Tag Archives: All Blacks

Rugby dying : Takers still gonna take

Rugby - Tom Scott, September 12. 2015 - Over the top 13618192 [Stuff.co.nz][Stuff.co.nz]

Received from Alex Brown
Wed, 1 June 2016 at 7:35 pm

It may be time for us to face the fact that we’re no longer who we think we are.

### Stuff.co.nz Last updated 05:00, May 31 2016
Cas Carter: If rugby’s just a sport, is NZ’s national identity at stake?
By Cas Carter
OPINION Our image as a hard core rugby loving nation is under threat. Last week rugby bosses launched a rescue strategy to revive the sport which is no longer number one in Auckland. Only 3 per cent there now play our national game and there are fears this trend could spread across the country. It’s been on the cards for a while. Increasing ethnic diversity in Auckland, concern over injury and a rising number of sporting options are all at play. But this isn’t just an issue for rugby. Our national identity is at stake.
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Rugby - Tom Scott, October 31, 2015 13618192 [Stuff.co.nz][Stuff.co.nz]

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NZRU ‘hustles’ towns and cities to build stadiums

What happens to our cathedrals, the large stadiums found in every major centre, if we lose faith?

### stuff.co.nz Last updated 05:00 14/06/2014
Sport
What about the state of New Zealand stadiums?
By Matt Nippert
[Excerpts from a longer article…] The covered 31,000-seat Forsyth Barr Stadium in Dunedin, constructed in time for the 2011 Rugby World Cup, may be the newest major sporting facility in the country but has already proved the most controversial. The bulk of its $224 million construction cost came from Dunedin City Council, but ongoing costs to ratepayers have caused considerable angst. Ratepayers were forced into a $2.3m bailout in May, and are mulling whether a permanent annual subsidy will be required to keep it running.

Getting to grips with exactly how much stadiums cost is a tricky exercise. Construction has often been piecemeal, with grandstands redeveloped or rebuilt over time, blurring total capital expenditure. And determining operational costs – whether stadiums require ongoing contributions by ratepayers – is further complicated by many facilities being run from within city councils or by council-controlled organisations. This makes the extraction of a discrete set of accounts, most notably in Dunedin and Waikato, an impossibility.

Analysis of accounts for Wellington and Auckland, run by dedicated trusts and two of the most transparent stadiums, shows that break-even is realistically the best case.

At New Zealand Rugby headquarters, chief executive Steve Tew broadly agrees that the glory days [of attendance at games] are over. Viewers watching broadcasts of a game have supplanted punters going through stadium turnstiles.

But there is one niche where the faith of the rugby faithful remains strong: All Blacks tests. Hosting the national team is often the only time stadiums up and down the country reach capacity.

While great for New Zealand Rugby coffers, Massey University’s Sam Richardson says the All Blacks have warped stadium construction priorities. “It’s an absolutely huge detriment. If you’re building a stadium where the financial viability year to year relies on an All Blacks test, there’s no question New Zealand Rugby plays a massive part in whether these facilities are going to be used to their potential,” he says.

Canterbury University economist Eric Crampton says building capacity for a solitary annual All Black test is akin to “buying a six-bedroom house just in case both sets of grandparents come to visit at the same time”. Crampton says the proliferation of large loss-making stadiums, both in New Zealand and worldwide, has been mainly because of the economic equivalent of hustling. “Sporting teams have been able to convince councils all over the place – and have been able to play them off against each other by threatening to move – to build excessive stadiums.
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“Fifa, like the International Olympic Committee, is widely regarded as corrupt. In that, it reflects our flawed species; while capable of fabulous feats, a dark side lurks.”

### ODT Online Sat, 14 Jun 2014
Editorial: Revelling in sport
OPINION As Dunedin and the South gear up for the excitement of tonight’s rugby test in the city, a sporting event in another league entirely kicked off yesterday.
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Garrick Tremain – 14 June 2015

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Debate over new stadium

CHRISTCHURCH —This means to see the All Blacks play at home against the best opposition, we have to build a stadium that is almost double the size of what we really need just for one event per annum.

