Tag Archives: Architects

ODT feature : Streets of gold #Dunedin

In case you missed the ODT four-part series on Dunedin’s residential heritage in late December….. here it is, via Dave Cannan’s The Wash (Facebook).




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█ The four parts, abridged for quick reference and linked here below, had an excellent (research) information follow-up by Kim Dungey.

Some very approximate dates have been added care of Quality Value (QV), these are based on (limited) property records held by councils; as well as year dates for historical architects, where known.

Streets of Gold, a Summer Times series celebrating Dunedin’s rich architectural heritage. In collaboration with Heritage New Zealand researchers Heather Bauchop and Susan Irvine, with additional research by David Murray, archivist, Hocken Collections; and Alison Breese, archivist, Dunedin City Council.

### ODT Online Tue, 27 Dec 2016
Streets of gold: High St
High Street has an association with the medical profession dating back to the 1880s, when the Mornington cable car started running and some impressive new houses were built along its route.

CAVENDISH CHAMBERS, 211 High St.
The company behind the venture, Medical Buildings Ltd, was incorporated on March 1, 1926, and the shareholders all took professional rooms in the new property. The building was completed in 1927. Architect: Eric Miller (1896-1948).

236 HIGH ST
This prominent residence (QV: c.1900?) with a turret and projecting windows was designed in 1888 for Scottish-born Dr Frank Ogston. Ogston gained his medical degree in Aberdeen and emigrated to Dunedin in 1886 to take up a position as a lecturer in medical jurisprudence and hygiene at the University of Otago. Architect: Henry Hardy (1830-1908), and builder-developer.

238 HIGH ST
An Arts and Crafts-style design, the house (QV: c.1909?) is finished in roughcast with brick exposed on the ground floor sills. It was built for Dr D.E. Williams and his family as a private residence and doctor’s surgery and was home to the Williams family until the 1960s. Architect: Basil Hooper (1876-1960).

296 HIGH ST
Built in 1904, the Chalet Hospital (a private facility) was described as being “finished in coloured and tuck-pointed brickwork … the whole of the relief and ornament is carried out in bold cornices over the windows”. Architect: John Louis Salmond (1868-1950).

Read more + Photos

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### ODT Online Tue, 27 Dec 2016
Streets of gold: York Pl
York Place features two large homes once owned by members of the Speight family.

LARBERT VILLA – 371 York Pl
It is unclear exactly when the villa was built. Coppersmith Alexander Burt, of A and T Burt, married Janet Crawford in 1866 (they had a family of six sons and three daughters) and the couple were living in York Pl by July 1868 when Janet gave birth to a son at the house.

FORMER SPEIGHT RESIDENCE – 362 York Pl
Built for Jessie and Charles Speight after their marriage in 1898, the residence appears in the Dunedin City Council rates records in the 1899-1900 year. Architect: J.L. Salmond.

HAEATA – 273 York Pl
The residence of Charles and Jessie Speight from the time it was built in 1915, it remained in the Speight family until 1960. Bearing a strong resemblance to the Theomin family’s Olveston (built 1907, designed by Sir Ernest George). Architect: John Brown (1875-1923), a neighbour.

MRS TURNBULL’S GROCERY STORE – 324 York Pl
Known more than a century ago as Mrs Turnbull’s Grocery Store, this unusual wedge-shaped building began life as a home, stables and shop built for John and Janet Turnbull in 1875. In January 1875 tenders were invited for a two-storey dwelling and shop to be constructed of wood. Architect and Surveyor: E.J. Sanders [aka Saunders].

Read more + Photos

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### ODT Online Wed, 28 Dec 2016
Streets of gold: Highgate
Highgate has a fascinating and storied collection of prominent dwellings.

RENFREW HOUSE – 111 Highgate
Thought to have originated as a single-storey bluestone house with a central front door and double hung windows on each side. A second storey was later added. The exterior walls were built of double stone – more than 70cm thick – and the interior walls of double brick. With its wrought iron lacework, it has been described as one of the “finest examples of classic Victorian architecture in Dunedin”. Home of businessman Andrew McFarlane (1842-1904) and his wife Jane Wilson (1847-1920). By the 1890s, the family referred to their home as “Renfrew House”. Architect: credited to Nathaniel Wales (1832-1903), a neighbour.
 
KAWARAU – 204 Highgate
Designed in 1900 for dredging tycoon Alexander McGeorge, this grand residence reflects the fortunes made in Otago’s gold dredging boom of the late 1890s and early 20th century. Trained at Dunedin firm Cossens and Black, McGeorge (1868-1953) held a variety of significant engineering posts. The two-storeyed house is built of brick, has a slate roof, ornate decorative detailing, and features Tudor influences in the half timbering and veranda details. Architect: J.L. Salmond.

FORMER HUXTABLE RESIDENCE – 233 Highgate
This 1907 brick and tile residence designed for Anna and Alexander Huxtable, is a beautifully detailed example of an Edwardian villa, one with historic and architectural significance. Anna Huxtable was granted the land in 1907; a survey on May 15, 1907, indicates the foundations for the new dwelling were already in place at that date. (QV: c.1910?). Alexander Murray Huxtable described himself as both a commercial agent and patent medicine manufacturer. Architect: Edward Walden (1870-1944).

MELROSE – 384 Highgate
Likely designed for lawyer Arthur Nation (1852-1927) around 1876. In October that year, tenders were called for the construction of a “brick cottage” in the suburb of Melrose (a private subdivision in what is now known as Roslyn). However, Nation appears to have built more than a cottage: when his property was offered for sale in 1879 it was described as “a substantially-built and well-finished brick house”, its original features including hand-painted ceilings, timber joinery and stained glass. Architect: credited to John McGregor (1838-1911), and harbour engineer.

Read more + Photos

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### ODT Online Thu, 29 Dec 2016
Streets of gold: Royal Tce
Royal Terrace has a fascinating and storied collection of prominent dwellings.

DAISY BANK – 12 Royal Tce
Associated with the prominent Hudson family. An Italianate, two-storeyed symmetrical house with a large basement, “Daisy Bank” was built of concrete and wood, circa 1897. Architect: J.A. Burnside (1856-1920).

LINDEN – 22 Royal Tce
Built in the 1870s, a two-storied, two-bay Victorian residence of more than 15 rooms, with an exterior comprising plastered triple brick with quoins, foundations of Leith Valley andesite and a slate roof. Associated with the prominent Isaacs and Hudson families. Architect: Mason and Wales (likely Nathaniel Wales).

CLAVERTON – 30 Royal Tce
Associated with prominent local politician and businessman Richard H. Leary and one of New Zealand’s most prominent artistic families, the Hodgkins. Claverton was most likely built in 1877 by local politician and businessman Richard H. Leary (1840-95). Architect: likely Maxwell Bury (1825-1912).

ALYTH – 34 Royal Tce
Built in the 1870s by prominent businessman, community leader and one-time Dunedin mayor Keith Ramsay (1844-1906). Named Alyth after Ramsay’s birth place, the house was completed, at the latest, by March 1875. Architect: Robert Arthur Lawson (1833-1902).

Read more + Photos

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It doesn’t have to be a mansion located on the high streets….

crabapple-cottage-otago-peninsula-thecuriouskiwi-co-nzCrabapple Cottage, Otago Peninsula [thecuriouskiwi.co.nz]

Lastly, a THOROUGHLY USEFUL guide for those unfamiliar with historic heritage archives, technical sources and search methods.

### ODT Online Fri, 30 Dec 2016
What is your house hiding?
By Kim Dungey
Enjoyed this week’s Streets of Gold series, in which we have profiled various Dunedin houses of historic significance? Fancy playing detective and tracing the history of your home? … In recent years, Heritage New Zealand has run “how to research your home” workshops in Dunedin, Invercargill, Oamaru and Central Otago. The popular seminars have drawn together the sources it uses every day to tell the story of historic places. Archivists say some people want to restore their homes to their original states, are curious about former owners or simply want to know the age of their houses for insurance purposes. Others require archaeological assessments of pre-1901 properties or have reported seeing ghosts in their homes and wanted to work out who they might be. Interested homeowners have a wealth of resources at their fingertips….
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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Dame Zaha Hadid 1950 – 2016

Zaha Hadid by Philip Sinden (1)

Zaha Hadid by Mary McCartney [dezeen.com] 1

31 March 2016 | Miami
The acclaimed Iraqi-British architect Zaha Hadid, the first female winner of the top Pritzker Architecture Prize, has died at the age of 65. Born in Baghdad in October 31, 1950, Hadid first studied mathematics at the American University in Lebanon, before pursuing architecture at the Architectural Association in London in 1972. In 1979, she established her own practice in London, the Zaha Hadid Architects.

Last year it was announced that British architect Zaha Hadid was to become the 2016 recipient of the Royal Gold Medal for architecture, marking the first time a woman has won the prize in her own right. Awarded by the Royal Institute of British Architects, the medal is presented annually in recognition of a significant contribution to the profession. Hadid is the first women without a male partner to win the award in its 167-year history. Hadid said she was proud to be the first woman to receive the honour in her own right. “We now see more established female architects all the time. That doesn’t mean it’s easy,” she said.

Necessarily having to disperse effort through a studio production, rather than being a lone artist, she cottoned on to the potential of the computer to turn space upon itself. So Zaha with her mathematics background seized upon this, she has been smart enough to pull in some formidable computational talent without being phased by its ways. Meanwhile, with paintings and special small drawings Zaha continued to lead from the front. Read more at Dezeen

Rosey Chan Published on Sep 28, 2013
“Parametricism” by Patrik Schumacher – Zaha Hadid Architects – AADRL
Music by Rosey Chan – entirely recorded on acoustic piano + prepared piano

Dezeen Published on Dec 2, 2015
Zaha Hadid unveils prefabricated Volu dining pavilion at Design Miami
Architects Zaha Hadid and Patrik Schumacher have designed a dining pavilion shaped like an open clam shell.

