Tag Archives: Artists

Len Lye Centre, Govett-Brewster Art Gallery #NewPlymouth

DESTINATION ARCHITECTURE

Len Lye Centre New Plymouth [Govett-Brewster Art Gallery]

“Because of its dairy and gas industries stainless is, in architectural terms, Taranaki’s local stone. The finished building is a showcase for this expertise.” –Andrew Patterson, Len Lye Centre architect

The Len Lye Centre, which opens in New Plymouth today, is a world-class building dedicated to our most innovative, versatile artist.

### NZ Herald Online 11:00 AM Saturday Jul 25, 2015
Len Lye: The father of invention
By Adam Gifford
If Len Lye didn’t exist, you couldn’t have invented him. Born at the dawn of the 20th century, he was the inquisitive kid from the wrong side of the tracks who got thrown out of Samoa for being too friendly, then shovelled coal on a steamer to get to London where he hung out with poets and painters and looked for ways to make art that moved.
In England it was film. In the United States, after he was head-hunted in 1944 to work for the March of Time newsreel service, he made sculpture. He became one of the pioneers of what was dubbed kinetic sculpture, making some works and planning many others beyond the technology of the day.
A visit back to his homeland, New Zealand, brought him into contact with engineers immersed in working steel for the dairy and oil industries, who embraced his vision and set about realising his designs. In the workshops of Taranaki he found not underlings but fellow explorers who strove to understand the properties of the metal.
It was to Taranaki that he left his life’s work on his death in 1980 and it is there, in New Zealand’s first gallery dedicated to the work of a single artist, that the work will continue to cement his position as an artist of influence.
Read more

Because….
He was reluctant to sell beneath his value, a lot of the material stayed with him and ended up with us. So his time as a kinetic sculptor is coming again because the material is well-maintained here.
Because….
Lye expected many of his works could not be made with the technology available to him, he endowed the Len Lye Foundation with a licence to create unrealised work or reconstruct existing work.

25.7.15 @ New Plymouth
The public has had its chance to take a first glimpse inside the new $12 million Len Lye Centre. The building has already earned notoriety for its stunning 32-tonne, 14m-high mirror-grade stainless steel facade.

█ Patterson Associates Ltd | pattersons.com

Len Lye Centre graphic 1bw [screenshot]Len Lye Centre graphic 2 [screenshot]

### radionz.co.nz 25 July 2015
RNZ National – Saturday Morning with Kim Hill
Paul Brobbel, Len Lye
9:40 AM. Paul Brobbel is Len Lye Curator at the Govett Brewster Art Gallery, supporting the development and delivery of Len Lye exhibitions and looking after the Len Lye Collection. (slideshow)
Audio | Download: OggMP3 ( 20′ 03″ )

Taranaki Daily News:
New Plymouth welcomes its Len Lye Centre with open arms
Len Lye Centre opening day (photo gallery + related links)
Len Lye’s niece moved to tears by new gallery
Len Lye Centre serves up café

NZH: Shiny new Len Lye Centre opens its doors
NZH: Blind faith in art
RNZ News: Public eyes dazzling Len Lye Centre

ONE News: Opening of Len Lye centre a historic moment for Kiwi art community (7:50 pm)
3NEWS: Len Lye Centre opens its doors (12:00 pm)

Len Lye Centre, New Plymouth - Mirror image [Glenn Jeffrey]Len Lye Centre [Brittany Mackenzie]Len Lye Centre illuminated [Stuff]

LEN LYE CALLED THE GOVETT-BREWSTER THE SWINGINGEST GALLERY IN THE ANTIPODES

█ The Govett-Brewster Art Gallery is relaunching with an exhibition entitled Our Hearts of Darkness, which is an examination of violence in New Zealand through the lens of contemporary art from the gallery’s collection
█ The Len Lye Centre’s first ever exhibition is a “best of” called Len Lye’s Jam Session, both shows run until December.