Proposed stadium, Christchurch (Stuff 10.5.13) screenshotChristchurch Stadium concept by architect Thom Craig of AMO Design

The former chief executive of the council-owned VBase events management operation, now working in the private sector, offers his perspective on the debate about a new stadium for Christchurch.

### stuff.co.nz Last updated 08:39 10/05/2013
Opinion
‘Boutique’ stadium a better option
By Bryan Pearson
I follow the various discussions around stadiums and venues with interest, and thought that the following might help inform that debate. The most recent issue to surface in this debate is about co-location versus integration. If we are simply co-locating other facilities like offices, hotels, and so on, adjacent to the stadium (as shown in the design where there are standalone buildings at each end of the stadium itself) then, while it will add life and activity to the stadium precinct, it will have little if any impact on the stadium business case.

If we are talking about integrated facilities and design which reduce the cost of building the stadium and/or deliver non-event regular income streams for the same cost/investment, then it will improve the stadium business case.

The latter sounds attractive until you start to consider the operational challenges of fully integrated facilities where the 24/7 tenants are effectively displaced on event days. Of course, then there is the issue of supply and demand for commercial office space and accommodation. Already we are seeing large city fringe commercial developments (Victoria St, Lincoln Rd). Then there is the central city where some developments are under way but many developers are already struggling to build the business case due to high costs of construction and soft demand once you get beyond about $400 per square metre.
So where will office space adjacent to the stadium fit in a market which is already showing signs of weakness and over-supply? The reality is the only thing that truly impacts on stadium viability is commercial event days.
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Weak boys, Cull and Burden on rugby stadium

One year on from the All Blacks winning the World Cup at Eden Park, what is the state of rugby at the so-called “Stadium of Four Million”? APNZ reporters Patrick McKendry, Daniel Richardson and Matthew Backhouse investigate.

### nzherald.co.nz 4:16 PM Friday Oct 19, 2012
Sport
Rugby: What is the state of our game?
By Matthew Backhouse, Patrick McKendry, Daniel Richardson
Andrew Maddock will be at EcoLight Stadium in Pukekohe early today for Counties-Manukau’s biggest game of the season, an ITM Cup semifinal against Southland. The Counties Rugby Union chief executive will be at work about 8am for a game which kicks off at 2.05pm and which he expects will attract only 4000-5000 spectators. “It’s a little bit hard to know as it’s Labour Weekend,” he says. “That for us is a reasonable crowd because we’re a pretty small community.” When that match kicks off the All Blacks will be preparing for tonight’s Bledisloe Cup match against the Wallabies in Brisbane which will attract a full house of more than 50,000 to Suncorp Stadium and a worldwide audience of millions. Such is the divide in New Zealand rugby, a ravine growing by the year despite, or perhaps because of, the All Blacks’ success in the World Cup, which on Tuesday will be exactly 12 months ago.

Mr Cull says there was a great atmosphere during the tournament, but whether that justified the expenditure was another matter.

One year on from the Rugby World Cup, the tournament’s costly and sometimes controversial stadium projects have left a legacy of ongoing debt and questions over their future.[…]For NZRU chief executive Steve Tew, the World Cup’s legacy is a positive one, despite doubts remaining over Eden Park which had a massive overhaul before the tournament and now mostly sits empty apart from when the All Blacks play there.

“We’ve got a sound platform to build on going forward. Of course there are significant challenges ahead financially, but when I look to the future events that we’ve got coming up, the events calender is looking pretty robust.” -Darren Burden, DVML

Dunedin’s Forsyth Barr Stadium is struggling to attract the big events it needs to remain financially viable, while Auckland’s revamped Eden Park has been dragged into a review of the city’s stadiums as it looks to shake off $55 million in debt. Critics say the tournament failed to deliver on its promised financial returns and are questioning the long-terms gains of the $555m spent nationally on upgrading stadiums. – APNZ
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Dunedin’s Carisbrook

Tweet:

@10PARK All this garbage in ODT about ‘consigning Carisbrook to history’. There is NO demolition order. The ground is still *backup* for RWC 2011.