Zaha Hadid Architects http://www.zaha-hadid.com
An international architecture and design firm founded by Zaha Hadid, with its main office situated in Clerkenwell, London. We work at all scales and in all sectors. We create transformative cultural, corporate, residential and other spaces that work in synchronicity with their surroundings.
950 projects 44 countries 400 staff 55 nations | About us 1 year ago

Architecture Today Published on Mar 21, 2016
Library and Learning Center – Campus WU / Zaha Hadid Architects
Project Development and Structural Engineering: Vasko + Partner Ingenieure (Vienna). Video by Damir Kovačić, for the video exhibition series Austrian Architecture Today. Music: The Jazz Piano – Artist: Ben Sound

ArchiveTecture Published on Oct 27, 2015
Abu Dhabi Performing Arts Centre by Zaha Hadid
A new performing arts centre housing five theatres, music hall, concert hall and opera house – conceived as a sculptural form, emerging naturally from the intersection of pedestrian pathways within a new cultural district – a growing organism that spreads through successive branches which form the structure like ‘fruits on the vine’.

SOHO China Published on Oct 8, 2014
The Story of Wangjing SOHO: Exclusive Dialogue with Zhang Xin and Zaha Hadid
SOHO China’s Wangjing SOHO, designed by Pritzker Prize winning architect Dame Zaha Hadid opened 20 September 2014, with over 20,000 visitors to Beijing’s newest architectural landmark. In a live dialogue, SOHO China CEO Zhang Xin interviews Pritzker-winning architect Dame Zaha Hadid to uncover the inspiration her design language.

SOHO China Published on May 27, 2014
Musical Interlude at Wangjing SOHO 望京SOHO水景巅峰之境
This video highlights the spectacular water features and landscape design of one of Beijing’s newest landmark architectures. Wangjing SOHO, designed by world-renowned architect Zaha Hadid, covers an area of 115,392 sq metres with a total construction area of 521,265 sq metres, and is comprised of three highrise mixed-use office and commercial buildings, and three lowrise commercial buildings, the tallest tower having a height of 200 metres. Upon completion of construction in 2014, Wangjing SOHO will be the first tall landmark architecture visible en route from the airport into the city.

ARk1T3CH Published on Jan 2, 2014
Who Dares Wins • Zaha Hadid
BBC Scotland [2013] – Español CC (duration 1:10:39)
█ [profile interview and backstory]

Dezeen Published on Aug 14, 2015
Zaha Hadid wins contest for landmark bridge across Taipei’s Tamsui River
This animation by MIR and Morean shows Zaha Hadid Architects’ proposal for a 920-metre-long bridge across the mouth of the Tamsui River in the Taiwanese capital. Billed as “the world’s largest asymmetric cable-stayed bridge with a single tower”, the Danjiang Bridge will be supported by just one 175-metre-high concrete mast to reduce its visual impact on the Taipei skyline. Its steel deck will create a new route for cars, trains and pedestrians, easing congestion on existing transport networks. Zaha Hadid Architects – which has previously completed bridges in Spain and Abu Dhabi – is partnering with engineer Sinotech Engineering Consultants and master builder Leonhardt, Andrä & Partner on the project. Read more at Dezeen

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Portraits: Zaha Hadid – Philip Sinden | Mary McCartney

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Dezeen: W57 —West 57th Residential Building by BIG

Durst Fetner Residential commissioned Copenhagen based BIG in the spring of 2010 to introduce a new residential typology to Manhattan.

sltube7 Uploaded on Feb 10, 2011
Jacob Slevin Bjarke Ingels Is BIG in New York City with W57
(by Designer Pages)

GlessnerGroup Uploaded on Feb 15, 2011
W57 – West 57th Residential Building [no audio]
W57 is a hybrid between the European perimeter block and a traditional Manhattan high-rise, West 57th has a unique shape which combines the advantages of both: the compactness and efficiency of a courtyard building providing density, a sense of intimacy and security, with the airiness and the expansive views of a skyscraper.
©Glessner Group, Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG)

Construction is due for completion in 2016.

█ Architect: Bjarke Ingels Group

### dezeen.com Tue, 8 Feb 2011 at 12:41 pm
West 57th by BIG
By Catherine Warmann
Durst Fetner Residential (DFR) today announced the design of West 57, a 600-unit 80/20 residential building on West 57th Street between 11th and 12th Avenues. The building is designed by renowned Danish Architect firm BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group and is their inaugural North American project. The building’s program consists of over 600 residential units of different scales situated on a podium with a cultural and commercial program. The building will strive for LEED Gold Certification.

“It’s extraordinarily exciting to build a building whose architecture will attract visitors from around the globe,” said Hal Fetner, CEO of Durst Fetner Residential. “BIG’s design is innovative, evocative and unique and the building’s beauty is matched only by its efficient and functional design that preserves existing view corridors while maximizing the new building’s access to natural light and views of the Hudson River. West 57th will establish a new standard for architectural excellence and its creative design, sustainable-construction and operations, breathtaking views and distinctive amenities will make it New York’s most sought after residential address.”

dzn_West-57th-by-BIG-22dzn_West-57th-by-BIG-23

“New York is rapidly becoming an increasingly green and livable city. The transformation of the Hudson River waterfront and the Highline into green parks, the ongoing effort to plant a million trees, the pedestrianisation of Broadway and the creation of more miles of bicycle lanes than the entire city of my native Copenhagen are all evidence of urban oases appearing all over the city. With West 57th we attempt to continue this transformation into the heart of the city fabric – into the centre of a city block,” Bjarke Ingels, Founder, BIG.

“The building is conceived as a cross breed between the Copenhagen courtyard and the New York skyscraper. The communal intimacy of the central urban oasis meets the efficiency, density and panoramic views of the tall tower in a new hybrid typology. The courtyard is to architecture what Central Park is to urbanism: a giant green garden surrounded by a dense wall of spaces for living.”
Read more + Images

[view full screen]

BIG from DRKHRSE (posted 4 months ago)
An aerial view of Bjarke Ingel’s newest building in NYC, at W57

█ Drone Photography: Darkhorse

### dezeen.com Wed, 16 Sept 2015 at 11:10 am
Drone video shows progress on New York “courtscraper” by BIG
By Jenna McKnight
Communications firm Darkhorse has used a camera mounted to a drone to capture footage of Via 57 West, the residential building by Bjarke Ingels Group that is now rising in New York. Construction is underway on the tetrahedron-shaped building, which is located on West 57th Street in Midtown Manhattan. The design is pulled up at one corner, to create a 467-foot-tall (142-metre) structure. It topped out several months ago, with the addition of the final structural beam, and work is now continuing on the building’s facades. The unofficial movie by Darkhorse shows images of Via’s sloped exterior, which is punctuated with south-facing terraces that look toward the Hudson River.

dzn_West-57th-by-BIG-36BIG-West-57-project-New-York-City_dezeen_sq

Encompassing 861,00 square feet (80,000 square metres), the building will contain 709 residential units and a large central courtyard. The project also calls for retail space totalling 45,000 square feet (4,180 square metres).

“We call it a courtscraper,” Ingels told Dezeen in an interview last year. “It’s a combination of a skyscraper and a courtyard building. One side is the height of a handrail and the other side is the height of a high-rise.”

The project is being constructed in an area with a mix of building types. W57 is sandwiched between a power plant, a sanitation garage and a highway. The building’s amenities will include a pool, fitness centre, basketball court, golf simulator, library and screening room. Residents will also be able to reserve “living rooms” for entertaining that feature fireplaces, chef’s kitchens, dining rooms and large terraces.
Read more + Images

dzn_West-57th-by-BIG-401dzn_West-57th-by-BIG-38

█ Other residential projects now underway in New York include 152 Elizabeth Street by Tadao Ando in the Nolita neighbourhood, 520 West 28th Street by Zaha Hadid near the High Line, and a luxury condo building by Alvaro Siza that is slated to rise near BIG’s Via 57 West.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Uglies: Black-tie at 715 George

Habitable rooms, 715 George St cnr Regent Rd blot 1715 George St, corner Regent Rd, Dunedin

█ Clan Construction Commercial Ltd
http://www.companies.govt.nz/co/4013678

### ODT Online Thu, 10 Dec 2015
Student apartments going up
Construction has begun on six new student apartments at the corner of George St and Regent Rd, Dunedin. The 962sq m triangular-shaped site is owned by Straits International Ltd, and was the site of a service station for about 80 years. The Dunedin City Council has given resource consent for the company to construct four residential units in a two-storey building (block 1) and two residential units in a three-storey building (block 2), thereby creating 22 habitable rooms. Construction is expected to be completed next year.
ODT Link

Comments at ODT Online:

Student apartments
Submitted by Barnaby on Thu, 10/12/2015 – 6:35pm.

No! This was not a service station site for 80 years. There was a beautiful two-storey substantial brick heritage house on this site until about the 1970s. This is just another step in the incremental loss of North End heritage. This shows very poor planning from DCC, making this part of town, and the main street in this case, an ever expanding precinct of badly designed cheaply built high density housing. These will add to the stock of other similar structures forming “North Dunedin’s slums of the future”. Ratepayers’ will probably end up funding the future purchase of such cheap accomodation to mitigate associated social problems and the appalling visual amenity. Very poor city planning indeed.

Habitable room disasters
Submitted by ej kerr on Fri, 11/12/2015 – 12:43pm.

Prominent George St corner sites are being trashed by the banal. More habitable rooms – No emphasis on good contemporary design, no flair.
This one’s built right to the footpath on the main street, with little modulation and no hint of garden or vertical planting possible, except something to the corner part-screened by the witless bus shelter shoved on its concrete pad.
Given the rich inheritance, where has Dunedin street architecture gone? Where are the design professions? Why so much visual erosion? Where is the NZ Institute of Architects? Why no City Architect Office and independent Urban Design Panel to uphold design values for Dunedin residents and ratepayers?
Ugh! DCC planning fail. DCC urban design fail. DCC district plan fail. When will DCC grow up – to promote sympathetic edgy contemporary architecture and design for major city axials, at the very least. A step up from turning Dunedin into bog city with tawdry gateway approaches.

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6.1.14 George Street: Two new uglies (thanks DCC, no City Architect…)

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9.1.14 Facadism: 3%, 10%, 50%, 75%, 99.9% (how much is enough) | University of Otago warps Castle Street

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: misted lettered tweaked by whatifdunedin

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Resene Architecture and Design Film Festival 2015

91a4b62b0b528da42499fb8aff16da60This came in this morning, belatedly. Slight marketing glitch; NZIA Southern who normally helps market the festival doesn’t appear to have been notified by the festival organisers. Anyway, get along to what’s left of the viewing programme !!!

The fourth annual Resene Architecture & Design Film Festival will showcase acclaimed and current films in architecture and design, including furniture, industrial, graphic, urban and landscape.

The festival will play in four locations this year with Christchurch being welcomed as the fourth city in the festival.

