Tag Archives: Archaeological Authority

Prista Apartments Ltd: vulgar design, weak facadism, dog of a new infill to street #compromise

COULD HAVE BEEN A LOT WORSE

DCC reference: LUC-2008-580
Decision: DCC granted resource consent to Prista Apartments Ltd (applicant)
Subject site: 372-392 Princes Street and 11 Stafford Street, Dunedin

Historic heritage and precinct matters:
● District Plan listed facades for protection: 372-392 Princes Street
● District Plan listed South Princes Street Townscape Precinct (TH04)

Environment Court Appeal: Lodged by New Zealand Historic Places Trust on 5 October 2010. Subsequently, Elizabeth Kerr and Peter Entwisle registered as RMA s274 parties to appeal.

————–

LATEST IN BRIEF
After considerable delays, caucusing between the parties has resulted in a Consent Order from the Environment Court, such that there is:

● protection for only three existing heritage building facades to Princes Street (380, 386 and 392);
● one new façade (372 Princes Street) directly to street for new commercial building at 372-392 Princes Street (comprising apartments, retail and internal parking);
● one new commercial building to 11 Stafford Street;
● monitor against damage to historic Empire Hotel south of the application site; and
● site redevelopment at 372-392 Princes Street (including pre-1900 bread ovens at 392 Princes Street) subject to separate archaeological authority process.

Consent lapse date: 1 July 2021
No DCC-imposed bond required of the developer, Prista Apartments Ltd.

[Building colour and signage require separate resource consent.]

The following Consent Order is the culmination of a protracted process of negotiation between the parties New Zealand Historic Places Trust (Appellant), Dunedin City Council (Respondent) and the Applicant, Prista Apartments Ltd (Luke Dirkzwager of Christchurch).

Consent Order 26.6.14 (PDF, 748 KB)

Indicative renderings by Fulton Ross Team Architects, Christchurch show approximate bulk, scale and architectural treatment (December 2013) — at first floor level immediately above the verandah the building facades mask car parking, resulting in an obvious strip of dead window space:

PristaApartments (Consent Order 26.6.14) 2

PristaApartments (Consent Order 26.6.14)

Was it a frustrating anger-inducing process to get to this COMPROMISE ???
You betcha, for All concerned. Especially against the receiving environment at Dunedin where local developers and property investors hold a substantially different view to building conservation, sense of place, and sympathetic adaptive reuse for contemporary and future ownership, tenanting and business opportunities. However, all that is Cut Dead at this particular spot in Princes Street by a Christchurch personality who appears to be in no rush to build.
His buildings must remain safe and pose no threat to the general public in the meantime.

Prista Apartments 372-392 Princes St, Dunedin (IMG_8407a1)

JGillies schematic architectural history (2a)

Related Posts and Comments:
4.3.11 Reaction to another instance of unthinking ad-hocism from City Hall
15.9.10 Prista Apartments: Resource consent Decision + Appeal
4.5.10 Prista Apartments: Dunedin’s goldrush-era heritage won’t fall over…
24.1.10 Prista Apartments: 372-392 Princes St and 11 Stafford St

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Owners of neglected buildings


[Thumbnails: ODT Files]

There are no surprises about the requirements on the separate owners of the Barron Building, N. & E.S. Paterson Building and Brocklebanks Building. Following the structural failure of parts of their buildings, for which the owners are responsible, the owners have been fully informed of their obligations. Further, had they acted earlier, as good stewards, to have their buildings structurally assessed and strengthened all that has passed since could have been avoided. All three buildings are located in District Plan listed townscape precincts. The Brocklebanks Building has a District Plan protected facade to King Edward St.

### ODT Online Tue, 8 May 2012
A ‘nightmare’ waiting to have collapsed buildings demolished
By Allison Rudd
The owners of two unstable 19th-century Dunedin buildings say they cannot believe how long it is taking to demolish them. Lincoln Darling, owner of the Barron Building in Rattray St, which partly collapsed in January last year, said yesterday he “didn’t realise there was so much red tape involved” in demolishing a building. Norma Brocklebank, co-owner of the Brocklebank Dry Cleaners building in King Edward St, South Dunedin, said yesterday waiting so long to demolish her building when its facade was ruled almost a year ago to be in immediate danger of collapsing and the building condemned had been a “nightmare”.