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### ODT Online Sat, 19 Jun 2010
Editorial: The beloved ‘Brook
When a South Dunedin swamp first became a sports ground, no-one could have predicted Carisbrook’s eminent future. No-one could have imagined Carisbrook as one of the world’s rugby cathedrals, as the focal point for rugby and cricket in Otago, as a field of drama and dreams. The time has come for this special old lady of New Zealand sport to retire as a premier home of All Black rugby. The Silver Fern, the All Black haka, the national anthem and the test matches themselves will, by about 9.15pm today, be consigned to history.

What a life she’s lived – from gestation with the Carisbrook cricket club in 1874, to the first major event when Otago met Tasmania in cricket in 1884, to the first rugby international two years later when New South Wales lost to Otago, to 1906 when the Otago Rugby Football Union bought the lease, to the first test (against the Anglo-Welsh) in 1908.

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### ODT Online Sat, 19 Jun 2010
Rugby: Ground’s place in rugby history secure
By Brent Edwards
Few people have seen more test rugby at Carisbrook than Brent Edwards. The columnist and former long-serving Otago Daily Times sports editor looks back on some famous games at a famous ground. There are much bigger and better rugby stadiums around the world but few which evoke the passion and nostalgia of Carisbrook. It’s a no-frills name and a no-nonsense ground. It’s smaller than most, the facilities are basic yet it fairly drips with rugby heritage.

I’ve been fortunate to watch all the [Carisbrook] tests in the past 51 years. My father, uncle, cousins and I queued from 9am. Many on the terrace fainted, many vertically challenged patrons saw little of the play, but the experience was unforgettable.

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### ODT Online Sat, 19 Jun 2010
Rugby: All Black history at Carisbrook
By Hayden Meikle
Thirty-six All Black tests have been played at Carisbrook since the first in 1908. Sports editor Hayden Meikle looks back on a century of All Black highs and lows at Dunedin’s famous ground.
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Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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[small print] “if” it opens on time…

### ODT Online Thu, 17 Jun 2010
Rugby: Backing for ABs to play at stadium opening
By Alistair McMurran
Assistant coach Wayne Smith wants the All Blacks to be part of the official opening of the Forsyth Barr Stadium next year. Smith and members of the All Back team had a look at the stadium site yesterday.

At this stage, the plan is for the new stadium to be completed by early August next year. That would allow it to be used for the three Rugby World Cup games in Dunedin the following month. The window of opportunity for an All Black test is probably too small, as the Tri-Nations will be reduced next year and, barring a change in policy, Dunedin is not seen as a suitable venue for a Bledisloe Cup test.

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Post by Elizabeth Kerr

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D Scene promotes rugby test

Edith Notman’s letter to D Scene puts its first year of publication into sharp relief. Not flattering, enough said.

### D Scene 10-6-09 (page 3)
Sales aren’t freezing
By Ryan Keen, editor
…the rugby test this Saturday is heading for a sell-out. By deadline yesterday just 550 tickets remained and Otago rugby marketing boss Chris Green was confident they’d be snapped up (see story, p16). It’s a testament to this city’s healthy appetite for test rugby and hopefully it is rewarded with another big one scheduled at Carisbrook next year by rugby bosses…
{continues}

Register to read D Scene online at http://fairfaxmedia.newspaperdirect.com/

### D Scene 10-6-09 (page 5)
Stadium funding: Council’s roof millions
Pay to put a lid on it
By Michelle Sutton
Otago Regional Council wants its $37.5 million stadium contribution spent on putting a lid on the controversial project – with its first payment to Dunedin City Council expected to be made in August… Construction of the roof will start once the north and south stands are finished, expected to be by the middle of next year.
{continues}

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### D Scene 10-6-09 (pages 16-17)
All Blacks v France, Carisbrook, Saturday June 13, 7.35pm

(page 16 stories)
Sell-out crowd will boost 2010 test bid
Is Captain Mils a better centre?
City ready to party
North end late-night dining

[Lousy trouble at Octagon…] Beth Connor, owner of Ra Bar and Isis Lounge: “We’ve ordered double the amount of alcohol than normal.”

[Cruisy atmosphere, New Edinburgh Way, George Street] Dan Chin, owner of Robert Burns Pub: “We thought we’d go down the track of promoting responsible dining and drinking post-game.”

(page 17 stories)
Tell him he’s dreaming
French Kiss
French connections

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