Auckland, Rialto Cinemas Newmarket, 7-20 May
Wellington, Embassy Theatre, 28 May – 10 June
Dunedin, Rialto Cinemas, 11 – 21 June
Christchurch, Academy Gold, 25 June – 8 July

Tickets for the festival are on sale now.

Rialto Cinemas has partnered with Clearly & Co, who curated the films for this year’s line-up. Curators Tracey Lee and Clare Buchanan say, “As New Zealand faces urban growth and renewal on an unprecedented scale, it is an important time to fuel the conversation. We hope this fusion of films stimulates a dialogue and opens minds to the possibilities for architecture and design in our lives, communities and cities.”

This year’s festival has been grouped into themes, so audiences can navigate towards stories they are most curious about. “We have brought together 22 films from all over the world, with everything from epic tales of architectural icons and visionaries; fascinating insight into experiments in urban and industrial design; intimate glimpses into spaces and communities; and celebrations of rooftop gardens and garden lovers. The festival is also hosting an In Memoriam event with Athfield Architects for Ian Athfield, who we lost earlier this year.”

Naming rights sponsor Resene Marketing Manager Karen Warman says Resene is once again delighted to be bringing the festival to New Zealand with Rialto Cinemas. “Before the last festival finished, we were already getting requests for it to come back again. The Resene Architecture & Design Film Festival is such a unique opportunity for everyone to indulge their interest in, and love of, great architecture and design. The films are thought provoking and celebratory. Resene has a long history of supporting New Zealand architecture and being a part of this festival helps to remind us all how important great design is.”

2015 RADFF Festival Programme (PDF, 2 MB)

█ More at http://www.rialto.co.nz/filmfestivals/resene

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WikiHouseNZ @ Christchurch #eqnz

WikiHouseNZ - BackYarder (via stuff.co.nz)Possible interior of a WikiHouseNZ project called the BackYarder
Photo: Tigran Haruyunyan, WikiHouse (via Stuff)

The new prototype, called the Backyarder, is the “nucleus of a much larger house”. –Danny Squires, WikiHouseNZ

### Stuff.co.nz Last updated 08:20, April 6 2015
Business
WikiHouse project ‘a social enterprise’
A communal house-building network that started in the dark days after the Christchurch earthquake will be a reality this year. WikiHouse is an open hardware project, where experts design houses, or parts of them, and share their creations online for any house builder who wants to use them.
WikiHouseNZ co-founders and directors Danny Squires and Martin Luff will build a 25-30 square metre prototype house by the end of the year, they said at a launch event. The house will be fully enclosed, watertight, insulated, plumbed and wired for electricity and the internet. It would cost no more than a conventional house of the same size, Luff said.
The pair would seek consent for the building. It would initially be manufactured and assembled in WikiHouseNZ’s lab in Addington, but could be disassembled in hours and moved anywhere. WikiHouses are built from plywood shaped by a computer-controlled cutting machine. Components were fastened with plywood pegs rather than nails or screws.
The houses are more than “hobbyist prefab systems”, said Alastair Parvin, the London-based architect credited with launching the WikiHouse idea in 2011. The New Zealanders came aboard almost immediately and were in effect co-founders, Parvin told the launch via Skype. The New Zealand arm was a social enterprise. It generated profits but used them for a social good.
Read more

WikiHouse/NZ developed by Space Craft Systems
Space Craft Systems is a social enterprise forged in the crucible of post earthquake Christchurch to develop the WikiHouse system in NZ and revolutionise the way we create our built environments. http://spacecraft.co.nz/wikihouse-news/

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23.4.14 WikiHouse.cc | open source construction set

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ZAHA HADID – Tokyo 2020 Olympic Stadium

dkTV Published on Nov 7, 2013

ZAHA HADID – Tokyo 2020 Olympic Stadium
National Olympic Stadium in Tokyo by Zaha Hadid Architects
Area: 290,000 m², Capacity: 80,000 people
Estimated cost: US $1 billion, Estimated completion: March 2019

The National Stadium used for the 1964 Summer Olympics, located in Kasumigaoka, in Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan, will essentially be torn down in 2015 to make way for the new venue in time for the 2019 Rugby World Cup and the 2020 Summer Olympics. It will also be the future home of the Japanese national football team. The new Tokyo National Stadium is more than a large sports facility designed to the highest design specifications and functional requirements. It is a piece of the city’s fabric, and urban connector which enhances and modulates people moving through the site from different directions and points of access. The elevated ground connections govern the flow of people through the site, effectively carving the geometric forms of the building.

█ More on the Stadium and Hadid’s architecture at Google Images

ZahaHadid Architects Published on Sep 15, 2014

Zaha Hadid Architects
This film shows some of the people and projects of Zaha Hadid Architects. It aims to convey the ideas and ambitions behind their work. Some of their academic design research, with students from AADRL and Vienna University of Applied Arts, is also featured.

Aside —Fashion DOES something….
Science and Technology [see videos within a video]

Wired UK Published on Oct 18, 2014
Will.i.am and Zaha Hadid reveal PULS designs: full WIRED2014 talk

Full story: http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2014-10/17/william

Will.i.am and architect Zaha Hadid have collaborated on special editions of the recently announced PULS smart cuff, which they showed off on stage together at WIRED2014 in London. The PULS smart cuff — or wise band, as will.i.am jokingly refers to it — is the first wearable product released by his company, i.amPLUS. In the UK it will be sold by O2 and will be available pretty soon, if hints are to be believed. “I’m itching to say when it’s coming out,” says will.i.am, before not-so-subtly whispering, “Now-vember”, in the direction of the audience. The PULS is a “standalone communication and socialisation device” that contains a battery, speakers, SIM card and chipset. It sports a curved OLED screen and has 3G, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and GPS. “No phone required; this is your phone,” says will.i.am, demonstrating one of the two cuffs he himself wears on his wrist.

█ More Google Images for Zaha Hadid
Google Images for Zaha Hadid Product….

Zaha Hadid. Superyacht for Blohm+Voss - birdseye [archdaily.net]Zaha Hadid. Superyacht design for Blohm+Voss. Photo: archdaily.net

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Charles Jencks —extreme emotion and neutrality

Dalian International Conference Centre, China 4

►► Jencks excerpts [click to enlarge or ctrl +]

Jencks, Charles - Architecture Becomes Music. Essay 6 May 2013 - Architectural Review 1

Jencks - Architecture Becomes Music. 6 May 2013 - Architectural Review 2b

Ed Sheeran Published on Oct 7, 2014
Ed Sheeran – Thinking Out Loud [Official Video]
Here’s my official video for ‘Thinking Out Loud’, I learnt to dance! Taken from my album ‘x’, available to buy via iTunes here: http://smarturl.it/x-itunesdlx

Jencks - Architecture Becomes Music. 6 May 2013 - Architectural Review 3a

TaylorSwiftVEVO Published on Nov 10, 2014
Taylor Swift – Blank Space
Watch Taylor’s new video for “Blank Space”. No animals, trees, automobiles or actors were harmed in the making of this video. Taylor’s new release 1989 is Available Now on iTunes http://www.smarturl.it/TS1989

Dalian International Conference Centre, China 9

Coop Himmelb(l)au, Dalian Conference Center, China, 2008-12.
A continuously changing surface that rises and falls and bulges in the middle to include a theatre and opera house. Organised like block chords of music that open up and close, it is reminiscent of both Wagnerian chromaticism and the tonal melding of Philip Glass and John Adams.

Jencks - Architecture Becomes Music. 6 May 2013 - Architectural Review 4a

http://www.coop-himmelblau.at/architecture/projects/dalian-international-conference-center

Dalian International Conference Centre, China 3Dalian International Conference Centre, ChinaDalian International Conference Centre, China 2Dalian International Conference Centre, China 7Dalian International Conference Centre, China 6Dalian International Conference Centre, China 5Dalian International Conference Centre, China 8Images: Coop Himmelb(l)au —Wolf D. Prix and Partner ZT GmbH

█ More at Google Images

█ Download: Charles Jencks – Architecture Becomes Music | The Architectural Review 6 May 2013 via academia.edu [research]

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Kimbell Art Museum Expansion (Piano Pavilion)

Kimbell Art Museum [indiaartndesign.com]Kimbell Art Museum [indiaartndesign.com]

The Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas
Museum of international art with collections ranging from antiquities to 20th century contemporary art — 3333 Camp Bowie Boulevard, Fort Worth, TX 76107, United States

The Renzo Piano Pavilion at Kimbell’s was in production for six years — Piano accepted the commission in 2007, groundbreaking occurred in 2010, and the Grand Opening took place on November 27, 2013.

“Close enough for a conversation, not too close and not too far away,” remarked architect Renzo Piano, when describing the distance from the Kimbell’s new Renzo Piano Pavilion to the Louis Kahn Building. Piano’s structure, made of glass, concrete, and wood and surrounded by elms and red oaks, stands as an expression of simplicity and lightness some 65 yards to the west of Kahn’s vaulted, luminous museum landmark of 1972.

Kimbell - Kahn Pavilion 1 [texasmonthly.com]Louis Kahn Building [texasmonthly.com]

Kimbell Art Museum section - Renzo Piano Kendall Heaton Associates [archdaily.net]Renzo Piano Kendall Heaton Associates section [archdaily.com]

ArtandSeek Published on Sep 12, 2013
An Early Look At the Kimbell’s Piano Pavilion
Eric Lee, Director of the Kimbell Art Museum explains some of the design features of the new Piano Pavilion, and the excitement surrounding the building’s opening.

