Tag Archives: Arenas

This is all painfully familiar…

blog.svconline.com

The trials of the Phoenix Coyotes, the least popular hockey team in the NHL, offer a lesson in public debt and defeat.

### theatlantic.com Sep 7 2012, 2:37 PM ET
Business
If You Build It, They Might Not Come: The Risky Economics of Sports Stadiums
By Pat Garofalo and Travis Waldron
In June, the city council of Glendale, Arizona, decided to spend $324 million on the Phoenix Coyotes, an ice hockey team that plays in Glendale’s Jobing.com Arena. The team has been owned by the league itself since its former owner, Jerry Moyes, declared bankruptcy in 2009. For each of the past two seasons, Glendale has paid $25 million to the league to manage the Coyotes, even as the city faced millions of dollars in budget deficits. Now, Greg Jamison, who is also part of the organization that owns the NHL’s San Jose Sharks, is making a bid for the team, and would therefore be the beneficiary of the subsidies.

“Take whatever number the sports promoter says and move the decimal one place to the left. Divide it by ten. That’s a pretty good estimate of the actual economic impact.”

To put the deal in perspective, Glendale’s budget gap for 2012 is about $35 million. As the city voted to give a future Coyotes owner hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars, it laid off 49 public workers, and even considered putting its city hall and police station up as collateral to obtain a loan, according to the Arizona Republic. (The latter plan was ultimately scrapped.) Overall, Glendale is not only on the hook for $15 million per year over two decades to a potential Coyotes owner, but also a $12 million annual debt payment for construction of its arena. In return, according to the Republic, the city receives a measly “$2.2 million in annual rent payments, ticket surcharges, sales taxes and other fees.” Even if the Coyotes were to dominate the league like no other in recent memory and return to the Stanley Cup Finals year after year, the city would still lose $9 million annually.

“It’s kind of a perverse argument that taxpayers should subsidize this because businesses depend on this deal that isn’t viable.”

This is an altogether too common problem in professional sports. Across the country, franchises are able to extract taxpayer funding to build and maintain private facilities, promising huge returns for the public in the form of economic development.
Read more

[Link supplied]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

25 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Business, Construction, Design, Economics, Events, Geography, Media, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Urban design

Wicked tales cont. “Monster Loser Stadiums”

So what’s new?

### http://www.nytimes.com September 7, 2010
Sports
As Stadiums Vanish, Their Debt Lives On
By Ken Belson
It’s the gift that keeps on taking. The old Giants Stadium, demolished to make way for New Meadowlands Stadium, still carries about $110 million in debt, or nearly $13 for every New Jersey resident, even though it is now a parking lot.
New Jerseyans are hardly alone in paying for stadiums that no longer exist. Residents of Seattle’s King County owe more than $80 million for the Kingdome, which was razed in 2000. The story has been similar in Indianapolis and Philadelphia. In Houston, Kansas City, Mo., Memphis and Pittsburgh, residents are paying for stadiums and arenas that were abandoned by the teams they were built for.

How municipalities acquire so much debt on buildings that have been torn down or are underused illustrates the excesses of publicly financed stadiums and the almost mystical sway professional sports teams have over politicians, voters and fans.

Read more

-Jo Craven McGinty and Griff Palmer contributed reporting.

Post by Elizabeth Kerr
Thanks to Janet Gebbie on Facebook’s The DCC has lost the plot. for the reference to this article.

72 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Construction, Design, Economics, Geography, Politics, Project management, Site, Sport, Stadiums

Toyo Ito’s solar powered stadium, Taiwan

This will be old news to some readers, but let’s mark this one again for posterity – compared to how we do things in Dunedin.

“. . . the impressive roof construction that is simultaneously a solar power station.”

### http://www.archiCentral.com 20 May 09
Construction Is finished For Toyo Ito’s Solar Powered Stadium

Construction is finished for Japanese architect Toyo Ito’s solar powered stadium in Taiwan. The stadium’s roof is covered by 8,844 solar panels. The stadium is located in Kaohsiung, Taiwan and it was built to coincide with the opening of the World Games [in July].