http://govettbrewster.com/Len-Lye/Centre
http://govettbrewster.com/Home

VIDEO

Govett- Brewster Published on Aug 27, 2012
Len Lye Centre
An experimental film-maker, poet, painter, kinetic sculptor, eccentric and ebullient personality, Len Lye is on of New Zealand’s most widely-known modernist artists. The Govett-Brewster Art Gallery is home to the archives and studio collection of the Len Lye Foundation.
Born in Christchurch in 1901 and largely self-educated, Lye was driven by a life-long passion for motion, energy and the possibility of composing them as a form of art. Lye’s interests took him far from New Zealand; after sojourns in the South Pacific, Lye moved to London and then New York, where he became known as an intensely creative film-maker and kinetic sculptor.
In 1977, Len Lye returned to his homeland to oversee the first New Zealand exhibition of his work at the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery. Shortly before his death in 1980, Lye and his supporters established the Len Lye Foundation, to which he gave his work. The Gallery is the repository for much of this collection, employing a full-time curator to ensure its preservation and appropriate exhibition.
Lye’s sculptures are also held in the collections of several major art museums, including the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) and Whitney Museum in New York, and the Art Institute of Chicago. Major repositories of Lye’s film work include the New Zealand Film Archive, the British Film Institute and the Museum of Modern Art.

Govett- Brewster Published on Sep 16, 2013
Len Lye Centre – New Plymouth, Aotearoa New Zealand
Opening 2015. Since 1970, the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery has continued to be a beacon for contemporary art. A new phase in the Govett-Brewster’s history begins with the construction of the Len Lye Centre as well as earthquake strengthening, Gallery upgrades and building compliance on the original building. The new combined facility, reopening in 2015, will extend the Govett-Brewster’s ability to offer extraordinary experiences with contemporary art while offering a new permanent home for the art and ideas of Len Lye.

Govett- Brewster Published on Dec 14, 2014
Govett-Brewster Art Gallery
It’s been ten years down and just six months to go on the fundraising and building of Aotearoa New Zealand’s newest cultural icon – the Len Lye Centre, combined with the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery here in New Plymouth. The Len Lye Centre is the first piece of destination architecture linked to contemporary art in New Zealand, unique for its architecture, vision and the fact that building of this sort hasn’t been done before in our island nation. –Simon Rees, Govett-Brewster Art Gallery/Len Lye Centre Director

Govett- Brewster Published on May 17, 2015
The inspiration behind the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery/Len Lye Centre brand identity
New Zealand’s museum of contemporary art, the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery unveils its new brand as it prepares to open its doors with the Len Lye Centre, 25 July 2015.

Len Lye artist [Stuff]

DiabolikDanger Published on Jul 11, 2014
Len Lye – Exact from Free Radicals
Filmed in Tate Liverpool
An example of direct film – making.
Free Radicals is a black-and-white animated film short by avant-garde filmmaker Len Lye. Begun in 1958 and completed in 1979, Lye made the film by directly scratching the film stock. The resulting “figures of motion” are set to music by the Bagirmi tribe of Africa.
In 2008, the film was added to the United States National Film Registry.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images: (from the top) Govett-Brewster Art Gallery – Len Lye Centre; whatifdunedin [BW screenshots] – Len Lye Centre architectural renders; Glenn Jeffrey – Len Lye Centre [via Stuff]; Brittany Mackenzie – Len Lye Centre [via Stuff]; Stuff – Len Lye Centre illuminated; Stuff – Len Lye, artist (archival)

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Botanic Garden: Visitor-vandals caught by DCC webcam

“Dunedin City Council parks manager Mick Reece said the botanic garden team had been intending to install security video for some time, but the weekend’s vandalism had made it an imperative.” –ODT

oooooohhh . . .

Botanic Garden DCC webcam Saturday 11.1.14Ouroboros with nighttime visitors via DCC webcam. Photo supplied.
[click to enlarge]

The group were there for about 15 minutes on Saturday 11 January.

DCC website: Dunedin Botanic Garden cam
Views of the botanic garden from the top of Croque-o-Dile café.