KimbellArt Published on Nov 26, 2013
Kahn : Piano – The Piano Pavilion at the Kimbell Art Museum

DESIGN
Piano’s low-slung, colonnaded pavilion with overhanging eaves graciously acknowledges Kahn’s museum building by way of its kindred height, emphasis on natural light, and use of concrete as a primary material. The positioning of the pavilion on the site focuses attention on the west facade of the Kahn Building, which Kahn considered to be the main entrance.
The pavilion is made up of two sections connected by a glass passageway. The front, or easternmost, section conveys an impression of weightlessness: a glass roof system seems to float high above wooden beams and concrete posts. Sleek, square concrete columns flank the central, recessed glass entrance and wrap around three sides of the building. The tripartite facade articulates the interior, with a spacious entrance lobby and large galleries to the north and south.
Tucked under a green roof, the Piano Pavilion’s western section contains a gallery for light-sensitive works of art, three education studios, a large library with reading areas, and an auditorium with superior acoustics for music. The latter, located below ground level, is a design centrepiece: its raked seating faces the stage and the dramatic backdrop of a light well animated by shifting patterns of natural light.
Read more at https://www.kimbellart.org/architecture/piano-pavilion

Kimbell - Piano Pavilion [hyperallergic.com]Kimbell - Piano Pavilion [i.ytimg.com youtube maxresdefault]Renzo Piano Pavilion [hyperallergic.com and maxresdefault at youtube.com]

These time-lapse construction videos are worth the effort — in most cases buildings under construction satisfy the aesthetic complexities of the brain and the body as witness, better than any finished object.

visualimmersion Published on Aug 8, 2012
Kimbell Art Museum Expansion (Piano Pavilion) Animation

KimbellArt Published on Nov 13, 2013
A Glimpse into the Renzo Piano Pavilion at the Kimbell Art Museum

KimbellArt Published on Oct 7, 2014
Completed time-lapse photography of the Renzo Piano Pavilion
Kimbell Art Museum July 2011–September 2013. EarthCam.
The green spaces and sustainable features of the new building construction site are emerging, including the placement of a sophisticated, layered roof-structure, the installation of geothermal wells, and the planting of trees and grass.

KimbellArt Published on Sep 10, 2013
Renzo Piano’s Walls for the Kimbell Art Museum

KimbellArt Published on Oct 19, 2013
Renzo Piano’s Beams for the Kimbell Art Museum HD

KimbellArt Published on Oct 25, 2013
Renzo Piano’s Columns for the Kimbell Art Museum HD

KimbellArt Published on Oct 25, 2013
Renzo Piano’s Glass Roof for the Kimbell Art Museum HD

KimbellArt Published on Oct 25, 2013
Renzo Piano’s Landscape Roof for the Kimbell Art Museum HD

KimbellArt Published on Oct 25, 2013
Landscape at the Renzo Piano Pavilion HD

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Warehouse conversions | Apartment interiors #materials #light #colour

Loft-Barcelona-01 [homedsgn.com]

Warehouse Converted to Modern Loft
This 8,600 square-foot loft was completed and renovated by developers and designers of urban lofts Benito Escat and Alberto Rovira; the designers teamed up with interior design studio Minim for this ambitious project. What was once stables (built in 1930), a bomb shelter and then a print shop is now a modern loft located in Barcelona, Spain. The original brick walls are exposed, and the high concrete ceilings make the space truly magnificent. Glass lights set in the floor reveal the bearing structure and provide light to the level below.

More photos at http://www.iintrepidinc.com/lifeinstyle/2011/9/29/a-rustic-modern-loft-warehouse-conversion-barcelona.html

Russian architect Denis Krasikovis created this eclectic apartment in Murmansk, Russia.

001-murmansk-apartment-denis-krasikov [homeadore.com]004-murmansk-apartment-denis-krasikov [homeadore.com]008-murmansk-apartment-denis-krasikov [homeadore.com]002-murmansk-apartment-denis-krasikov [designyoutrust.com]011-murmansk-apartment-denis-krasikov [homeadore.com]

More photos at http://www.homeadore.com/2014/12/09/murmansk-apartment-denis-krasikov/

In 2014, Vertebrae Architecture designed this tiny 330 square feet apartment in Venice, California. Full height hidden storage delineates space and provides visual and acoustic privacy. The minimal material palette minimizes distraction and maximizes the spatial quality of the apartment.

001-micro-apartment-vertebrae-architecture [homeadore.com]004-micro-apartment-vertebrae-architecture [designyoutrust.com]006-micro-apartment-vertebrae-architecture [homeadore.com]007-micro-apartment-vertebrae-architecture [designyoutrust.com]

More images at http://www.homeadore.com/2014/12/08/micro-apartment-vertebrae-architecture/

Rad Design fully demolished and redesigned the interior of this loft in Toronto, Canada. Custom shelving and displays show off the client’s antique camera collection and books on photography. The client had requested use of reclaimed wood materials and simple, metal elements. A small black platform makes the low bed float slightly above the floor. The bright new kitchen and bathroom add modern touches.

001-photo-loft-rad-design [homeadore.com]004-photo-loft-rad-design [homeadore.com]003-photo-loft-rad-design [homeadore.com]006-photo-loft-rad-design [homeadore.com]005-photo-loft-rad-design [homeadore.com]008-photo-loft-rad-design [homeadore.com]009-photo-loft-rad-design [homeadore.com] 1

More images at http://www.homeadore.com/2014/11/04/photo-loft-rad-design/

Warehouse in San Francisco Converted into Contemporary Loft
This project located in the historic Oriental Warehouse Loft Building in San Francisco’s South Beach neighbourhood, is a complete reconfiguration and renovation of an existing loft apartment. In order to maximize the spatial experience of the loft, traditional notions of domestic privacy were abandoned in favour of open and transparent relationships. Here is more on the renovation process from the architects: “Opaque guardrails at the sleeping mezzanine were replaced with frameless glass guardrails in order to provide a direct visual connection to the living room below. A large over-sized sheet of transparent glass further eliminates privacy in the master bathroom by allowing views into and out of the bathroom to the rest of the loft beyond. In contrast to the existing heavy-timber and rusticated brick structural shell which are left exposed, sleek new interior finishes were replaced throughout including wall and floor finishes, kitchen and bathroom mill work and a new steel cantilever stair that connects the living areas on the ground floor with the sleeping areas on the mezzanine.”

Oriental Warehouse Loft exterior [freshome.com]Oriental Warehouse Loft 2a Edmonds + Lee Architects [edmondslee.com]Oriental Warehouse Loft 4a Edmonds + Lee Architects [edmondslee.com]Oriental Warehouse Loft 6a Edmonds + Lee Architects [edmondslee.com]Oriental Warehouse Loft 8a Edmonds + Lee Architects [edmondslee.com]Oriental Warehouse Loft 13a Edmonds + Lee Architects [edmondslee.com]Oriental Warehouse Loft 7a Edmonds + Lee Architects [edmondslee.com]Oriental Warehouse Loft 11a Edmonds + Lee Architects [edmondslee.com]Oriental Warehouse Loft 3a Edmonds + Lee Architects [edmondslee.com]Oriental Warehouse Loft 9a Edmonds + Lee Architects [edmondslee.com]

Edmonds + Lee Architects: http://www.edmondslee.com/owl.html

Jestico & Whiles, Andel’s Hotel Łódź, Poland, warehouse conversion (completed 2009)
Located in central Łódź, the hotel features a top-floor spa centre and modern interior design. Its spacious and bright rooms come with air conditioning and a flat-screen TV. The hotel houses a luxury spa, the skySPAce, featuring a glass-covered swimming pool with beautiful city views, as well as various saunas, a massage parlour and a fitness centre. The hotel is a beautiful building with a post-industrial character. You can see an old and historical place (loads of old factory elements) and on the other hand the building is really modern. The Andel’s Hotel Łódź is housed in the cultural and commercial complex of Manufaktura, just 1.5 km from the famous Piotrkowska Street. The hotel was recently awarded the best in Poland in a European ranking.

Andel's Hotel, Lodz, Poland 6 exterior [booking.com]Andels Hotel, Lodz, Poland 1 facade with pool room [op-architekten.com]Andels Hotel, Lodz, Poland 1 pool [holidaycheck.com]Andels Hotel, Lodz, Poland 1 pool [tripadvisor.com]Andels Hotel, Lodz, Poland 2 lobby area [vi-hotels.com]JAW-AHL-0003Andels Hotel, Lodz, Poland top light [wikimedia.org]Andels Hotel, Lodz, Poland 3 lobby area [thecoolhunter.net]Andel's Hotel, Lodz, Poland 1 dining [e-architect.co.uk]Andels Hotel, Lodz, Poland 2 restaurant [tripadvisor.com]Andels Hotel, Lodz, Poland standard suite [vi-hotels.com]Andels Hotel, Lodz, Poland meeting room [urlowpolsce.pl]

More photos and their sources via Google Images

Lant Street warehouse conversion, Southwark, London
Dow Jones Architects
An ongoing process of urban regeneration has seen the transformation of nineteenth century light industrial buildings into residential quarters for the liberal middle classes. In Lant Street, a five-level former brick warehouse is a case in point; over the past few years it has been gradually transformed into residential property with an art gallery below street level. Dow Jones Architects was asked to convert the top two floors and the roof, with spectacular views of the city, into a separate apartment. The brief was unequivocal; the client asked for ‘London in my living room’.
Giving views of the City skyline, only previously available from the rooftop, required the placement of the living room on the uppermost floor, with the sleeping and bathroom area on lowest level and the kitchen and dining in the middle. Preserving the stairways in their original locations allowed a relatively unpartitioned organisation of the individual floors, with just two oversized, automatically operated fire doors unobtrusively concealed in wall linings. Dow Jones’ internal material palette combines the original brick surfaces and rough timber structure with new smooth oak linings with flush camouflaged doors. The in-situ concrete boxes that mark the wet areas – bathroom, shower room, kitchen – read as discrete objects placed atop the existing surfaces.

DowJonesArchitects Lant Street warehouse conversion, Southwark, London [architecturetoday.co.uk]

Read more at http://www.architecturetoday.co.uk/?p=6122

Historically Preserved Mansion Gets Eclectic Makeover
A true mansion, originally from 1922, with preserved architecture and full of details that reveal a rare magnificence, is the headquarters of the 22nd Edition of Casa Cor Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. With very high ceilings and large windows, the beautiful and famous building has been designed in an eclectic style with over 5,400 square metres of constructed area, divided into 52 environments, with about 80 professionals who have demonstrated that it is possible to renew with style, but without deleting the marks of time. The building was once a Boarding School of Nursing Anna Nery (1926- 1973) and the College Student House (1973-1995). Here, past, present and future coexist im harmony.

