Tag Archives: Asia

NHNZ development mode (new business, markets)

“It’s like the next version of NHNZ. It’s like NHNZ version 3.1 in a lot of ways, version one being when we were part of TVNZ, version two being when [former managing director] Michael Stedman took over and gave us a new lease of life, and this is another step.” –Kyle Murdoch, NHNZ

### ODT Online Wed, 27 Nov 2013
Children’s TV for NHNZ
By Vaughan Elder
Dunedin’s NHNZ is preparing to take on the likes of Disney with the launch of its own international children’s television channel. NHNZ managing director Kyle Murdoch said, in preparation for the launch of the channel next February, 54 staff were hard at work in Dunedin producing content for it. About 40 were new staff who had joined the office since the middle of this year.
Read more

● Michael Stedman, former managing director, retired at the beginning of this year.

NHNZ website (detail)Natural History New Zealand website [screenshot detail]

Wikipedia: NHNZ

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Waterfront hotel: DCC to notify resource consent application

UPDATED POST 26.9.12
Who is behind the resource consent application? Find out here.
How do I make a submission on the application? Go to DCC webpage.

Dunedin City Council
Media Release

Resource consent sought for major hotel

This item was published on 07 Sep 2012.

Betterways Advisory Limited has confirmed its interest in building a waterfront hotel and residential apartments on Dunedin’s Wharf Street. Further information sought by the Council has now been provided and formal notification of the company’s plans for the site will proceed.

The proposed hotel will have 27 floors plus a basement and will contain 215 bedrooms, two restaurants, two bars, a swimming pool for in-house use, as well as 182 on-site parking spaces, and a drop off/pick up area for two coaches. The building will also accommodate 164 self-contained apartments.

The application, which will be notified in Saturday’s Otago Daily Times, is accompanied by an assessment of environmental effects, revised plans and elevations, an architectural design statement, montages of the proposed hotel from viewpoints around Dunedin, shade diagrams, an integrated transport assessment, a reverse sensitivity study report, an infrastructure feasibility report, and a wind assessment report.

The Wharf Street site is zoned Industrial 1. The general area is shown on the Hazards Register as being reclaimed land, at risk to seismic activity. Commercial residential activity and residential activity are considered to be non-complying activities under the District Plan and so the resource consent for the hotel needs to be notified.

Anyone wanting to make submissions on the application has until 5 October 2012 to do so. The application can be viewed at www.dunedin.govt.nz/rma or by visiting the City Planning desk at the Dunedin City Council Service Centre. Information on making a submission and copies of the submission form can also be accessed online or obtained from the DCC Service Centre.

Contact Resource Consents Manager on 477 4000.

DCC Link

Related Posts and Comments:
8.9.12 Waterfront Hotel #Dunedin (Applicant names?)
23.6.12 Mis(t)apprehension: website visits, not bookings?
16.5.12 Dunedin Hotel

Betterways Advisory Limited
Previous name: DOLCE LMW LIMITED (15 Dec 2011)
Company number: 3142026
Incorporation Date: 23 Sep 2010
Company Status: Registered
Entity type: NZ Limited Company
Company Addresses:
Registered Office: RODGERS LAW, Level 4, 151-155 Princes Street, Dunedin
Address for service: RODGERS LAW, Level 4, 151-155 Princes Street, Dunedin

Directors: (1 of 1)
Stephen John RODGERS
20 Braeview Crescent, Maori Hill, Dunedin 9010

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Design, Economics, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

Dunedin Hotel

UPDATED POST 26.9.12
Who is behind the resource consent application? Find out here.
How do I make a submission on the application? Go to DCC webpage


Published on May 13, 2012 by DunedinNZofficial

Plans for a five star, 28-storey luxury hotel, proposed for Dunedin’s waterfront, have been revealed at Dunedin’s Forsyth Barr Stadium.

The hotel will position the city as a high-end tourism destination and provide a major boost to the region’s economic development.