Mr Darling and Scenic Circle Hotel Group director Stuart McLauchlan said yesterday the demolition of their buildings was imminent. A contractor had been given the go-ahead to proceed and demolition could not happen soon enough, Mr McLauchlan said.

Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Expedience: Dunedin City Council’s blunt instrument to demolish listed buildings

Resource Consent Application: LUC-2011-567
191 King Edward Street, Dunedin

Senior planner Campbell Thomson addressing the Applicant on behalf of the Dunedin City Council as at 27 January 2012, writes:

[excerpt, page 1]
“Your application for land use consent for the demolition of an existing building listed in Schedule 25.1 of the District Plan and located within a townscape precinct, at 191 King Edward Street, Dunedin, was processed on a non-notified basis in accordance with sections 95A to 95F of the Resource Management Act 1991. The application was considered by a Senior Planner under delegated authority on 27 January 2012.

“I advise that the Council has granted consent to the application with conditions. The decision and condition are shown on the attached certificate.”

Under ‘Planning Assessment’, Mr Thomson states:

[excerpt, page 3]
Affected Persons
No written consents were submitted with the application. No parties are considered to be adversely affected by this proposal for the reasons outlined below in the section headed Effects on the Environment. It is noted that the New Zealand Historic Places Trust were consulted as a Statutory Body with an interest in the proposal. Their concerns will be addressed through the requirement for an Archaeological Authority which applies to the proposal. There are no special circumstances which warrant notification of this application. While demolition of heritage or townscape buildings generally raises issues of public interest, in this case, the structural condition of the building has reached a state whereby removal of the building façade has become necessary as a matter of public safety. The key environmental issue relevant to this proposal is how to mitigate the loss of the building.”

It is unreasonable and erroneous, in the context provided by the letter writer, for the Dunedin City Council to state that “the New Zealand Historic Places Trust were consulted”.

It is unreasonable and erroneous of the Council to claim “No parties are considered to be adversely affected by this proposal”, supported by following paragraphs that do not mitigate the wrongfulness of the unjust premise.

The letter granting consent carries other instances of pomposity and disregard for due process. Where does natural justice fit?

This forum isn’t the appropriate place to debate glaring technicalities, in light of what ‘affected party’ status requires as a burden of care on the part of the Dunedin City Council. Suffice to say, the Council is telling porkies.

Furthermore, the Dunedin City Council cannot hope to reduce or limit the work, powers and functions of the autonomous Crown Entity, New Zealand Historic Places Trust, empowered under the Historic Places Act 1993, to just that of regulatory responsibilities regarding archaeological sites — for the Council’s own undemocratic purposes.

Certainly, not by Mr Thomson’s convenient slip of the Council’s red pen.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

### D Scene 22.2.12
Opinion: Protecting heritage (page 7)
By Owen Graham
When is a heritage building protected, and when is it not? That question is one that deserves closer attention as the effects of building neglect become more apparent in our city. In the coming months more gaps will occur in our city heritage precincts, particularly with buildings in Rattray St and King Edward St being readied for demolition. They were not damaged by earthquakes, rather by successive owners who have opted to diminish their attractiveness, economic viability and historical significance in what ultimately results in demolition by neglect. {continues} #bookmark

• Owen Graham is the New Zealand Historic Places Trust area manager (Otago/Southland)

Register to read D Scene online at
http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

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Rattray St buildings up for full demolition say McLauchlan and Darling

Bulldozer-city tactics again, Boys? Look what happened to the bluestone wall in the High Street car park, to be retained by conditions of an archaeological authority—last photographed by ODT this summer, in a state of neglect with weeds all over it (having been ‘nudged’ with an excavator during construction of the car park). That should have been a prosecution. Not sure you can get off the same hook twice.

### ODT Online Tue, 31 Jan 2012
Demolition set to resume, but HPT says authority required
By Debbie Porteous
Demolition work is due to restart soon on on two adjoining buildings in Rattray St, Dunedin, more than a year after the roof of one of them, the 136-year-old [Barron] building, collapsed. Stuart McLauchlan, a director of the Scenic Circle Hotel Group, which owns the N. & E.S. Paterson building beside the [Barron] building, confirmed yesterday that demolition on the two buildings, which share a common wall, should begin within in the next few weeks. But the Historic Places Trust says an archeological authority needs to be done, at least on the [Barron] building, before any demolition work begins.
Read more

Urban blight in the hands of expensive men.

