Tag Archives: Art in Public Places

Art in public places: The Fourth Plinth

Rooster-AAP 1‘Hahn/Cock’ surveys London’s Trafalgar Square [AAP]

### 3news.co.nz Fri, 26 Jul 2013 2:53p.m.
Giant blue rooster ruffles London feathers
By Jill Lawless
This might ruffle a few feathers. A giant blue rooster has been unveiled next to the sombre military monuments in London’s Trafalgar Square. German artist Katharina Fritsch’s 4.7 metre ultramarine bird, titled ‘Hahn/Cock’, is intended as a playful counterpoint to the statues of martial heroes in the square. Both ultramarine blue and the rooster are symbols of France, whose defeat by Britain at the battle of Trafalgar in 1805 gave the square its name.
“It’s a nice humorous side-effect to have something French in a place that celebrates victory over Napoleon,” Fritsch told The Guardian newspaper. Fritsch also said she hoped the double meaning in the work’s name would appeal to the British sense of humour. “I know they like to play games with language,” she said.
London Mayor Boris Johnson said it would be a “talking point for Londoners and tourists alike.” It is the latest in a series of artworks to adorn the square’s vacant “Fourth Plinth”.
One of London’s main tourist attractions, the square was named for Horatio Nelson’s victory over the French and Spanish fleets. A statue of the one-armed admiral stands atop Nelson’s Column at the centre of the square, and statues of other 19th-century military leaders are nearby.
The fourth plinth was erected in 1841 for an equestrian statue that was never completed. It remained empty for a century and a half, and since 1999 has been occupied by artworks erected for 18 months at a time. Previous works have included a giant ship in a bottle and 2,400 members of the public who stood atop the plinth for an hour at a time. AP
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15.7.13 Art in public places: Dunedin worms and wyrms #snakesinthegrass
3.1.12 Art in public places #Dunedin

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Art in public places: Dunedin worms and wyrms #snakesinthegrass

Updated post Monday, 2 Feb 2015 at 4:07 p.m.

Worm (Julia Morison)

### ODT Online Mon, 15 Jul 2013
Editorial: How the worm turns
It seems there is nothing quite like the issue of public art to stimulate debate. Whether it be form, function, meaning, materials, longevity, cost, location, the work’s title, or the artist’s “qualifications”, the works inevitably prompt a great outpouring of comments from the public. When it comes to publicly-funded art in the outdoor public arena, it is understandable some ratepayers want to have their say. After all, they have to see it and they have to pay for it. One of the most-debated issues is often the cost, with many projects being deemed expensive.
In a city rich with educational institutions, heritage, and a strong artistic legacy, such projects have been deemed worthy of funding by the council for many years, and frequently indicated as important by the public in the likes of residents opinion surveys. There is no doubt striking the right balance is no easy task, particularly given art, by its very nature, is subjective, and cannot necessarily “please” everyone.
Given that the response to art works is the huge unknown – it is all the more important the areas that can be calculated are done so – and done so clearly: the artist, the artist’s brief, the art work’s purpose, visual expectations including height and size, suitability for its location, and of course, cost. And, sadly, it is in these fundamental areas in which the latest controversial public art proposal appears to have fallen down.
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Worm (Julia Morison) 2

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8.7.13 [Opinion] Art Beat: More than just a muddle
3.7.13 Council rejects artwork criticism
2.7.13 Sculptors question selection process
1.7.13 Botanic Garden to get huge worm
30.6.13 Botanic Garden marks 150th
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images via ODT [screenshots]

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Art in public places #Dunedin

### ODT Online Tue, 3 Jan 2012
Rethinking DCC role in public art
OPINION The Otago Sculpture Trust suggests it might be time for the Dunedin City Council to take a step back from such direct involvement in sculpture in public places. In light of the controversy, particularly over the past two years, regarding installation of sited public art works in Dunedin, we, the Otago Sculpture Trust, feel it is our role as an independent body of professionals to add our voice to the debate, in the hope of creating better understanding around issues of public art here. […] Anomalies between the original and current Dunedin City Council art in public places policies have perhaps accounted for the deterioration in community liaison.
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• The Otago Sculpture Trust was established in 2002 by a group of practising sculptors with a general aim of doing what [it] can to foster and develop sculptural practice across Otago and beyond. The trust seeks to promote public sculpture in its many forms, including accessing resources and influencing public art policies as a lobby group.

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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: Haka Peepshow (aka ‘Black Penis’) by Rachael Rakena, Octagon

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Can it be true? Nahhh #peepshow

Initially, did Ngai Tahu (Kai Tahu) get turned down for Dunedin City Council project funding towards the Haka Peep Show (‘black penis’), now resplendent in the Octagon?

Did Ngai Tahu then come back to DCC saying, more or less, that if DCC didn’t front up with the $50,000 then Council wouldn’t get any co-operation from the tribe with resource consents, etc?

No! This didn’t happen. In any case, the minutes of the Art in Public Places subcommittee (if released), or those of the Community Development Committee (which turned down the APP’s $100,000 funding request) wouldn’t be so specific as to the politics, surely?

No. No. No. A vile rumour, completely fictitious.
Not the way we do things in Dunedin!

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### ODT Online Tue, 20 Sep 2011
Councillors join Ngai Tahu working party
By David Loughrey
Dunedin city councillors Fliss Butcher and Jinty MacTavish have joined a working party that will find “opportunities and mechanisms” for Ngai Tahu to contribute to the city’s decision making.
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ODT columnist Dave Cannan has been asking questions about the artwork. In today’s ‘The Wash’ (ODT, 21.9.11) he says, “The cost of Rachael Rakena’s much-discussed installation is “in the vicinity of $115,000″, although some accounts are still being finalised.”

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DCC Art in Public Places: New work commissioned

UPDATED

ODT 25.2.10: DCC spends $45,000 on tooth sculptures

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Dunedin City Council
Media Release

Putting A Smile Into Harbour’s Head

Plans for the next Dunedin City Council Art in Public Places commission have been released, and harbourside visitors will soon have something to smile about.

Regan Gentry, a Wellington based artist, currently living in Rotterdam, is creating a larger than life sculpture titled ‘Harbour Mouth Molars’ which will feature six wisdom teeth constructed from concrete and Oamaru Stone. Each tooth will be roughly the size of an up-ended Austin mini car and be arranged in two opposing rows on the edge of the foreshore.

The installation, which is due to arrive on-site in April, will stand on the Kitchener Street Reserve at the head of the harbour.

Mr Gentry is well-known for his ‘Flour Power’ steel representation of a sheaf of wheat which stands at the intersection of Christchurch’s Colombo and High Streets, and ‘Green Islands’, the native tree look-alikes made from No.8 fencing wire which were recently relocated from the Four Plinths located outside Te Papa to their new permanent home in the Wellington Botanic Gardens.

Dunedin’s public art activity has been fairly static for a number of years and it is our intention to increase the opportunities for public art projects to enliven our city.

The commission uses part of the DCC’s Art In Public Places budget of $100,000 which is implemented over a two year cycle, and builds on the city’s previous commissioning policy including the 2008 installation of ‘Kuri/Dog’ by Stephen Mulqueen.

Contact DCC on 477 4000.

Last reviewed: 24 Feb 2010 4:11pm

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

Disclaimer: Elizabeth Kerr is a former member of the DCC Art in Public Places Committee. She resigned from the committee to avoid any potential conflict of interest associated with her views on the stadium project.

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