The proposed hotel will be the tallest building in Dunedin by a significant margin providing uninterrupted views across the city either to Swampy Summit or the Otago peninsula. It will comprise both hotel and apartment accommodation, a swimming pool, a rooftop restaurant, car parks and a penthouse presidential suite.

The $100 million development is currently going through the resource consent process and is destined for completion by 2015.

Or so it says at YouTube.

UPDATE 28.5.12
The city council is pledging to put out the red carpet and not the red tape.

“Don’t let us become the New Zealand equivalent of Springfield from the Simpsons TV show” –Andrew Metcalfe

ODT Online news and opinion:
26.5.12 Tough time for builders in city
18.5.12 Links to city sealed hotel development
13.5.12 Hotel proposal
12.5.12 Hotel developers remain a mystery
11.5.12 $100m hotel for Dunedin waterfront
11.5.12 Harbour hotel proposed for Dunedin

Related Post and Comments:
8.9.12 Waterfront Hotel #Dunedin (Applicant names?)
7.9.12 Waterfront hotel: DCC to notify resource consent application
26.10.11 Dunedin Harbourside: DCC “caved”

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Design, Economics, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Town planning, Urban design, What stadium

Dunedin and the southern region’s business future

THE CLIMATE
(we’re sluggish, indebted and unproductive, working long hours for unremarkable results, there’s little or no ability to pay all our living expenses even if we can afford a mortgage — few Dunedin businesses are on the global map, very few of our citizens invest in ‘research and development’ or know what export truly involves — there is splendid isolation, no cohesion, and a striking absence of astute regional leadership)

Our economy is drifting in very dangerous shoals. The only plausible avenue to sustained growth will be export-led. The high value of the dollar precludes this. Unless we act now the painful process of rebalancing our economy will be forced upon us at some future stage. At that point the pain will be even greater.

### ODT Online Fri, 4 May 2012
Opinion
Boosting export sector only way out of malaise
By Peter Lyons
We are living in a world of zombie economies including our own. These economies are characterised by high debt levels, stagnant or shrinking economies and policies of austerity that offer no solution. Finance Minister Bill English is promising a budget of little hope. He offers austerity almost with relish. It fits his ideological bent towards smaller government. A further unexpected $1 billion budget shortfall precludes any positive spending initiatives. Meanwhile the governor of the Reserve Bank wrings his hands over the high New Zealand dollar which is shredding our export sector. He has maintained this ineffective stance for a number of years.

Positive economic management appears beyond the scope of our policy makers.

New Zealand has been in or on the verge of recession since 2007. Most of the Western world has followed a similar path.
Read more

****

LOCAL SENSELESSNESS
(where the ad hoc stadium spend has crippled the council, all the time missing the bigger outlook of how to serve the South Island’s contribution to export-led economic recovery — oh hey, the council’s junior bureaucrats and mayor say let’s play dress-ups with a few central city warehouses and six suburban amenity centres — the Dunedin City Council has to undergo major attitudinal and structural change)

Apart from the ongoing clusters, there has never seemed to be any straightforward strategy to push economic growth in the city or the region.

### ODT Online Sat, 5 May 2012
Planning for future of Dunedin Inc
By Dene Mackenzie
Dunedin’s economic development draft strategy will be released on Monday. For the first time, the document will be signed off by stakeholders representing diverse areas of the city. There are several things business editor Dene Mackenzie hopes will be included in the new 10-year plan. For about 25 years, Dunedin’s economic strategy has doddered along. Past plans have included Dunedin City Council officers travelling to visit large-scale manufacturing enterprises in a bid to persuade them to establish themselves within the city boundaries, through to catchy slogans and billboards at airports. During that time, the city has seen its large-scale manufacturing base shrink with the loss of thousands of jobs.

Reviews of city council funding strategies need to be undertaken and the strategy must be inclusive of the needs of the business community. It seems that, often, funding decisions are applied on an ad hoc basis, when better value could be extracted from ratepayer funds.

