Tag Archives: Architects

Dunedin Railway Station clocktower

### ch9.co.nz July 5, 2012 – 7:06pm
The view from the Railway Station clocktower
The Dunedin Railway Station is an Edwardian monument to the era of rail, and the nineteenth century dreams of the city’s early inhabitants. And inside its clocktower are some very cool spaces the public seldom gets to see. Nine Local News squeezed through some tight manholes and got very dusty to bring those spaces to you.
Video

Image: Channel 9

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New Zealand Architects: Pete Bossley, and Ian and Clare Athfield

### radionz.co.nz Monday 18 June 2012
Nine To Noon with Kathryn Ryan
http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/ninetonoon

Feature Guest – Pete Bossley
Auckland-based architect Pete Bossley last month won the NZ Institute of Architects’ Gold Medal for 2012. The Director of Bossley Architects is best known for his designs for Te Papa, the Voyager Maritime Museum and the McCahon Artist Retreat in Auckland. (34′00″)
Gallery: Architecture by Pete Bossley
Audio | Download: Ogg Vorbis MP3 | Embed

10:40 Book Review – Athfield Architects
Written by Julia Gatley, published by Auckland University Press. Reviewed by Jeremy Hansen. (5′27″)
Audio | Download: Ogg Vorbis MP3 | Embed
http://www.homenewzealand.blogspot.co.nz/

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### radionz.co.nz Saturday 23 June 2012
Saturday Morning with Kim Hill
http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/saturday

10:05 Playing Favourites with Ian and Clare Athfield
Ian and Claire Athfield have been running one of New Zealand’s most celebrated architectural practices for over four decades, and their work is celebrated in a new book and gallery exhibition. (40′57″)
Audio | Download: Ogg Vorbis MP3 | Embed

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

Note: *Radio New Zealand misspells Clare Athfield’s first name as ‘Claire’; the error is repeated in their Urls for the item.

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Damien Hirst goes eco

Ilfracombe, Devon UK

### wired.co.uk 17 February 2012
Business
Damien Hirst to build 500 sustainable homes in Devon
By Duncan Geere
Artist Damien Hirst has announced plans to build 500 homes in Devon that aim to serve as a model for environmental housing across the UK. The houses will be located in Ilfracombe, on land that’s been owned by Hirst for the past 10 years and a pair of nearby farms. Each will be equipped with photovoltaic panels and concealed wind turbines in the roofs, but be designed to complement existing local buildings.
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“You wouldn’t regret this – think of the tourist trade!”

Uploaded by Lordfairling on 6 May 2008

The “Architect Sketch” was first seen in episode 17 of Monty Python’s Flying Circus, “The Buzz Aldrin Show”.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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2011 Southern Architecture Awards – NZ Institute of Architects

### nzia.co.nz 18 Nov 2011
Media Release
Awards signal strong year for Southern architecture
Seventeen projects, ranging in scale from Forsyth Barr Stadium to a weekend retreat at Taieri Mouth, have been recognised in the Southern Architecture Awards, the programme that celebrates the year’s best buildings in Otago and Southland.

“The high number of entries and the high standard of winners are signs that the region’s architects are doing good work in difficult times,” said the convenor of the 2011 Southern Architecture Awards jury, Invercargill architect Brent Knight. “We were impressed by some significant community and public buildings, and found that this was also a very strong year for residential architecture”.

One of the public buildings receiving an Award is Forsyth Barr Stadium, designed by Jasmax, Richard Breslin and Populous. Describing the stadium as “a wonderful place to watch a game”, the Awards jury praised the architects’ skill in dealing with “a complex project involving a large team and a demanding process”.

Another Dunedin public building receiving an award is the Robertson Library at the University of Otago. McCoy and Wixon Architects’ transformation of “an aging institutional structure” has produced “a revitalised library” which is “a very pleasant place to be in”.

Jury convenor Brent Knight said that, as in previous years, a feature of the 2011 Southern Architecture Awards is the quality of residential architecture.

On Dunedin’s sandstone coastal ramparts, South Coast house by Vaughn McQuarrie is “sheltered within cedar-clad pavilions offering spectacular views past dramatic cliff faces to the horizon”, and at Taieri Mouth, McCoy and Wixon Architects’ “bold, geometric” weekend retreat is “a warm and playful house in which the occupants are connected with the landscape and environment”.