Casa-Cor-13-1-Kindesign [onekindesign.com]

Casa-Cor-34-1-Kindesign [onekindesign.com]

Interactive room. Reuse was the watchword for Tiana Meggiolaro and Bia Lynch who set up the room with brick walls left exposed. “Based on the concept of upcycling and demos new function was given to the pallets, wooden structures used in freight transport that became bookshelf and countertop,” says Tiana.Casa-Cor-54-1-Kindesign [onekindesign.com]

Jewellery. The space of interior designers Mariana Dean, Jason Sartori and Luciana Arnaud pays homage to the fashion designer Coco Chanel and makes reference to her jewellery.
Casa-Cor-45-1-Kindesign [onekindesign.com]

More at http://www.onekindesign.com/tag/preservation/page/5/

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25.12.14 2Modern Blog | Modern Decor + Architecture + Interiors
19.10.14 Dunedin: Randoms from inside warehouse precinct 18.10.14
22.6.14 Vogel Street Heritage Precinct (TH13)
17.4.11 Ricardo Bofill’s cement factory
28.12.10 Urban Outfitters Corporate Campus / Meyer, Scheter & Rockcastle

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2Modern Blog | Modern Decor + Architecture + Interiors

2Modern (San Francisco) is a curator and brand ambassador for upscale modern furniture and modern lighting design. The website features new names on the design scene, trends, and weekly design editorials. 2Modern is an authorised dealer for leading brands including Knoll, Kartell, Artek, and Emeco; and contemporary lighting brands like FLOS, Louis Poulsen, FontanaArte, and Artemide. 2Modern also represents emerging design talent, like Blu Dot, James De Wulf, Gus*, LZF, and Skram.

The following samples appear in rough visual/formal order, not date order.
Follow links to view more images.

blog.2modern.com Tokyo Design Week - Spiral Lamp by Chris Kirby 1blog.2modern.com Tokyo Design Week - Spiral Lamp by Chris Kirby 2

Big in Japan
blog.2modern.com 21 Nov 2008
Is it wrong that out of all the great work showcased at Tokyo Design Week (2008), the product I’m most excited about is largely because it reminds me of my favourite childhood Christmas decorations? Designed by Canadian born, Tokyo based industrial designer Chris Kirby, the Spiral Lamp is an exploration of the interaction between light and matter, the impassable and the transmissive, flat and voluminous, and growing the complex from the simple. cont/

blog.2modern.com Tokyo Design Week - Spiral Lamp by Chris Kirby 3

blog.2modern.com New York City Fulton Center Subway ComplexNew York City’s Fulton Center Subway Complex
blog.2modern.com 12 Nov 2014
A decade in the making, at a cost of 1.4 billion dollars, the former Fulton Street station, irretrievably battered during the September 11, 2001 attacks, has risen from the ashes as Fulton Center, a sparkling convergence of 9 subway lines, designed and realized by a consortium of firms—headed by the architectural practice, Grimshaw, and the engineering and planning company, Arup.

blog.2modern.com 10 Loft Three Marias, Lisbon. AVA Architects. Photo Jose Campos-yatzerA Lisbon Home With A Bookish Twist
blog.2modern.com 24 Nov 2014
This meticulously refurbished Lisbon loft has plenty to recommend it—its decadent size and sumptuously ornamental (circa 1893) ceiling, for starters—but it’s the space-dividing open bookshelf that caught our eye. This spare-no-details renovation is by AVA Architects.

blog.2modern.com cTokyo Designers Week: Joint Installation by Vitra and Artek
blog.2modern.com 13 Nov 2014
Tokyo Designers Week (2014) was an occasion for Artek and Vitra to present their first joint installation since Vitra’s acquisition of the Finnish brand in 2013. Taking over the Light Box Studio exhibition space in Tokyo’s Aoyama neighbourhood, the installations merged the most iconic modern furniture, lighting, and decorative pieces.

blog.2modern Stockholm, Sweden - Miss Clara Hotel by Gert Wingårdh Architects,jpgSwede Sensation: Stockholm’s New Miss Clara Hotel
blog.2modern.com 2 Dec 2014
The city’s recently opened Miss Clara Hotel is a refurbishment courtesy of Gert Wingårdh Architects. The 1910 former all-girls school has been transformed into a 92-room hotel. The architects have a pitch-perfect instinct for exquisite balance: venerable with contemporary, original with new, dark with white, visual lightness with textural richness.

blog.2modern.com New York Stylish Breathing Rooms - BreatherpaperfactoryStylish Breathing Rooms From Breather
blog.2modern.com 10 Nov 2014
A year-old New York company has stolen a page familiar to cheap motel owners by renting rooms by the hour. Breather, the brainchild of Canadian and best-selling author Julien Smith, taps into the smart phone revolution—by turning unused spaces within a city into stylishly appointed modernist dens that offer welcoming respite to anyone with a smart phone, in search of a personal or professional rendezvous spot, or just in need of a long nap.

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Auckland’s Civic Building first skyscraper #Modern

Aotea Square 1981 [heritageetal.blogspot.com] 1

Photographer Patrick Reynolds says the Civic is an important building by an important architect – chief city architect Tibor Donner (1946-1967) – and it appealed enormously as “Hotel Moderne” with its modernist credentials.

Civic Building on Aotea Square [metromag.co.nz]

### metromag.co.nz June 10, 2014
Urban Design
The Civic Building: Modernist Folly, Architectural Treasure
By Chris Barton
Why we should all be up in arms at the threatened demolition of the Auckland Council Civic Building.
There’s a surprise at the top of the hated Civic Building. From afar, you could guess there was some sort of observation deck, but the central roof-top courtyard open to the sky and to terrific east and west viewing across the cityscape to the harbour is a delight. Shut to the public since the 1970s, the restricted area is looking a little shabby, but one can easily imagine how the space could be brought back to life and, combined with a makeover of the staff cafeteria a level below, could be the tearoom talk of the town. Here might be a rare commodity in Auckland — public space on high — given that most other high places are either off limits, commercialised or privatised.
No 1 Greys Ave, formerly known as the Auckland City Council Administration Building, has plenty of other unique features: the rolled Corbusian corners of the metal-clad plant room, the curvy Le Corbusier-inspired entrance canopy, the mezzanine lobby and the precast terrazzo treads and iron balustrades of the open staircase.
Read more + Photos by Patrick Reynolds

Civic Building on Aotea Square (2011) by Caleb [stuffcrush.blogspot.co.nz]

### NZ Herald Online 11:51 AM Tuesday Nov 18, 2014
Bid to save NZ’s first skyscraper
By Bernard Orsman – Super City reporter
Plans to save New Zealand’s first skyscraper, the Civic Building on Aotea Square, or demolish it have been outlined to councillors and the media today. Council officers have been investigating options and market interest to refurbish the building, which will be empty by the New Year after serving as the city’s main civic administration building since 1966. The wrecking ball has been hanging over the building since the Auckland Council paid $104 million for the 31-storey ASB Bank Centre in Albert St for its new headquarters. The 100m tower was designed in the 1950s and completed in 1966. It has been criticised as an ugly box, but many architects marvel at its features. Architect Julia Gatley, an authority on modern architecture in New Zealand, has praised it as a beautifully proportioned, slender building that encapsulates modernism. It has no heritage status, but two reports have suggested it warrants a category A listing, and the council’s heritage division says it merits category B status. Heritage New Zealand also wants to see it gain heritage status and saved. The council’s property arm said without major refurbishment and the removal asbestos it would be unsuitable for council or other uses, such as commercial, residential and hotel. Auckland Council Property said it would cost about $78 million for full refurbishment to modern office and code requirements, or $60 million for a residential conversion. Demolition and site reinstatement is estimated at between $11.5 million to $12.5 million.
Read more

Aotea new [Regional Facilities Auckland via nzherald.co.nz]Civic Building demolished – revamped Aotea Square with new ‘teletubbie’ commercial buildings | Regional Facilities Auckland

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images: (from top) heritageetal.blogspot.com – Former Auckland City Council Administration Building, 1 Greys Avenue (1981); metromag.co.nz – Civic Building on Aotea Square by Patrick Reynolds; stuffcrush.blogspot.co.nz – Civic Building, fenestration detail (2011) by Caleb

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NZIA Southern: Ted McCoy Lecture Series 2014

21 November – Barclay Theatre, Otago Museum at 6:00 PM

A public lecture by Lance Herbst of Herbst Architects
focusing [on Context] as a driver of design.

All welcome [click to enlarge]

NZIA Southern - Ted McCoy Lecture Series 2014 (Lance Herbst)

█ Website: http://herbstarchitects.co.nz/

Herbst Architects Ltd is a New Zealand Institute of Architects registered practice, established in 2000 by principals Lance and Nicola Herbst.
The practice has completed a wide range of works in the fields of residential, commercial and education for which they have been the recipient of multiple awards for architecture, including 14 NZIA awards and the 2012 Home of the Year award. Their works have been widely published, both locally and internationally. The practice maintains a small office in Auckland that strives to make a positive and meaningful contribution to the built environment through excellence in architecture.

HerbstArchitects (detail) 1

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WikiHouse.cc | open source construction set

WikiHouse is an Open Source construction system that makes it possible for anyone to design, download, adapt, share and ‘print’ CNC-milled* high-performance, low-cost houses that they can assemble by hand with minimal formal skill or training, anywhere.

WikiHouse is a non-profit project, developing hardware and software which is open and shared in the commons, owned by everyone.

WikiHouse diagram 1

The purpose of the WikiHouse construction set is that the end structure is ready to be made weathertight using cladding, insulation, damp-proof membranes and windows. WikiHouse is still an experiment in its early stages.

*CNC means Computer Numerical Control. A computer converts the design produced by Computer Aided Design software (CAD), into numbers. The numbers can be considered to be the coordinates of a graph and they control the movement of the cutter. In this way the computer controls the cutting and shaping of the material.

Visit the Open library and read the Design guide.

All the information shared on WikiHouse.cc is offered as an open invitation to the public, collaborators and co-developers who are interested in putting Open Source solutions to these problems in the public domain. If you are working on one of these, or would like to know (or do) more, please contact WikiHouse.

TED 23 May 2013

Alastair Parvin: Architecture for the people by the people
Architect Alastair Parvin presents a simple but provocative idea: what if, instead of architects creating buildings for those who can afford to commission them, regular citizens could design and build their own houses? The concept is at the heart of Wikihouse.

TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more.
http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector

WikiHouse 2 (1)WikiHouse 1 (1)WikiHouse construction set (1)

Another profile:
WikiHouse prototype (1)

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George Street: Two new uglies (thanks DCC, no City Architect…)

(just DCC resource management planners with no design training, and use of the odd ‘consulting architect’ who lamely fails to press that architectural details be made “right”, lest they upset “the boys”—be they lousy small-time architects (as opposed to REAL DESIGN ARCHITECTS), architectural designers, draftsmen, builders, property developers or investors). Our kindom, for a City Architect —to compile and enforce design guidelines, and through district plan mechanisms, to require the use of registered architects by developers working in important townscape precincts like George Street, and to shove an unforgiving multidisciplinary Urban Design Panel at the buggers.