The ‘World Games Stadium’ holds 55,000 spectators and it cost $150 million to build. The stadium will hold the record for largest solar-powered stadium in the world with its 14,155m2 roof. It could potentially generate 1.14 Gigawatt hours of electricity every year, enough to power up to 80% of the surrounding neighbourhood.

Read more

highflyerai9 10 April 2008

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

Leave a comment

Filed under Architecture, Construction, Design, Economics, Events, Geography, Inspiration, Politics, Project management, Site, Sport, Stadiums, Town planning

Arena Zagreb, Croatia

From Dezeen this morning: RT @thefabricpress @Dezeen call it a “cats cradle sports arena” http://bit.ly/3iG8Im It resembles what Obelix left of a boar roast…

But check out the multifunctional brief:

### Dezeen November 13th, 2009
Arena Zagreb by UPI-2M
By Rose Etherington

Arena Zagreb in Croatia by architects UPI-2M was awarded Structural Design of the Year at the World Architecture Festival in Barcelona last week.

Arena Zagreb is a multifunctional indoor hall with the footprint of 90340 sq m. It is located in the southwestern part of Zagreb, the capital of Croatia, at one of the main city entrances. Also it lies opposite the popular Zagreb recreation and sports centre Jarun. Arena Zagreb has become a new city emblem on one of its main axes, offering to the citizens a large palette of amusement events.
Read more

Nice 3d swivel (notice all the coach parking):

This video shows the look of Zagreb Arena, the new arena finished in November 2008, a few months before the World Handball Championship in Croatia 2009. The arena is multifunctional, for many sports such as boxing, handball, volleyball, basketball, table tenis, athletics etc. Minimum capacity is 10,000 seats for athletics competitions, and maximum with over 25,000 seats for concerts. For handball matches during the world championship capacity will be around 16,000 seats. –metlazgb 20 July 2007

This shows Arena Zagreb, the building of it, step by step, from the lowest underground parts until the end. –metlazgb 28 November 2008

Slideshow

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

2 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Construction, Design, Project management, Site, Town planning

Architecture ETA 2011

“While architects cannot solve all the world’s ecological problems, we can design energy efficient, socially responsible buildings and we can influence transport patterns through urban planning.”

What else is happening in 2011 besides an ETFE-roofed stadium at Dunedin? This project from Foster + Partners is the first in a series of international building projects What if? will highlight for completion in 2011.

****

Foster + Partners
National Arena Scotland
Glasgow, UK, 2005-2011
Scotland’s National Arena will be an exciting new addition to the expanding cultural and event hub at Glasgow’s Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre. The new Arena will provide an outstanding indoor venue for concerts and performances. A highly flexible building, it is designed to accommodate a wide range of events – from pop concerts to grand theatrical shows.
Slideshow

Architecture and Planning
Foster + Partners’ architecture is driven by the pursuit of quality – a belief that our surroundings directly influence the quality of our lives, whether in the work place, at home or the public spaces in between. It is not just buildings but urban design that affects our well-being. We are concerned with the physical context of a project, sensitive to the culture and climate of their place. We have applied the same priorities to public infrastructure world-wide – in our airports, railway stations, metros, bridges, communication towers, regional plans and city centres. The quest for quality embraces the physical performance of buildings. Link

The way we work
To undertake consistently, in a decade, some of the biggest projects in the world, needs depth of resources. In that sense, ‘size matters’. The practice is more than one thousand strong, with offices in twenty-two countries and a highly talented team drawn from more than fifty nations. However, creativity and personal service are best nurtured by the compact group where ‘small is beautiful’. The resolution of these apparently conflicting ideals is mirrored in the practice’s structure. Link

www.fosterandpartners.com

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

2 Comments

Filed under Architecture, Construction, Design, Economics, Geography, Inspiration, Project management, Town planning