Joining Brent Knight on the 2011 Southern Architecture Awards jury were Dunedin architect Tim Heath, Queenstown architect Preston Stevens, and Nelson architect Ian Jack.

The Southern Architecture Awards is a component of the New Zealand Architecture Awards, the official, peer-reviewed awards programme of the New Zealand Institute of Architects (NZIA), the professional body to which 90 per cent of New Zealand’s registered architects belong.

Award winners from the eight branches of the NZIA are eligible for the national level of the awards programme, the New Zealand Architecture Awards. Those awards will be announced on 25 May, 2012.
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██ NZIA 2011 Southern Architecture Awards – winners information, citations and more photos at NZIA website

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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NZIA members on Christchurch City Plan

Architects contribute ‘Early verdicts on the Christchurch draft Central City Plan’ in the latest issue of New Zealand Institute of Architects Cross Section magazine.

Christchurch’s draft Central City Plan, which the [Christchurch City] Council has been pressed to produce with some despatch, has met with a mixed response from local architects. Let’s start with the positive reactions. “The draft Central City Plan is a very good achievement in a short period of time and encapsulates a broad range of ideas and concepts that have been articulated to date,” says Warren and Mahoney’s Peter Marshall. “As a discussion document it will provide the necessary catalyst for a detailed evaluation needed in order to finalise the re-build framework for Christchurch.”

Various positives are expressed in reaction to Volume 1, followed by ‘criticalities’ and ‘explosions’ lobbed at the constraints of Volume 2.

A common critical theme is that the draft Plan is, in the words of Ian Athfield, “extremely prescriptive”, and that the regulatory regime revealed in Volume 2 would be inimical to the city’s recovery. “There are issues… that are going to need a more careful examination to ensure the urban design attributes do not compromise commercial realities,” says Peter Marshall. Peter’s remarks are a judicious expression of opinions that seem to be widely held by Christchurch architects.

“The more I look into Volume 2 the more concerned I get,” says Jasper van der Lingen (Sheppard & Rout Architects, and chair of the NZIA’s Canterbury branch). “Some examples: Volume 1 says you can get extra height for good urban design and a green building. Volume 2 translates this into mandating that a building owner must employ a green building council professional – bureaucracy and cost – and good urban design translates into a pitched roof between 30 and 60 degrees. Volume 1 talks about safety through passive surveillance. Volume 2 translates this into ridiculous rules about how much glazing you must have. Volume 1 talks about good scale of retail. Volume 2 translates this into a maximum size of retail of 250 square metres – no Ballantynes or Farmers. Volume 2 has some terrible stuff about blank façades that looks a lot worse than the old residential 20 metre rule, and it determines where neighbourhood centres should go without consultation with the local community – in dumb places, in my opinion.”

“There will be capital flight if this goes through unaltered,” Jasper says. “Volume 1 was a pass and appears to be written by designers. Volume 2 is a big fail and appears to be written by planners. It’s a huge worry for the future of Christchurch. The NZIA has a lot of work to do to fight this.”

It’s only a DRAFT. Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Architecture and Design: harnessing the collaborative energy

### places.designobserver.com Posted 16.09.11
The Art of Advocacy: The Museum as Design Laboratory
By Barry Bergdoll
Since 2007, when I ventured out of the academy to take the reins of the Department of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art, we have traversed an unexpected set of economic, social and environmental challenges in which the centrality of the design professions has become manifestly clear, even as larger forces — in which designers are too often complicit — act to marginalise the disciplines of architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, design and the fine arts.

The neologism “starchitect” has lost much of its lustre…

Having worked side-by-side with diverse professionals, I am more than ever convinced that a cooperative, multidisciplinary approach is fundamental to the future vitality of the field — and essential if designers are to contribute to solving the enormous problems of our day. At MoMA we have been trying to discover meaningful positions and prospects even as practitioners have been jolted into discussion of just where the moral compass should be set.
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Another outrage of trite ill-informed force of change: Maltexo, Ward St

Another horny tale. Yes, the complete failure of a developer to carry out ANY heritage building assessment for the industrial site that would have told him which valuable components to retain on site, for good stewardship of the Dunedin harbourside’s architectural character and integrity.