More than 90% of Dunedin businesses are said to have no intention of exporting in the future and the city captured only 2.5% of the country’s recent migrants. That must change for the city to grow and prosper.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, DCC, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Innovation, Media, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Stadiums, Town planning, Urban design

RWC Merchandise

### tvnz.co.nz 9:34AM Monday June 27, 2011
Investigation reveals RWC merchandise made in China
Source: ONE News
A Close Up investigation to screen on TV ONE tonight has revealed that tourists buying official Rugby World Cup merchandise could be in for a shock. Close Up reporter Kate Lynch told TV ONE’s Breakfast today that most of the All Blacks’ World Cup memorabilia isn’t made in New Zealand – it’s made in China.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Port Otago downgraded to regional status only

UPDATED

### ODT Online Tue, 17 May 2011
Maersk to drop weekly service to Australia
By Simon Hartley
Shipping giant Maersk, Port Otago’s largest customer, is dropping its weekly direct Southern Star transtasman service to Australia, the country’s largest trading partner. While the financial ramifications for Otago exporters are unclear, Port Otago will lose 10%, or about 22,000 TEUs (twenty foot equivalent container units), during the next year.
Read more

(16 May) News of Port of Otago’s downgrade filtered through on (Black) Friday.

It has yet to hit Otago Daily Times’ reporting with any force . . . we might get some analysis if we’re lucky, or interested.

Maersk. Fonterra.
Two cosy words that when read together spell no accident.

It’s been in the offing. Maersk has pulled the rugs on a number of New Zealand ports, Otago included – no doubt to ratchet lower port charges, not merely to facilitate freighting of New Zealand exports into Asia.

It’s far from clear what the costs of reducing local ports of call (in favour of long distance trucking and rail freighting to the North Island’s port of Tauranga) will be for exporters in the Otago Southland region.

We noticed, with suspicion, it was Lyttelton that walked away from a merger with Port Otago. We knew it wasn’t all down to [pretext] #eqnz.

We note too – sadly, for the regional economy – that Otago is frightfully good at exporting raw, not processed, logs. Such a very happy picture we have left of what POL is good for, apart from calls by oil boats and cruise liners.

We lost transhipping with no warning. Wonder if ORC is ruffled or upset. Who knew.

ODT has hidden or failed to surface with the implications of the Maersk decision, preferring to run a diatribe about KiwiRail and “inland ports” for Otago. It’s not as if the subjects are not connected. We expect the local newspaper to make the major news statements and connections palpable, in a timely manner.

A whole weekend has elapsed. Further, Maersk’s decision is in no way surprising, there was ample time for ODT to research the background.

Clues. Fonterra has been using POL logistics to prototype and determine how inland ports can be rolled out across New Zealand.

Worries. Port Otago has been on an export ‘growth wave’, not of its own making, for some years. Does the port board know how to create growth of its own or diversify its activities to meet the challenge dumped on it by (cosy) Maersk and Fonterra?

Did the port company properly attend to risk management before Black Friday?

(Aside) POL chief executive Geoff Plunket reiterates – as we learned from POL’s Peter Brown a few years ago – the company is of the view that State Highway 88 (Dunedin to Port Chalmers) has sufficient capacity to take all trucking freight. Public safety didn’t come into the equation then, and it doesn’t appear to now. But how many trucks won’t be using SH88 at all in the near future.

Lots to think about. Investigation required. News media, DCC, EDU, ORC, Otago Chamber, POL, exporters, port workers, unions, KiwiRail . . . it’s your time to start digging.

****

Friday 13 May
nzherald.co.nz Maersk changes to benefit NZ exporters
voxy.co.nz Maersk Line NZ Strengthens Links With Key Regional Hub Ports

Monday 16 May
odt.co.nz KiwiRail backs inland ports

****

Related Posts and Comments:
21.2.10 So where’s the media explosion?
26.2.10 Port Otago: “Next generation” project
27.3.10 Why should Port Otago dredge?
21.4.10 SH88 realignment
21.7.10 SH88 realignment – update

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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