No. 1 —Apartments, 581 George Street
We’re all familiar with Farry’s Motel, now Farry’s Motel Apartments at 575 George Street. The complex used to look out on a green area, and vehicle parking with mature trees and shrubbery at 581.

DCC Webmap 575-581 George StreetDCC Webmap 575-581 George Street

Malcolm Farry recently sold the properties at 575 and 581 to Ethel Limited, a family company led by Frank Cazemier who has worked for Cutlers as a “University Investment Sales Specialist”. A cursory check of directorships at the NZ Companies Office website shows Cazemier is “one of the boys”. Pity he knows next to nothing about contextual commercial residential design, architectural bulk and location, facade modulation, sun angles, or landscape architecture —such that can’t be solved by ready trees.

575 George St (1c) IMG_4619581 George St (1c) IMG_4618581 George St (2d) IMG_4623

Farry’s Motel Apartments now looks out on a poorly designed featureless boundary fence, and the sobering double block of apartments ‘next door’ at 581. The block furthest from the street (walls of light blue), when seen from driveways to either side, reveals a ‘long elevation’ running parallel to George Street that resembles a jerry-built, badly-windowed reclad of a tired country hall (the low, horizontally-orientated fenestration allows for another floor of rooms above, in the roofspace).

581 George St (3c) IMG_4602581 George St (4c) IMG_4606

The marketing statement for Farry’s Motel Apartments at 575 still says:
“Set alongside a large grassed area that provides a playground and picnic spots, we are one of the most centrally located Dunedin motels, offering an absolutely superb main street position.”

This is no longer the case.
The very likely expensive exercise in ‘infill design’ (intensification/ densification…) issued from the drawing board of Bill Henderson, Architect of (fuck-a-daisy)WANAKA —someone who appears to work at the ‘cheap-looking’ end of the market, or at least has diminished design flare, poor knowledge of scale detail and proportion, and lack of expertise in three-dimensional architectural composition. As a result, and while meeting planning criteria for the zone, the motels/apartments at 575 and 581 now look about fit for student stays only, or at a pinch, the G&T parents of capping graduands. No fear, the new apartments will be mouth-wateringly expensive to rent. The student ghetto continues, behind the tacky dress-up to George Street.

Incidently, Farry’s operates a charge back system with the former Farry-owned Cargill’s Hotel, now Quality Hotel Cargills at 686 George Street.

****

No. 2 —Apartments, 2 St David Street, cnr George Street
There used to be a nice old single-storey bungalow with fine curving bay windows and a palm tree on this site, next to Quality Hotel Cargills. Only the palm tree remains. The bungalow became victim to an excavator. It isn’t clear if the windows and internal period joinery (if still present) were dismantled for re-use.

DCC Webmap - 2 St David Street2 St David Street (7b) IMG_03402 St David Street (9c)

The site is now owned by Newmarket Investments Limited and has been recently developed for apartments. The company directors are Clive Hewitson and wife Wendy May Hewitson. Clive Hewitson’s profile at LinkedIn says: “Director – Otago & Southland, New Zealand | Real Estate”. Hewitson is another of the “boys”, as records at the NZ Companies Office show. Some link up in the past with companies of which Frank Cazemier (mentioned above) has also been a director.

2 St David Street (2b) IMG_45912 St David Street (3b) IMG_4580

The apartment complex is faced, not too convincingly, in ‘red brick’ – at first glance, no-one can tell if it’s real brick facing or veneer! Questionable are the lack of reveals, and the scale and position of openings (doors and windows) in the street elevations; with tweaking to proportions and placements this could have solved. The glazing bars are wrong. Small frosted bathroom and toilet windows to the street (on the public face of your building) are a No-no. The shallowness of the gables to the street elevations, also grates in perspective. The grey wooden pickets added to the base of the original garden fence are odd. The whole is unnecessarily dreary. Taxi drivers hate it. The pencil cypresses may provide a foil, once mature (the building really needs one hell of a lot of ivy). Have to admit, designing anything between Quality Hotel Cargills and Econo Lodge Alcala is a free-for-all, BUT why not try…

2 St David Street (6c2) IMG_4583No registered architect. It shows. The developer used RJ Oliver Architectural Design, Mosgiel – spot the spelling mistake!

2 St David Street (1b) IMG_45982 St David Street (5b) IMG_4595

Why didn’t Quality Hotel Cargills buy 2 St David Street to take control of the prominent corner to George Street? We note Dunedin architect Hamish Wixon is a director/shareholder of 678 George Street Limited and Cargills Hotel Limited. Perhaps we can look forward to developments at the tired Cargills…

****

Strategic Site: 715 George Street, cnr Regent Road
Can we possibly imagine what will get built on the site of the former BP 2go Regent service station? Another horror story? Another ‘architectual’ (sic) bodice-ripper? 715 is owned by Northfield Property and Investment Company Limited. The sole director is Bryan Howard Usher of Dunedin.

DCC Webmap - 715 George StreetDCC Webmap – 715 George Street (context)

Post and building images by Elizabeth Kerr

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Norman Foster: SkyCycling utopia above London railways #ThinkBig

Or how to put DCC and NZTA to shame for their dangerous, low-design segregated cycle lane solution at Dunners. See the latest DCC / NZTA report, Summary of Cycle Safety Options Made Public, at Comments.

Foster SkyCycling utopia above London railways [dezeen.com]Foster SkyCycle [click to enlarge]

So Big Norm’s a cyclist, and when he gets a wee bit of work in New York City from time to time he likes to travel The High Line [Wikipedia]. But then. He had a gazumping thought about London congestion.

Foster is the only architect on Britain’s rich list.

### dezeen.com 2 January 2014
Norman Foster promotes “cycling utopia” above London’s railways
News: British architect Norman Foster has unveiled a concept to build a network of elevated pathways above London’s railways to create safe car-free cycling routes, following 14 cyclist deaths on the city’s streets in 2013.
Entitled SkyCycle, the proposal by architects Foster + Partners, landscape architects Exterior Architecture and transport consultant Space Syntax is for a “cycling utopia” of approximately 220 kilometres of dedicated cycle lanes, following the routes of existing train lines.
Over 200 entrance points would be dotted across the UK capital to provide access to ten different cycle paths. Each route would accommodate up to 12,000 cyclists per hour and could improve journey times across the city by up to half an hour.
“SkyCycle is a lateral approach to finding space in a congested city,” said Foster, who is both a regular cyclist and the president of Britain’s National Byway Trust. “By using the corridors above the suburban railways, we could create a world-class network of safe, car free cycle routes that are ideally located for commuters.”
If approved, the routes could be in place within 20 years, offering relief to a transport network that is already at capacity and will need to contend with 12 percent population growth over the next decade.
“To improve the quality of life for all in London and to encourage a new generation of cyclists, we have to make it safe. However, the greatest barrier to segregating cars and cyclists is the physical constraint of London’s streets, where space is already at a premium.”
According to the designers, construction of elevated decks would be considerably cheaper than building new roads and tunnels.
Read more

****

### dezeen.com 28 November 2013
Sandwichbike flat-pack wooden bicycle by PedalFactory goes into production
A flat-pack wooden bicycle that can be assembled in less than an hour has gone into production. PedalFactory claims the Sandwichbike can be unpacked and put together in just 45 minutes. The single-speed bike is constructed from 19 parts that are packaged and delivered in a box along with the tools required to assemble it. The Sandwichbike was launched in Amsterdam on Sunday 1 December 2013. This innovative wooden bicycle is now being shipped.
Read more + images/slide show

Sandwichbike delivery box by Pedal Factory [dezeen.com]Sandwichbike by Pedal Factory [dezeen.com]“If you can make a sandwich, you can make a Sandwichbike.”

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Images via dezeen.com

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Architect: Zaha Hadid —Al Wakrah Stadium, Qatar

Al Wakrah Stadium, Qatar - concept design, aerial view [zaha-hadid.com][zaha-hadid.com]

“The stadium will have a gross capacity of 40,000. The top-tiers of the stadium will be modular, allowing the stadium’s capacity to be lowered to 20,000.”

### zaha-hadid.com 18 November 2013
Qatar 2022 Supreme Committee unveils concept design for Al Wakrah Stadium

AL WAKRAH, QATAR: 16 November 2013 – The Qatar 2022 Supreme Committee today unveiled the new concept design for Al Wakrah Stadium. AECOM, in association with Zaha Hadid Architects, have developed the new, innovative design under the guidance of the Qatar 2022 Supreme Committee. Al Wakrah – famous for its fishing and seafaring heritage – is the proposed southern-most Host City for the 2022 FIFA World Cup.
Read more + slideshow

screen shot The Daily Show 1 (Hadid)[thedailyshow.com]

“Designed by famed architect Zaha Hadid whose signature style appears to be making some of the world’s most f**kable buildings…like Georgia O’Keeffe of things you can walk inside…I guess maybe it is time things evened out a bit.” –Jon Stewart

Unnecessary Muffness Originally aired at The Daily Show with Jon Stewart (Comedy Central, 19 Nov 2013). Qatar erects one of the world’s most f**kable soccer stadiums in preparation for the 2022 World Cup, but Al Madrigal can’t even find the press box. (04:56)

Video: http://www.cc.com/video-clips/q9k5o3/the-daily-show-with-jon-stewart-unnecessary-muffness

Comments at Archinect blog:
Unnecessary Muffness; Jon Stewart discusses Zaha’s “f**kable buildings”

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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2013 Southern Architecture Awards – NZ Institute of Architects

Civic rejuvenation a theme of Southern Architecture Awards

15 November 2013

Buildings that acknowledge a rich colonial heritage were celebrated in the 2013 Southern Architecture Awards, announced at Remarkables Primary School in Queenstown on Friday, 15 November.

The 12 award-winning projects span a number of architectural types, ranging from public buildings such as museums and bus shelters, to a gymnasium and study centre, and private homes located across the Otago and Southland regions.

Convenor of the jury, Queenstown architect Bronwen Kerr, said judging was made all the more rewarding because the team was able to visit a few gems, buildings, she said, that “instantly uplift the soul”. One such project was Pitches Store in the small settlement of Ophir, originally built in the 1880s and since refurbished to become a restaurant and hotel. “That was a definite highlight,” Kerr said. “It was wonderful to see how a single building could enhance the spirit of a town.” Similarly, in Cromwell, a new bus shelter and block of toilets, although utilitarian, are the first stage of a project heralding a “rejuvenation” of the public face of that historic town.