The developer says he has spoken to architects – he might have. The question is which ones – no architects currently working out of Dunedin have the professional accreditation necessary to offer a heritage assessment or building conservation advice – plenty of the local boys need work.

The Maltexo sign, while iconic, is paint on a simple brick wall of a simple shed (a simple feature to retain and keep maintained in situ if desired); however, it is NOT the most valuable architectural historical component to be retained on site – the frontage of the gabled building immedately south of the sign on Ward St, is.

To a lesser extent, a small number of brick sheds to the rear of the site, in fair to reasonable condition, could have been architecturally integrated into any new industrial complex.

Mr Barnes can file his comments where the sun doesn’t shine.

“Key to the industrial area is revitalising these sites … This is a cornerstone, modern, highly visible site which is what businesses are looking for.” –Chris Barnes, developer

### ODT Online Mon, 25 Apr 2011
$2 million business park by end of the year
By Simon Hartley
A $2 million business park is due to be completed in Dunedin by the end of the year. It will be built on land now occupied by the former Maltexo factory, which is scheduled for demolition. Last November, Dunedin property investor Chris Barnes bought the lessee’s interest in the site, on the corner of Ward and Halsey Sts, with the deal to be closed on completion of demolition; scheduled by June 30.
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Don’t you love a man of largesse. We should be pleased?
Lest we forget, thanks too, to Port Otago Limited and its subsidiary Chalmers Properties’ current property manager.

Related Posts and Comments:
6.2.11 Hurt Inside [photographs]
27.1.11 Good-bye to MALTEXO, Ward Street – Dunedin Harbourside

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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The proactive heritage development lobby EXISTS in Dunedin

Some say if we want to get serious about preserving heritage buildings, then maybe we are going to have to rethink how we go about paying for it. Others say if you buy a heritage building, then you should be prepared for what it might cost you and stop complaining. ODT

Allied Press Building. Image ©2011 Elizabeth Kerr

### ODT Online Mon, 21 Feb 2011
Refurbishing a numbers game
By Debbie Porteous
Everyone loves to see a historic building refurbished and in use, but there are inevitable hurdles to such renovation and reuse, especially when they involve buildings less fabled or publicly admired . . . From the point of view of people involved with redeveloping heritage buildings, the major impediment to redevelopment certainly appears to be the costs.
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Other stories:
Two perspectives on the Dunedin heritage buildings – Lois Galer & Robert Clark
South Dunedin highlights heritage
Dunedin chef puts to sea to make ends meet

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Rolling stock – THINK multiple New Zealand applications

Hello Hillside Engineering Group…

### dezeen.com Wednesday, 22 December 2010 at 3:22 pm
A Rolling Masterplan by Jagnefalt Milton
Posted by Rose Etherington
Buildings roll through the city on railway tracks in this masterplan by Swedish architects Jagnefalt Milton for Åndalsnes in Norway. Called A Rolling Masterplan, the design was created for a competition to design a masterplan for the city. Jagnefalt Milton’s scheme would use both existing and new railway tracks to move buildings around according to the seasons or events. Their proposal included a mobile hotel, swimming pool and concert hall.

The Swedish architecture office Jagnefalt Milton has been awarded in the Norwegian master plan competition for the city of Åndalsnes. The jury was impressed by the Swedes’ proposals that did not propose new city blocks, public squares, boardwalks etcetera, but instead focused entirely on the existing rail road network and created something unexpected from it. They were also moved by the presentation material which they thought had a surreal mood with a magic and Tarkovsky-esk atmosphere that contrasted well with the sober and technical plans and axonometric drawings.

Jagnefält Milton is an architecture office in Stockholm, Sweden. Their last achievement was a first prize in the architecture competition to build a culture centre in the city of Galway, Ireland. The office was founded a year ago by Konrad Milton and Carl Jägnefält.
Read more + Images

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See also:

### dezeen.com Monday, 19 November 2007 at 12:06 am
Rolling Huts by Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects
Posted by Marcus Fairs

Rolling Huts are minimally appointed mountain cabins mounted on wheels, designed by Seattle architects Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen. Located at Mazama in Washington State, the six huts serve as guest accommodation for friends of architect Tom Kundig, who has his Delta Shelter weekend retreat in the valley nearby. The cabins have wheels to get round local planning laws forbidding permanent structures.
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UNStudio

UNStudio (formerly Van Berkel en Bos Architectenbureau) is a Dutch architectural practice specialising in architecture, urban development and “infrastructural” projects.

