Tag Archives: Archaeological sites

Cr Hilary Calvert, an embarrassment

Only the day before the Winkle tried to “separate” DEBT from the STADIUM. She would do better sentenced to hard labour than try busting the rocks of the Autonomous Crown Entity, Heritage New Zealand —because she sure as hell won’t win.

The Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014 makes it unlawful for any person to modify or destroy, or cause to be modified or destroyed, the whole or any part of an archaeological site without the prior authority of Heritage New Zealand. Those wishing to do any work that may affect an archaeological site must obtain an authority from Heritage New Zealand before they begin.

http://www.heritage.org.nz/protecting-heritage/archaeology
Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014
s87 Offence of modifying or destroying archaeological site

Hilary Calvert1 [3news.co.nz]### ODT Online
Wed, 26 Nov 2014
Anger at Pol Pot remark
By Chris Morris
A Dunedin city councillor who compared Heritage New Zealand with the leader of the Khmer Rouge has been forced to beat a hasty retreat.
Cr Hilary Calvert made the comment as councillors discussed Heritage New Zealand’s desire to protect the old sea wall running alongside Portobello Rd on Otago Peninsula. […] on hearing Heritage New Zealand would likely want to see older sections of the wall protected, beneath a new one, Cr Calvert said the council should not be “asking their permission”. Read more

“We are being held to ransom by this Pol Pot-ish approach, aren’t we?” —Calvert [The Clueless]

Report – ISC – 25/11/2014 (PDF, 86.4 KB)
Peninsula Roading Acceleration Update

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: 3news.co.nz – Hilary Calvert

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Filed under Construction, Cycle network, DCC, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Heritage NZ, Hot air, Media, Name, New Zealand, NZHPT, NZTA, People, Pics, Politics, Project management, Site, What stadium

Christchurch heritage buildings approved for demolition #eqnz

Canterbury Earthquake
Media advisory – Tuesday 15 March 2011, 1930 hours

Process for approving deconstruction
In the case of heritage buildings, a robust process is followed that involves an assessment by Heritage and by Lifelines (utilities) and an inspection carried out by a suitably qualified engineer.
Every endeavour is being made to contact all owners of buildings if demolition or deconstruction is necessary.
There will be no salvaging of materials in buildings unless it is by the building owner or those contracted to carry out salvage work.

Heritage buildings approved for deconstruction
* Provincial Hotel – 274 Cashel Street
* 112 Centaurus Road – Dwelling
* Cathedral Grammar – Chester Street West 8 (2), Stratham Building
* Austral Building – 603 – 615 Colombo Street (includes 170 Tuam Street)
* Bean Bags and Beyond – 626 (aka 626) Colombo Street
* 625 – 629 Colombo Street – Commercial buildings
* Wave House/Winnie Bagoes – 194 Gloucester Street
* Hereford Court – 116 Hereford
* Piko Whole Foods – 229 Kilmore Street
* Park Lane Handbags – 111 – 113 Lichfield Street
* Former Ridley Building – 116 Lichfield Street
* Nurse Maude – 192 Madras Street
* Charlie Backpacker – 268 Madras Street
* Former City Council Offices – 198 Manchester Street
* Forbes Building – 17 Norwich Quay 17, Lyttleton
* Rhodes Memorial Hospital – Overdale Drive 2
* Edison Hall, Workshop, Witchery – 230 – 232 Tuam St
* Domo – 236 Tuam St
* Fuller Brothers Ltd – 180 Tuam Street
* Addington Flour Mill – 14 Wise Street
* Gopals Restaurant and Pedros Restaurant – 143 Worcester Street

This totals 21 buildings, but note that Colombo Street’s Austral Building also includes 170 Tuam Street and there are multiple buildings included in the Colombo Street addresses
NB: This list differs slightly from the list provided at the media briefing today.

Deconstruction of Addington (aka Old Woods) Flour Mill, 14 Wise St
This deconstruction was triggered by USAR, who recommended the partial or total deconstruction of the building for rescue or recovery purposes or because it presents an unacceptable safety risk from aftershocks.
There are three separate buildings on site that were assessed:

* the mill building itself that has the greatest heritage value,
* a chimney, and
* a brick-clad silos assessed as having a lesser heritage value.

The silos and chimney were badly damaged. The mill building itself was assessed as repairable. The engineer’s report recommended the deconstruction of the silos and the chimney only.
This approved deconstruction sign-off process was followed in this case and the recommendation provided to the National Controller for approval/signature on March 3.

Weblink

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Photograph of quake-damaged Addington mill building
By @Motmunter, Campbell Live cameraman

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

13 Comments

Filed under #eqnz, Architecture, Construction, Design, Economics, Geography, Heritage, Politics, Project management, Site, Town planning, Urban design

D Scene – Kerbside collections, coastal erosion, Lovelock Avenue

### D Scene 16-12-09

Cost of bins set to be included (page 2)
By Wilma McCorkindale
New kerbside collection companies will include the cost of new recycling bins in contracts if the Dunedin City Council gets its way. The council’s preference is that the contractor owns the bins.
{continues}

Council discussing multiple tenders (page 2)
By Wilma McCorkindale
Multiple tenders for Dunedin’s kerbside collection have been discussed by the Dunedin City Council. More than one tender could be let under the council’s new kerbside collections scheme approved on Monday.
{continues}

Register to read D Scene online at http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

Sand erosion exposing history (page 13)
By Wilma McCorkindale
Erosion of sand was steadily uncovering dozens of archaeological sites from Moeraki in the north to sites as far south as the mouth of the Clutha River. People who stole from sites were possibly unaware they were breaking the Antiquities Act.
{continues}

Talk: Dunedin on Dunedin
Your say: Letters to the editor (page 14)
Battle over Lovelock Avenue
Letters by Islay Little (Dunedin), Gavin MacDonald (St Kilda)

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Further to the item in D Scene about coastal erosion uncovering archaeological sites and artifacts, the following information is found at the New Zealand Historic Places Trust website.

www.historic.org.nz

Maori Heritage
Nga Taonga Tuku Iho no Nga Tupuna

Maori heritage can be described as nga taonga tuku iho no nga tupuna = treasures handed down by our ancestors.
It comprises a wide range of different places and items from the physical and tangible to the natural environment and the intangible. For the purposes of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust’s responsibilities, cultural heritage excludes te reo, performing arts, most portable taonga, radio waves, etc.
Maori heritage can be divided into the physical/tangible, natural and intangible. More

Legal Protection of Archaeological Sites
The Historic Places Act 1993 makes it unlawful for any person to destroy, damage or modify the whole or any part of an archaeological site without the prior authority of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust. This is the case regardless of whether the land on which the site is located is designated, or the activity is permitted under the District or Regional Plan or a resource or building consent has been granted, the Act also provides for substantial penalties for unauthorised destruction, damage or modification.
Archaeological sites are an irreplaceable part of our heritage and although our history is short, it is rich, varied and unique, and belongs to all New Zealanders. What we discover from archaeological sites helps us to better understand our past and to learn from it. The NZHPT takes compliance seriously, and the Historic Places Act has strong provisions for non-compliance. More

Answers to commonly asked questions are provided in this brochure (pdf 285kb). If you have other questions please call the Regional Archaeologist in the NZHPT office nearest you.

Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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