Architects Justin Wright and Nick Mouat, along with broadcaster Leanne Malcolm, joined Kerr on the Awards jury. Although there was much debate, the jury shared a similar response to the projects they visited. “There was a nice alignment in the way we thought and felt about the buildings,” Kerr said.

The jury members agreed that the redeveloped Toitu Otago Settlers Museum is a “remarkable asset” for Dunedin. The project unites various structures from different eras into a cohesive whole and does a good job of connecting the railway station to Queens Gardens, Kerr said. “It’s not just a museum honouring the history of the early settlers, it’s also a ‘museum of buildings’.”

While the scale of the museum is large, many of the award-winning buildings had modest budgets. “We gave a number of awards to houses that were not big or expensive,” Kerr said. For example, an energy-efficient suburban home in Wanaka and a simple bach at the mouth of the Taieri River, constructed in just eight weeks, felt so comfortable that the jury just “didn’t want to leave”.

██ NZIA 2013 Southern Architecture Awards – winners information, citations and more photos at NZIA website

Recipients of 2013 Southern Architecture Awards

A building that successfully threads together stands of architectural history is a double Awards winner. Toitu Otago Settlers Museum in Dunedin has been transformed into a “living archive” and given a dramatic new entrance area by Baker Garden Architects and Robert Tongue Architect.

In awarding the project in the Public Architecture category, the jury commented that the contemporary glass addition not only provides an “entrance with clarity” but reconnects the museum to the city in a “physical and community sense”.

NZIA Southern 2013 Toitu Otago Settlers MuseumNZIA Southern 2013 Toitu Otago Settlers Museum 1

Toitu Otago Settlers Museum was also recognised in the Heritage category. The same architects had amalgamated a “unique aggregate of buildings” while skilfully managing to hide the “sophisticated environmental mechanics” of a modern museum to deliver a seamless visitor experience.

Smaller in size but just as significant within the context of community, Pitches Store was the second project to feature in the Heritage category. Michael Wyatt Architect’s refurbishment and sensitive restoration of this old stone store had kept the building’s “endearing rawness,” the jury said.

A new gymnasium in a Dunedin college and a modern study centre at the University of Otago were awarded in the Education category.

NZIA Southern 2013 John McGlashan College Gymnasium 1John McGlashan College’s gymnasium, designed by McCoy and Wixon Architects would, the jury said, lure even the most reluctant student to participate in physical education. With its views over a golf-course and its industrial materiality, the gymnasium “retains its individuality” while sharing a language with a community of existing school buildings.

NZIA Southern 2013 Marsh Study CentreMason & Wales Architects’ redevelopment of the iconic ‘Gardies’ tavern recognises the “importance of the social” in the university context. The new Marsh Study Centre is not only a place of learning but, with its café and living area with a welcoming fireplace, is also a place of retreat.

The idea of refuge was explored by the same architects in Taieri Mouth Bach NZIA Southern 2013 Taieri Mouth Bachwhich, along with a bus shelter and public toilets, was acknowledged in the Awards’ Small Architecture category.
Mason & Wales Architects used a simple gable and “straightforward and robust” materials to capture “rawness” in this Kiwi bach which settles into the dunes, surrounded by fishing shacks. “If it were a poem, the building would be a haiku,” the jury said.

A pattern of falling leaves, cut in relief from a rusted steel sheet, brings a poetic influence to two workaday structures near the Cromwell Mall. Mary Jowett Architects’ clever design of this screen to provide privacy for the entrance of the public loo while simultaneously acting as a backdrop to the new bus shelter, achieves “lightness and delicacy” even while using a “robust and enduring” material palette.

Six private dwellings received awards – two in Wanaka, two in Dunedin and one each in Alexandra and Lake Hayes.

Awarded in both the Housing and Sustainable Architecture categories, Acland House by Rafe Maclean Architects is a family home in suburban Wanaka organised around three courtyards providing outdoor shelter from mountain breezes. The house also features hydronic heating in the floor and windows designed to act as “wind catchers” in the hot summer months.

The jury was understandably reluctant to leave when it visited Emerald Bluffs House by RTA Studio, also in Wanaka. The house enjoys views that celebrate its connection to landscape, enfolds as a “beautiful balance of private and collective spaces” and uses a tapestry of materials that “rewards all the senses”.

Further south, in Alexandra, Irving Smith Jack Architects referenced the tent villages of the gold-panning pioneers in a home built in a “raw and boundless landscape”. The home, with its insulated concrete core, tilted fly roofs and planning that is eccentric yet charming is, the jury said, “the original anti-villa”.

The first of the Dunedin duo in the Housing categoryNZIA Southern 2013 Black and White House of the Awards is a strong composition in black and white on Maori Hill. McCoy and Wixon Architects used an internal courtyard to imbue a compact design with a feeling of spaciousness. “Thoughtful and consistent” detailing augments the planning of this home constructed on a tight budget.

A steep site in the hills west of the city allowed Architectural Ecology to design a house that connects strongly with the vertical view of trees. The jury said the design of the Helensburgh Road HouseNZIA Southern 2013 Helensburgh Road House is “happily unafraid of complexity”. In keeping with the owners’ eco-friendly philosophies, sustainable timbers have been extensively used in a “multitude of exuberant forms” that cascade down the hillside.

Cedar, masonry and zinc are the material trio making up Lake Hayes Residence, designed by Warren and Mahoney Architects on a steep slope adjacent to a public walkway. The project, which comprises two forms and includes split-level flooring, was praised for its flexible planning which allows it to “morph between a comfortable home for two and a holiday house for wider family.”

The Southern Architecture Awards is a peer-reviewed programme of the New Zealand Institute of Architects. All recipients of 2013 Southern Architecture Awards are eligible for consideration for the top tier of the annual Architecture Awards programme, the New Zealand Architecture Awards. These awards will be announced in May 2014.

The New Zealand Architecture Awards are supported by Resene and judged by juries appointed by the New Zealand Institute of Architects and its branches.

Source: NZIA News & Media

ODT 16.11.13 Acclaim for great designs

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Architecture + Women Southern

architecture women Nov 2013 copy[click to enlarge]

Website: Architecture + Women

Related Post:
21.4.13 Architecture + Women • New Zealand

Snapshot 500: Architecture + Women New Zealand
Edited by Julia Gatley, Sara Lee et al – $29.95
Published by Balasoglou Books, September 2013, paperback, 210x150mm, 98pages, 9780987659552

Snapshot 500 coverThis small book belies its importance. There has never been anything like it published before – celebrating women in New Zealand architecture. It doubles as the catalogue for a series of events throughout the country. We believe it is a must for anyone interested in architecture and women’s place in it.

Women architects and designers have made a huge contribution to architecture and the built environment in New Zealand for many years. Many of these women are still not household names but they are nevertheless admired and respected in the profession.

This book presents close to 500 women, all involved in New Zealand architecture in some way, shape or form, from lead designer, company director and project manager through to graduate, student and team member. It shows that women have been leaders in every aspect of architectural design and production in this country, and that women architecture graduates are widely dispersed, both geographically and in their creative modes and outlets. The book was initiated through a newly formed society, Architecture + Women • New Zealand, and coincides with substantial exhibitions in Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Queenstown. It will appeal to anyone with an interest in contemporary New Zealand architecture and design.

It includes two introductory texts, the first by the four A+W NZ co-founders (Megan Rule, Lynda Simmons, Sarah Treadwell and Julie Wilson) and the second by Julia Gatley. This is followed by images illustrating the work of almost 400 women involved with architecture in New Zealand, and mention of the names of many more, such as those involved with the A+WNZ incorporated society and the exhibitions in Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Queenstown.

Enquiries: www.aaltobooks.co.nz

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Broadcast Notice: RA Lawson, architect

RNZ National
Sunday Morning with Chris Laidlaw

http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/sunday
22 September 2013

9.40 Norman Ledgerwood – Dunedin’s Victorian Architect
Norman Ledgerwood has just published a book about RA Lawson, the architect behind some of the country’s most important historical buildings. Scottish-born Lawson designed the First Presbyterian Church of Otago, Knox Presbyterian Church, Larnach Castle and the Dunedin Municipal Building. In his 28 years working in Dunedin from 1862 onwards, Lawson designed over 250 buildings, and his work also survives in many towns in Otago and Southland.
R.A. Lawson: Victorian Architect of Dunedin, by Norman Ledgerwood, with photography by Graham Warman, is published by the Historic Cemeteries Conservation Trust of New Zealand.
http://www.cemeteries.org.nz/

● Norman Ledgerwood ( 17′ 56″ )
Writer who chronicles the career of architect Robert Lawson, the man responsible for much of the historic skyline of Dunedin.
Audio | Downloads: Ogg MP3

Publication: 25 September 2013.
From the publicity material . . .

RA Lawson Victorian Architect of Dunedin [HCCTNZ]Following the discovery of gold in Otago, Dunedin quickly grew to become the largest and richest city in New Zealand. Among the architects who influenced the young city was the Scottish architect, Robert Arthur Lawson.

Lawson became more than a leading architect of the day, he was deeply involved in the management and affairs of his beloved Presbyterian Church. Over a short period Lawson played a major role in the growth of Dunedin — taking it from a small township to a city of remarkable and enduring Victorian architecture.

Lawson’s most significant works — First Presbyterian Church of Otago, Knox Presbyterian Church, Larnach Castle, Otago Boys’ High School, Dunedin Municipal Building — take their place amongst the country’s most important historical buildings and grace Dunedin to this day, giving the city its distinctive
character, unique among New Zealand’s towns and cities.

In R.A.Lawson Norman Ledgerwood celebrates the life and career of Lawson, and Graham Warman’s photographs offer an elegant tour of the living legacy of Lawson’s most prominent buildings.