People love *cough* the frontage to Scenic Circle’s High Street car park (here seen from behind) – the architect more than completely failed. More joy for Rattray Street if this model is followed; the High Street car park is one of the worst pot-holing disasters in the central city. Not a desirable neighbour for the earthquake-strengthened and fully refurbished historic Bing Harris building across the street.

Not known for his good taste,
“Mr McLauchlan said the section where the N. & E.S. Paterson building stood would be turned into a car park, and an entrance built with a facade similar to that of the other entrance to the car park, in High St.”

The Southern Cross (now owned by the Scenic Circle Hotel Group) greatly enhanced the townscape appearance of Rattray St in the twentieth century. Tui. [Since this shot was taken the Barron building has been lowered to two floors only, and the roof of the N. & E.S. Paterson building has been removed.]

The buildings for demolition at 173 and 175 Rattray St are both located in the North Princes Street/Moray Place/Exchange Townscape Precinct (TH03).

Related Posts:
8.5.12 Owners of neglected buildings
12.4.11 Public outrage – SHAME on those re$pon$ible for building neglect
4.3.11 Reaction to another instance of unthinking ad-hocism from City Hall
19.2.11 Owner of Dragon Café/Barron Building has lodged an application…
26.1.11 D Scene: Honour heritage
22.1.11 SAVE Dragon Café / Barron Building – Sign the Online Petition
13.1.11 Barron Building and Rattray Street
13.1.11 Banks, Barron & Co Building Collapse pics

25.8.11 180 Rattray St, Dunedin: Proposed historic building demolition…

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Demo by neglect? Save the facade?

Updated.

### ODT Online Thu, 13 Jan 2011
Building’s fate in doubt after parapets collapse
By Chris Morris
The fate of one of central Dunedin’s oldest commercial buildings hangs in the balance after two separate sections collapsed in clouds of crumbling masonry within hours of each other yesterday.
Read more

### ODT Online Thu, 13 Jan 2011
Tears over wrecked ‘second home’
By Chris Morris
A pile of smashed masonry and timber was enough to bring tears to the eyes of Dragon Cafe waitress Lyn Kennedy in Dunedin yesterday. The central city cafe – an institution since opening in 1958 – had become Ms Kennedy’s “second home” since she began work there as a waitress in 1961.
Read more

****

12 January 2010. This morning the roof collapsed of the 1875 brick building housing the well-known late night eaterie, Dragon Cafe, at 175 Rattray Street, Dunedin. By the afternoon the facade parapet had also collapsed, destroying the verandah below. What if? awaits council updates on the condition of the central city building.

### radionz.co.nz Updated at 1:48pm on 12 January 2011
Collapse of building in Dunedin
Parts of Rattray Street will be closed for most of Wednesday. Dunedin City Council says power has now been returned to buildings in Rattray Street, except for the one that collapsed.
The council says it advised the owner of the building earlier this week, to have it looked at by an engineer.
Read more

@five15design I was at the Southern Cross at the weekend and noticed the #DragonCafe parapet was looking ominously cracked
(via @JohnAshcroft, 7 hours ago)

### 3news.co.nz Wed, 12 Jan 2011 6:20p.m.
Collapse could force closure of iconic diner
By Annabelle Jackman
Part of a historic building has collapsed in central Dunedin, forcing the evacuation of two hotels and a number of businesses.By midday work had begun to stabilise loose bricks. Hopes rose that the building might be salvageable, but the latest collapse is making the future of one of Dunedin’s oldest commercial buildings far from certain. But the Dragon may be lucky – further engineering assessments will be carried out in the coming weeks and the building’s future decided then.
Read more + Video

### ODT Online Wed, 12 Jan 2011
Roof cave-in closes Dunedin cafe
Dunedin’s Dragon Cafe could be closed for several weeks after parapets above it started collapsing this morning.
Read more

Post and photographs by Elizabeth Kerr

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