Southern 2013 John McGlashan College Gymnasium 1John McGlashan College’s gymnasium, designed by McCoy and Wixon Architects would, the jury said, lure even the most reluctant student to participate in physical education. With its views over a golf-course and its industrial materiality, the gymnasium “retains its individuality” while sharing a language with a community of existing school buildings.

NZIA Southern 2013 Marsh Study CentreMason & Wales Architects’ redevelopment of the iconic ‘Gardies’ tavern recognises the “importance of the social” in the university context. The new Marsh Study Centre is not only a place of learning but, with its café and living area with a welcoming fireplace, is also a place of retreat.

The idea of refuge was explored by the same architects in Taieri Mouth Bach NZIA Southern 2013 Taieri Mouth Bachwhich, along with a bus shelter and public toilets, was acknowledged in the Awards’ Small Architecture category.
Mason & Wales Architects used a simple gable and “straightforward and robust” materials to capture “rawness” in this Kiwi bach which settles into the dunes, surrounded by fishing shacks. “If it were a poem, the building would be a haiku,” the jury said.

A pattern of falling leaves, cut in relief from a rusted steel sheet, brings a poetic influence to two workaday structures near the Cromwell Mall. Mary Jowett Architects’ clever design of this screen to provide privacy for the entrance of the public loo while simultaneously acting as a backdrop to the new bus shelter, achieves “lightness and delicacy” even while using a “robust and enduring” material palette.

Six private dwellings received awards – two in Wanaka, two in Dunedin and one each in Alexandra and Lake Hayes.

Awarded in both the Housing and Sustainable Architecture categories, Acland House by Rafe Maclean Architects is a family home in suburban Wanaka organised around three courtyards providing outdoor shelter from mountain breezes. The house also features hydronic heating in the floor and windows designed to act as “wind catchers” in the hot summer months.

The jury was understandably reluctant to leave when it visited Emerald Bluffs House by RTA Studio, also in Wanaka. The house enjoys views that celebrate its connection to landscape, enfolds as a “beautiful balance of private and collective spaces” and uses a tapestry of materials that “rewards all the senses”.

Further south, in Alexandra, Irving Smith Jack Architects referenced the tent villages of the gold-panning pioneers in a home built in a “raw and boundless landscape”. The home, with its insulated concrete core, tilted fly roofs and planning that is eccentric yet charming is, the jury said, “the original anti-villa”.

The first of the Dunedin duo in the Housing categoryNZIA Southern 2013 Black and White House of the Awards is a strong composition in black and white on Maori Hill. McCoy and Wixon Architects used an internal courtyard to imbue a compact design with a feeling of spaciousness. “Thoughtful and consistent” detailing augments the planning of this home constructed on a tight budget.

A steep site in the hills west of the city allowed Architectural Ecology to design a house that connects strongly with the vertical view of trees. The jury said the design of the Helensburgh Road HouseNZIA Southern 2013 Helensburgh Road House is “happily unafraid of complexity”. In keeping with the owners’ eco-friendly philosophies, sustainable timbers have been extensively used in a “multitude of exuberant forms” that cascade down the hillside.

Cedar, masonry and zinc are the material trio making up Lake Hayes Residence, designed by Warren and Mahoney Architects on a steep slope adjacent to a public walkway. The project, which comprises two forms and includes split-level flooring, was praised for its flexible planning which allows it to “morph between a comfortable home for two and a holiday house for wider family.”

The Southern Architecture Awards is a peer-reviewed programme of the New Zealand Institute of Architects. All recipients of 2013 Southern Architecture Awards are eligible for consideration for the top tier of the annual Architecture Awards programme, the New Zealand Architecture Awards. These awards will be announced in May 2014.

The New Zealand Architecture Awards are supported by Resene and judged by juries appointed by the New Zealand Institute of Architects and its branches.

Source: NZIA News & Media

ODT 16.11.13 Acclaim for great designs

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

1 Comment

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, Design, Economics, Events, Geography, Heritage, Innovation, Inspiration, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, Urban design

Architecture + Women Southern

architecture women Nov 2013 copy[click to enlarge]

Website: Architecture + Women

Related Post:
21.4.13 Architecture + Women • New Zealand

Snapshot 500: Architecture + Women New Zealand
Edited by Julia Gatley, Sara Lee et al – $29.95
Published by Balasoglou Books, September 2013, paperback, 210x150mm, 98pages, 9780987659552

Snapshot 500 coverThis small book belies its importance. There has never been anything like it published before – celebrating women in New Zealand architecture. It doubles as the catalogue for a series of events throughout the country. We believe it is a must for anyone interested in architecture and women’s place in it.

Women architects and designers have made a huge contribution to architecture and the built environment in New Zealand for many years. Many of these women are still not household names but they are nevertheless admired and respected in the profession.

This book presents close to 500 women, all involved in New Zealand architecture in some way, shape or form, from lead designer, company director and project manager through to graduate, student and team member. It shows that women have been leaders in every aspect of architectural design and production in this country, and that women architecture graduates are widely dispersed, both geographically and in their creative modes and outlets. The book was initiated through a newly formed society, Architecture + Women • New Zealand, and coincides with substantial exhibitions in Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Queenstown. It will appeal to anyone with an interest in contemporary New Zealand architecture and design.

It includes two introductory texts, the first by the four A+W NZ co-founders (Megan Rule, Lynda Simmons, Sarah Treadwell and Julie Wilson) and the second by Julia Gatley. This is followed by images illustrating the work of almost 400 women involved with architecture in New Zealand, and mention of the names of many more, such as those involved with the A+WNZ incorporated society and the exhibitions in Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Queenstown.

Enquiries: www.aaltobooks.co.nz

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

2 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, Design, Economics, Events, Fun, Geography, Heritage, Innovation, Inspiration, New Zealand, NZIA, People, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, Urban design