The practice was founded in 1998 by Ben van Berkel and Caroline Bos. The initials “UN” stand for United Network, a reference to the collaborative nature of the practice comprising individuals from various countries with backgrounds and technical training in numerous fields.

UNStudio has an average work-force of 100 employees and a management team made up of two directors and three partners, Harm Wassink, Gerard Loozekoot and Astrid Piber. Architects such as Winy Maas and Jacob van Rijs (who helped found MVRDV) have worked at the firm.

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[12 hours ago]
UNStudio’s SUTD campus proposal will promote green learning
Architects at UNStudio and DP Architects have been selected to develop Plot A of the Singapore University of Technology and Design campus, which will be located on a site of 76,846sqm close to the Changi airport and Changi Business Park. The new campus has been designed to act as a catalyst and conveyor for advancement and bringing together people, ideas and innovation.
Read more at Ecofriend

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www.unstudio.com > news

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University stadium building (Phase 1)

### ODT Online Tue, 9 Nov 2010
University stadium building rises from the dust
By David Loughrey
The Oamaru stone-clad building is expected to house a new Unipol student gymnasium and recreation centre, the Foundation Studies language centre and foundation-year programme, and a cafe for staff, students and the public.
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Otara Simple House

### ODT Online Fri, 22 Oct 2010
Government opens its first ‘simple’ house
The Government has opened its first “simple house” today – its answer to streamlining the design and build process to allow first-time home buyers affordable housing. Building and Construction Maurice Williamson opened the house designed by Stephen Smith and built by Housing New Zealand in the south Auckland suburb of Otara. Mr Smith’s design won the Starter Home Design Competition run by the Department of Building and Housing. NZPA
Read more + Photos

s3architects – DBH Starter Home, Preston Rd

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### nzherald.co.nz 5:11 PM Friday Oct 22, 2010
A new era in affordable housing
A spokesperson for housing New Zealand told NZPA the home would cost $1835 per sq metre (including GST) and assumed that the section was ready to build on. NZPA
Link + 2 Photos

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University phase 1 building

### ODT Online Thu, 26 Aug 2010
Stadium Uni building not ready for Cup
By Allison Rudd
The University of Otago’s building at the Forsyth Barr Stadium will only be partially completed by next year’s Rugby World Cup. While the exterior would be finished by August, the month before the event starts, the internal fit-out was not expected to be completed until December, university property services stadium project manager Jamie Cargill said yesterday. That meant the building – which would house a new Unipol student gymnasium and recreation centre, the Foundation Studies language centre and foundation year programme, and a cafe for staff, students and the public – would look finished during the World Cup as interior work continued, he said.
Read more

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We understand the building doesn’t address the university’s Critical Space Plan, “an accelerated capital works programme valued at around $140 million”. “The plan was produced by the Property Services team in conjunction with the academic divisions to address the current and future space needs of staff and students.”
http://www.propserv.otago.ac.nz/about/

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Norman Foster, [A]rchitect

As the great British architect Norman Foster turns 75, he talks to Jonathan Glancey about flying cars, his new underground city – and how he beat bowel cancer.

### guardian.co.uk Tuesday 29 June 2010 21.31 BST
Norman Foster at 75: Norman’s conquests
By Jonathan Glancey
“The other day,” says Norman Foster, “I was counting the number of aircraft I’ve flown: from sailplanes and a Spitfire to a Cessna Citation. By chance, it comes to 75.” So Foster, who turned 75 this month, has decided to make models of all 75, to hang in his own personal museum, which he keeps at his Swiss home, an 18th-century chateau set in vineyards between Lausanne and Geneva.
These model aircraft will hover over his collection of some of the 20th-century’s greatest machines, cherished for both their engineering brilliance and streamlined beauty; many of them look like winged or wheeled versions of Foster’s most innovative buildings. “At the moment,” says the architect, “I’m restoring a Citroën Sahara, designed to tackle north African dunes. I’m also thinking of getting a Bell 47 helicopter as a focal point. And I’ve had a model made of the Graf Zeppelin airship.”
The subject [architecture] is too often treated as a fine art, delicately wrapped in mumbo-jumbo. In reality, it’s an all-embracing discipline taking in science, art, maths, engineering, climate, nature, politics, economics. Every time I’ve flown an aircraft, or visited a steelworks, or watched a panel-beater at work, I’ve learned something new that can be applied to buildings.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Global construction industry: New Zealand chances to rebuild its wool industry