This handsome volume is printed on fine art paper and is richly illustrated throughout with historical and contemporary photographs, as well as many of Lawson’s architectural drawings.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Ian Athfield at Dunedin | Open Lecture Friday 26 April

New Zealand Historic Places Trust RA Lawson Lecture

Ian Athfield — “Heritage Starts with a Great Idea Tomorrow”
Thoughts on community and heritage

New Zealand Historic Places Trust and New Zealand Institute of Architects – Southern Branch are co-sponsoring the public talk by one of New Zealand’s most well-known architects, Ian Athfield

Panel on stage – Lawrie Forbes (property developer), Glen Hazelton (DCC urban design), Elizabeth Kerr (architecture advocate), Stephen Macknight (structural engineer)

When: Friday 26 April 2013 at 7:30 pm

Where: University of Otago, St David Lecture Theatre
Union Street East, Dunedin

All welcome

****

Ian Athfield-1Ian Athfield is a prominent New Zealand architect who over his 40+ year career has contributed significantly to the built environment of New Zealand. He has a strong interest in urban design, landscape and the continuing craft of architecture with an emphasis on building off the existing physical environment.

While first establishing a reputation through innovative housing, Athfield is renowned for his big picture thinking in both urban and rural environments. He has been involved in the creation of many of New Zealand’s most successful urban spaces, landscapes, and buildings. His work continues to stretch across all scales from furniture and public sculpture to architecture, landscape, and urban design; and across type from domestic to civic.

Athfield’s contribution to architecture has received widespread recognition and not only earned his practice numerous design awards but earned him the 2004 NZIA Gold Medal, an honorary Doctorate in Literature from Victoria University and in 1996 the New Zealand Government made him a Companion to the New Zealand Order of Merit.

Ian Athfield is currently serving on the Board of The New Zealand Historic Places Trust, and as a member of the NZHPT Maori Heritage Council.

http://www.athfieldarchitects.co.nz/

Related Posts:
3.3.13 RNZ Sunday Morning | Ideas: Re-imagining the Urban House
25.6.12 New Zealand Architects: Pete Bossley, and Ian and Claire Athfield
7.12.11 Ian Athfield on post-earthquake Christchurch #eqnz
19.9.11 NZIA members on Christchurch City Plan

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Architecture + Women • New Zealand

Architecture + Women NZ screenshot 1

Updated post 26.10.14 at 6:57 p.m.
The following information is reproduced in the public interest.

Architectural Theory Review, 17:2-3, 280-298

LIMITED VISIBILITY – Portraits of Women Architects (PDF, 721 KB)
By Sarah Treadwell & Nicole Allan

Version of record first published: 08 Feb 2013

This paper considers the visibility of women architects across three New Zealand sites: the institutional architecture journal, the national architecture award system and a local website that allows for self-representation. The website, Architecture + Women, was set up in 2011 in anticipation of an exhibition of the work of New Zealand women architects planned for 2013 as an anniversary of an earlier event, ‘‘Constructive Agenda’’, held in 1993. The website accumulates images of women in New Zealand who identify as architects. The paper considers the portrayal of women architects in each of the three sites, juxtaposing a sociological viewpoint with the biographical, seen as distinct yet overlapping modes of representation. Five portraits from the website are selected for detailed discussion as they reflect upon representations of femininity, colonial encounters, nature and the limits of the discipline—issues that are persistent for women architects in New Zealand.

To cite this article:
Sarah Treadwell & Nicole Allan (2012): Limited Visibility: Portraits of Women Architects, Architectural Theory Review, 17:2-3, 280-298

Architectural Theory Review, founded at the University of Sydney in 1996, and now in its eighteenth year, is the pre-eminent journal of architectural theory in the Australasian region. Now published by Taylor and Francis in print and online, the journal is an international forum for generating, exchanging and reflecting on theory in and of architecture. All texts are subject to a rigorous process of blind peer review.

Sarah Treadwell is Associate Professor at the School of Architecture and Planning (National Institute of Creative Arts and Industries), University of Auckland. Sarah’s research investigates the representation of architecture in colonial and contemporary images. Motels, gender and volcanic conditions of ground are also subjects of interest. Sarah has published in various books and journals including Architectural Theory Review, Architectural Design, Space and Culture, and Interstices. Her book Revisiting Rangiatea was the outcome of participation in the Gordon H Brown Lecture Series in 2008. Professional association: NZIA

Nicole Allan is an Architectural Graduate Practicing. Nicole works in the Christchurch Studio of Warren and Mahoney architects.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Dunedin Events: Gasworks150 + Heritage Impact150

Heritage Impact150

AN IMPORTANT HERITAGE EVENT FOR OCTOBER 2013
2013 marks the 150th anniversary of the first production of town gas in New Zealand. This event took place at the Dunedin Gasworks which operated from 1863 to 1987, being the last gasworks to close in New Zealand.

The Gasworks played a significant role in Dunedin’s industrial, economic and social growth during its operation.

Today the Gasworks Museum forms a distinctive part of Dunedin’s industrial legacy and raises important issues about how industrial heritage can be sustained in the light of national and international experience.

As part of the celebrations the Dunedin Gasworks Museum Trust is planning a series of events to commemorate the significance of this anniversary.

Two major events are planned:

1. HERITAGE IMPACT150 – Industrial Heritage SYMPOSIUM
A three-day event to be based at Otago Settlers Museum. The symposium will bring together people with expertise and an interest in industrial heritage including archaeologists, architects, archivists, curators, engineers, historians, local government leaders, planners, sociologists, and those involved in tourism, heritage maintenance and restoration.

2. GASWORKS150 – Community FESTIVAL
The festival supported by funding from the Dunedin City Council will bring together the Dunedin community to celebrate the anniversary at the Gasworks Museum. The event is in its initial planning stages and will have an art and cultural focus including a celebration of dance, art and photographic exhibitions. There will be a market day, museum open days, and a competition for senior secondary school students involving an Industrial Heritage research project.

The Call for Contributions to the Industrial Heritage Symposium HERITAGE IMPACT150 can be downloaded at www.gasworks150.org.nz

The website will be updated regularly.

What Can You Do To Help?
1. We have a wide distribution network based on our database, if you know of anyone or any organisation that may be interested in the symposium please ask them to contact us or visit www.gasworks150.org.nz
2. Talk to colleagues and help distribute news of the symposium and associated events.
3. Submit a proposal for contributions before 31 March 2013.
4. Encourage colleagues to join our newsletter list.

Contacts for further information:

SYMPOSIUM PROGRAMME
Ann Barsby
Symposium Convenor
Heritage Impact150
Phone: +64 (0)3 479 0169
ann@southernheritage.org.nz

SYMPOSIUM AND FESTIVAL ORGANISER
Craig Bush
ExcellentEvents NZ Ltd
PO Box 327, Dunedin 9054
Phone: +64 (0)3 477 8048
Mobile: 021 890 095
admin@excellentevents.co.nz

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Proposed 100m hotel: Damn right, the fight’s not over! #Dunedin

Great to see the letter by award-winning architect Richard Shackleton given prominence in the ODT today. It sent me hunting for my copy of Paul Goldberger’s book, The Skyscraper (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1982), bought in second professional year (BArch) at Auckland. Given what has happened since to skyscraper design internationally, the book is a little quaint, eclectic and short of stature – it will always be a useful commentary on the emergence and history of towers in the United States.

Most of the buildings Goldberger cites I visited on architectural study tour with a group of staff, students and friends of the Auckland School in 1984, at the start of my four-year fulltime Master of Architecture degree (thesis only). But that’s quite another rainy day story of ‘commercial facades’.

Goldberger begins his last chapter, ‘Beyond the Box’, saying:
“By 1980, one thing was clear: the box, the rationalist dream of the International Style [the austere glass box, his words], was making more and more architects uncomfortable. Not only was it no longer the clean and exhilarating structure that would serve as a clarion call to a new age, but it was not even able to hold out much promise of practicality. It was generally inefficient from the standpoint of energy, and it was not as marketable from the viewpoint of real estate operators either.”

41 Wharf Street, Dunedin
For the applicant (Betterways Advisory Ltd), architect Jeremy Whelan of Ignite Architects (Auckland) is assisting Shanghai-based ECADI (Eastern China Architectural Design Institute), who were initially engaged by the client, with the conceptual design of the proposed hotel. It is claimed in Whelan’s brief of evidence that ECADI has significant international hotel experience and has completed projects for all major 5 star brand operators including Kempinski Hotels, Four Seasons Hotels, Marriot Hotels, Ritz Carlton Hotels and the Intercontinental Hotel Group.

The design of the 27-storey hotel tower crassly proposed for one of Dunedin’s best waterfront sites is the likes of which Goldberger correctly identifies as ‘tired’ by 1980 – at the time of writing, he hadn’t yet considered Arquitectonica’s work at Miami, Florida (see the landmark 20-storey luxury Atlantis condominiums built in 1982, famous for their cutout) – but Whelan certainly had, as a BArch contemporary of mine at Auckland School, and that building too is ‘tired’ as architectural metaphors and shared language go.

[scanned]

ODT 3.1.13 Letter to the editor p12

ODT 3.1.13 Letter R Shackleton (1)

Enter hotel in the search box at right to find recent posts and comments.

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2012 Southern Architecture Awards – NZ Institute of Architects

Thom residence, Waitati (top). Otago University Union redevelopment.

### ODT Online Sat, 24 Nov 2012
Awards reflect straitened times
By Nigel Benson
Innovation in a difficult economic climate was a feature of winning designs in the 2012 Southern Architecture Awards, announced at Forsyth Barr Stadium last night. Awards were presented for seven Otago projects, ranging from public changing rooms to houses and a hotel. The design of the winning projects reflected the challenging economic conditions in New Zealand, awards convener and Dunedin architect Niko Young said last night. “Even though times are tough, client expectations remain high. This has resulted in innovative architecture produced to lean budgets,” he said. “Architects and clients doing more with less is a theme of the 2012 Southern Architecture Awards. Such an approach often involves the reworking of existing buildings.”
The judging panel comprised Mr Young, University of Otago design for technology department fellow Michael Findlay, Dunedin architect Regan Hall and Auckland architect Nicola Herbst.
Read more

██ NZIA 2012 Southern Architecture Awards – winners information, citations and more photos at NZIA website

New Zealand Institute of Architects NZIA)
The New Zealand Institute of Architects represents over 90 percent of registered architects in New Zealand, promoting and celebrating the role of architecture in enhancing the built environment.
Is my Architect a member of NZIA? (directory search)
● Find an NZIA Practice www.architecturenz.net

New Zealand Registered Architects Board (NZRAB)
– registers architects who have been assessed by their peers as competent
– confirms every five years that architects continue to be competent
– maintains an online New Zealand Architects Register
– investigates complaints and, if need be, disciplines architects.

NZRAB: Is my building designer a Registered Architect?
The New Zealand Architects Register
Find an Architect

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