### ODT Online Wed, 15 Jan 2014
Vandalism spurs CCTV move
By Debbie Porteous
Closed-curcuit television is to be installed at the Dunedin Botanic Garden after vandals damaged the city’s latest piece of public art. Someone entered the garden at the weekend and put a dint in the steel worm sculpture, also known as Ouroboros. The sculpture was installed in mid-December.
Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
30.12.13 Botanic Garden: Ouroboros (more images)
15.7.13 Art in public places: Dunedin worms and wyrms #snakesinthegrass
3.1.12 Art in public places #Dunedin

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Botanic Garden: Ouroboros

Worm re-imaged EKlr IMG_4117

### ODT Online Sat, 14 Dec 2013
The worm has turned up
By Debbie Porteous
A giant glowing worm has appeared above ground at the Dunedin Botanic Garden. It is not a supernatural phenomenon, but the city’s latest piece of public art. The flexible worm, which can bend because it is constructed from thousands of pieces of interlocked and articulating marine-grade stainless steel, was installed over the past two days.
Read more

Worm 3b IMG_4401

Worm 2small IMG_4369

Worm 1a IMG_4386

Comment at ODT Online:

Worm and landscaping spend
Submitted by ej kerr on Mon, 23/12/2013 – 3:20pm.
Interesting as always to read your columnist Peter Entwisle’s opinions of the stainless Ouroboros at the Botanic Garden (Art Beat, 23.12.13), and the shoddy process adopted by the city council. This alien is planted in an exceptionally poor section of ‘landscaping’ – a meaningless affront of professionally laid and poorly envisioned hard paving, with a ‘playground’ landing pad. The effect of this cynical deadening forecourt on the tea kiosk with its umbrella-style roof is harsh and fully remiss, architecturally – a boffin job of worst kind. Even the ducks are electing to rest for the evening on nearby lawn – having left their excrement across the pavers. Not sure this metalwork is composting!

On Sunday afternoon I was photographing the wormy presence, it’s bluntly phallic at the supported ‘head’ end… when a local resident asked me what I think of the whole thing. Not a good thing to say. He wasn’t terribly impressed either – he said the project in total was worth about $150,000. For such a cruel mess.

Poor Wendy and … Attendants, they need rescue! The fairy tale plot is lost, crashed, abused.

Related Post and Comments:
15.7.13 Art in public places: Dunedin worms and wyrms #snakesinthegrass
20.5.13 Comment [ODT item and DCC report]

Worm Kiosk EKlr IMG_4179

Worm EKlr IMG_4164

Post and images by Elizabeth Kerr

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‘Yellow Balloon’ —Blue Oyster invitation to (TOWER) Submitters et al

Shane McGrath (yellow blimp) 15-4-13 IMG_3188alrTo Everyone who enjoyed the sight of artist Shane McGrath’s Gelber LuftBallon flying HIGH over Customhouse Quay on Monday 15 April

AND

To ALL Submitters on the (LUC-2012-212) Betterways Advisory Ltd application to construct a 28-storey hotel and apartment building at 41 Wharf Street

_____

You are warmly invited to the forthcoming exhibition hosted at Blue Oyster Art Project Space | Basement, 24b Moray Place, Dunedin

[public domain] Submitters may find their submissions pinned to the wall.

BO_GELBER_B4_WEB

Gelber LuftBallon (Dunedin Research Project) is a series of new work created by Melbourne-based artist Shane McGrath.
McGrath’s practice has used rockets, planes and zeppelins as metaphors for escapism, exploration, memory and tragedy. For this series McGrath has been investigating the public debates around Dunedin’s proposed wharf hotel development. McGrath sees the issue as one that concerns the city as a whole, which has the potential to impact dramatically on the city’s future.

During the public submissions process there were calls for an on-site, tethered balloon to be used as an indication as to how tall the hotel would be. Using this suggestion as an entry point for his investigation, McGrath launched a balloon near the proposed site on Monday 15 April. In this context the balloon is not only a practical object for measuring height, but also references times of conflict (barrage balloons) which were designed to allay fears of attack and also to indicate that the city was under attack.