THANK GOD THE LIGHT IS SEEN. For 15 years or more our sheep’s wool has foundered on the back of zero marketing and collapsing management of the industry sector. Global customers with the smarts to use sustainable products in their building design and fitouts ARE WHO WE WANT. The fact that New Zealand and ‘allied’ international wool producers failed to reverse the drafting of building specification standards almost universally favouring the use of synthetics is UNFATHOMABLE, but it happened. Have to change the (global) rules, grow our sheep numbers again, and start rigorously processing and trading natural wool products!

### ODT Online Mon, 12 Apr 2010
Exposing architects to virtues of wool
By Neal Wallace
Thirteen of the world’s leading architects will be exposed to the virtues of wool during a week-long visit to the South Island. The architects will be shown the merits of wool, visit farms, absorb South Island scenery and then follow the fibre from the sheep’s back to finished products before being tasked with designing a hotel which makes maximum use of wool in every aspect of the building.

The project was part of the International Wool Textile Organisation’s international wool promotion programme and was mostly funded by the National Council of New Zealand Wool Interests (NCNZWI).

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Stadium designers justify the unjustifiable

### ODT Online Thu, 4 Mar 2010
Stadium designers explain their vision
By David Loughrey
It may not be a surprise they hold these views – they did, after all, design the Forsyth Barr Stadium – but Richard Breslin and Marko den Breems think the building near Dunedin’s waterfront is a winner. David Loughrey talks to the two men who took the stadium from an idea to a reality.

Worldwide, stadiums attract the same kind of controversy that has dogged the Dunedin example, with public funding of facilities worth hundreds of millions of dollars often unpopular with the ratepayers or taxpayers, who end up footing the bill.

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Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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Christmas

Wishing all What if? readers and posters Merry Christmas and a Happy 2010. And a super large thankyou to Paul Le Comte for indulging our views and debate !!

### Dezeen December 24th, 2009 at 9:36 pm
Designer Christmas cards
By Rose Etherington
Here’s a selection of our favourite Christmas e-cards sent in by designers and photographers.
Read more

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Tweets

10PARK @TokyoFashion Thanks for all the great shots this year and especially the Christmas 2009 Tokyo (Set) http://bit.ly/6hSmBl

[or watch slideshow]

TokyoFashion @10PARK Thanks very much! I hope I can get the remaining two sets posted before the end of Christmas day. Too much to do! :-)

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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UNStudio – Dalian Football Stadium, Dalian, China, 2009

### Arch Daily 07 Oct 2009
New Dalian Shide FC Stadium / UNStudio
By Karen Cilento
After winning a limited competition, UNStudio will move forward with their design of a 38,500 m2 stadium for the Dalian Shide FC, China’s most successful club in the Chinese Super League. The new stadium will be located in the Shide’s hometown of Dalian, on the southern tip of Liaodong peninsula.

Working with the idea of layering and overlapping, an aesthetic deeply rooted in ancient Chinese cuju football, Ben van Berkel has created a stadium where the articulation of the structure and its openings and overlapping moments serve as “the starting point for visitor experience”.
The stadium will accommodate approximately 40,000 spectators in addition to providing areas for TV broadcasting, administration, VIP lounge, players’ facilities and two training fields. A public concourse in a layered envelope extends on ground level to provide outdoor public areas that rest above the parking facilities.
Read more + photos

█ UNStudio website http://www.unstudio.com/

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Former Logan Park Art Gallery talks

This week (ODT 5.10.09), reporter Chris Morris highlighted the Dunedin City Council proposal to remove the former art gallery building from the edge of the University Oval cricket ground in Dunedin. Councillors attending the community development committee meeting on Tuesday considered a report on the removal of the former gallery building in the closed section of the meeting. ODT Link

Note: Removal of the building is only one of the options on the council table.

Let’s not forget that current use of Logan Park itself includes active and passive recreation; this should not be lost sight of in any new development plans for ‘organised sport’ at the park.

Further, there’s no good reason to cut down the avenue of mature trees on Logan Park Drive.

Maintaining a watching brief… After all, this council of its own volition suddenly ‘closed’ a public road (again) this week – John Wilson Ocean Drive – upsetting citizens. The story broke on Channel 9 news on 6 October, with follow up the next day in Otago Daily Times.

Oh, and… A fence at Lawyers Head? Get real. What about coastal landscape values – I’ll say it, views to die for must be maintained and access not obstructed.

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Entry on Heritage New Zealand’s List:

Exhibition Art Gallery (Former)
40 Logan Park Drive, DUNEDIN

List No: 2149

Registration Type: Historic Place – Category I
Region: Otago Region
Date Registered: 30/06/2006
City/District Council: Dunedin City Council

Other Names: Dunedin Art Gallery, Dunedin Public Art Gallery (Former), Logan Park Art Gallery, New Zealand and South Seas Exhibition Art Gallery (Former), NZ and South Seas Exhibition Art Gallery (Former), Old Art Gallery

Status Explanation: Review of registration confirmed BD2006/06/24.

Links: http://whc.unesco.org/archive/advisory_body_evaluation/1131.pdf – Royal Exhibition Building Australia No.1131, p.20

Brief History: The Exhibition Art Gallery was built as the art gallery for the 1925 New Zealand and South Seas International Exhibition in Dunedin. The World Fairs and Exhibitions were among the largest gatherings of people of all time, and they ranked amongst the most important events held in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Most exhibition buildings and sites were designed to be temporary, and there are, therefore, relatively few structures remaining. The Gallery appears to be the only surviving in situ exhibition building from any of the exhibitions held in New Zealand, and is also a significant survivor in the international history of exhibitions. This gives the Gallery outstanding historical significance.

The Gallery was designed by prominent Dunedin architect Edmund Anscombe (1874-1948). Anscombe was the originator of the idea to hold the exhibition in Dunedin, and was appointed official architect to the Exhibition committee in June 1924. Anscombe designed and supervised the lay out and construction of all seven of the exhibition pavilions. The building was symmetrically laid out with a large central exhibition hall from which two ambulatory circuits via the ten smaller galleries on either side of it were accessed. Each gallery was linked to its neighbour via decorative plaster archways.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Architects for university stadium buildings

### ODT Online Thu, 27 Aug 2009
Stadium buildings architect named
By David Loughrey

The University of Otago has appointed architects for stage one of its $50 million development at the Forsyth Barr Stadium, but construction will not start until after the realignment of State Highway 88 away from Anzac Ave has been confirmed. Warren and Mahoney will take on the project, with McCoy and Wixon assisting.
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A little respect please

Meg Davidson was doing HOK Sport Architects, the Carisbrook Stadium Trust and the public of Dunedin a massive disservice in her letter to the editor, ‘Architecture rethink best for stadium’ (ODT 22.8.08).

She claimed that the options for redevelopment of the old Carisbrook were passed over as in her words, ‘asking HOK if you need a new stadium is like asking a barber if you need a haircut’.

Several points; despite what has falsely been claimed by the opponents of the new stadium, several upgrade options for the old stadium were considered. This included partial and full upgrades. These were considered and dismissed as not meeting the full needs of the city in the future. If they were to go ahead Architects would still have been employed.

Second, despite the somewhat ‘awestruck’ view the STS thinks the Carisbrook Stadium Trust has of HOK Sport, they are paid to do whatever job they choose to take on. If the CST asked them to add a dunny out the back of the terraces, if they were inclined that is what they would have produced. The client, with the dollars, has the final say.

Funny this so-called ‘increase in plan B’ seems actually only to be coming from certain quarters of the community with the badge STS pinned on.

But then like elections I can see the blur and smudge campaign swinging iron to full effect. Two negative opinion pieces in two days, and not one of them based on the facts as they stand.

I wonder what’s in tomorrow’s paper ‘Otago won’t play in new stadium’?

Posted by Paul Le Comte

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