Gelber LuftBallon is not a didactic work or a protest, but simply a catalyst to encourage debate and add to the ongoing dialogue. The results and ephemera of the research project and balloon launch will form the core of the exhibition at the Blue Oyster which opens on Tuesday 23 April.

Watch the video at http://blueoyster.org.nz/upcoming/shane-mcgrath/

****

Shane McGrath has a BFA and an MFA from Massey University. In 2011 he was commissioned by City Gallery Wellington to create a permanent sculpture in Wellington’s Glover Park as a part of the The Obstinate Object exhibition. He is represented by Bartley and Company, Wellington.

Blue Oyster Art Project Space
The Blue Oyster Arts Trust (BOAT) was founded in Dunedin in 1999 as the governing body of the Blue Oyster Art Project Space that provides a high quality, dynamic program of experimental and innovative contemporary art practice. BOAT is a non-profit and non-commercial organisation that is made up of practicing artists, curators and other creative professionals. The art project space allows a diverse range of artists to work experimentally, free from commercial restraints and irrespective of the stage of their career. Blue Oyster aims to broaden the interest and understanding of contemporary arts by providing a forum for discussion and debate regarding contemporary art issues.

The Blue Oyster is supported by Creative New Zealand | Toi Aotearoa and Dunedin City Council | Kaunihera-a-rohe o Otepoti

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Peninsula Art & Craft Auction

Macandrew Bay Primary School is hosting the Peninsula Art and Craft Auction at the Guthrie Pavilion, Shore Street, on Thursday evening, 3 November (see poster for details).

The ticket price includes one complimentary drink and nibbles.
Tickets may also be purchased on the night.

Downloads:
POSTER 2011 rev (PDF, 1.97 MB)
Catalogue with Photos.v2 (PDF, 1.79 MB)

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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LostArtChch website to identify items at risk #eqnz

Cultural Property and Natural Disaster

Hamish Keith, worried about Christchurch art in the wake of the earthquake,
has set up a website to identify items which may be at risk.

LostArtChch website: http://lostartchch.org.nz/

After the Christchurch earthquake many artists studios, galleries and private homes with art collections were damaged or isolated. This site allows artists and owners to make a record of what is at risk and where it is. That record is secure to the owner or artist and will only be passed on to earthquake recovery authorities.

If you have works of art, antiques or other cultural valuables at risk in Christchurch you can record them here.

Expert says protection needed for at risk Chch artworks
Hamish Keith on Morning Report today (duration: 3′04″)
Audio Ogg vorbis MP3

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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The dodgy decisions, the lack of respect, the breaking of promises

The Star newspaper runs a ‘disturbed’ story on page one (20 Jan 2011), a not very surprising one given the DCC general manager concerned.

The Dunedin i-Site, formerly housed in the Municipal Chambers, temporarily relocated to the Community Gallery in Princes Street, is likely to stay in the Princes Street gallery space.

We remember how despicably artists and gallery users were treated by the Dunedin City Council when asked to move out of the gallery, only to be shoved into an inadequate lacklustre space of no good address in Lower Moray Place.

The Community Gallery was to be back in its former location by Easter this year.

Not so.

The general manager of Customer Services Grant Strang deserves a paint bomb, or three. It seems the siting of the Community Gallery is a bit of an afterthought. We’re not saying the Princes Street space was ideal for exhibition, indeed its proportions, scale, hanging system (out of the ark) and lighting were problematic. We’re saying the community of gallery users deserves better treatment and respect.

The mission: Strang better not rest until he finds a superior, prominently-located, professionally fitted out exhibition space for all potential users of the Community Gallery. ASAP.

A place gallery users can be proud of, a comfortable welcoming space that celebrates the people, their efforts, artistic expression and production – somewhere the Dunedin community as a whole can provide the best possible support to their activities and endeavours.

Any bright ideas, Mr Strang?

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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