Tag Archives: Adaptive re-use

Dunedin Heritage Re-use Awards @Wall Street mall

This year’s Dunedin Heritage Re-use Award winners will be announced later this week at Wall Street mall.

The Awards celebrate excellence, innovation and sensitivity in the re-use of heritage buildings in Dunedin and include categories for earthquake strengthening, interiors and overall re-use. A student design competition is also held during the year, which challenges students to develop innovative solutions to the re-use of Dunedin’s older buildings.

If not invited to the Awards Ceremony check out the exhibition during shop hours. The board display is located near Marbecks cafe and the Lifts at Wall Street. [● Inconveniently. the exhibition closed on the night of the Awards, Wednesday 26 March]

Enticements. Here’s a selection of student ‘re-use’ studies for the Athenaeum in the lower Octagon, taken by cameraphone on Friday. The building is owned by entrepreneur Lawrie Forbes.

Athenaeum IMG_20140321_141658-1Athenaeum IMG_20140321_141458-1Athenaeum IMG_20140321_142640Athenaeum IMG_20140321_142906Athenaeum IMG_20140321_141614-1Love the (lowrise) tower, it accents the building successfully for functional and community use.

The Awards are judged by a panel that includes Dunedin City Councillors, representatives from the New Zealand Historic Places Trust, the local branch of the New Zealand Institute of Architects and the Institute of Professional Engineers of New Zealand, and building owners.

█ This year’s Award winners are revealed here.
The names of last year’s Award winners are listed here.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Growth fetish ? Urban sprawl v Higher density living ?

### onenesspublishing.com March 20, 2013
Urban sprawl isn’t to blame: unsustainable cities are the product of growth fetish
By Brendan Gleeson
In a recent article on The Conversation Robert Nelson argues we are all morally culpable for unsustainable urban sprawl. He goes on to suggest we fix this by taking advantage of opportunities for higher density development in sparsely populated inner suburbs. But his argument is based on a false opposition: mounting evidence shows that high density development in inner areas performs very poorly in terms of resource consumption and greenhouse emissions. The idea that outer suburbs are inherently less sustainable than inner ones doesn’t bear scrutiny. The key question is not where we accommodate growth; it’s our slavish pursuit of growth itself.
Read more

● Brendan Gleeson is Professor in Urban Policy Studies at University of Melbourne.

The Conversation hosts in-depth analysis, research, news and ideas from leading academics and researchers.

Urban Expansion shutterstock.com

Read two articles by Robert Nelson at The Conversation:

The grass isn’t greener in the outer ‘burbs (7 March 2013, 6.43am AEST)
“For a long a time real estate close to the palace was socially desirable, and anyone with aspirations didn’t want to know about the rest. Today in Melbourne inner-city people are embarrassed to reveal knowledge of the outer suburbs such as South Morang, like 17th century Parisians who would mispronounce the street-names of poorer areas or affect not to know them at all. Throughout history, the distribution of wealth has had a geographical expression. Snobbery, however, is only part of the challenge of urban geography. Power and privilege are concentrated within 10kms of the city centre.”

The devaluing dream; why Australian suburbia is an economic disaster (11 January 2012, 6.22am AEST)
“In spite of what everyone believes through natural pride and vanity, the family house is an asset that depreciates. Don’t be deceived that the value of property goes up and up, which of course it does. The rising prices are caused by the land becoming more expensive, not the house itself.”

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

*Image: shutterstock.com – urban expansion

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Dunedin Heritage Re-use Awards

The winners of Dunedin’s annual Heritage Re-use Awards were announced last night at a ceremony at Wall Street.

Dunedin City Council – Media Release
20 Mar 2013

Dunedin Heritage Re-use Award Winners Announced

The overall winner this year was the NMA building in Water Street, Dunedin, which also won the interiors section for the Psychology Associates Offices.

This is the third year of the awards, which celebrate excellence, innovation and sensitivity in the re-use of heritage buildings in Dunedin and include categories for earthquake strengthening, interiors and overall re-use. A student design competition is also held during the year, which challenges students to develop innovative solutions to the re-use of Dunedin’s older buildings. The awards and competition are an initiative of the Dunedin Heritage Buildings Re-use Steering Group.

The awards are judged by a panel including Dunedin City Councillors, representatives from the New Zealand Historic Places Trust, the local branch of the New Zealand Institute of Architects and the Institute of Professional Engineers of New Zealand, and building owners.

Mayor of Dunedin Dave Cull sees the awards “as acknowledging the efforts of those who strive to maintain and enhance the unique heritage character of Dunedin”.

Cr Lee Vandervis, who headed the building judging panel, says both of the two main winners – the NMA Building and Knox College – “showed remarkably imaginative and cost-effective solutions to earthquake strengthening while retaining all practicable heritage features.

“The NMA building has been turned from a unused liability into a delightfully revealed cornerstone of Dunedin history with superb creation of character spaces ideal for its new tenants. Knox College has been a large extraordinary earthquake strengthening project shoe-horned into the tightest of time frames without compromising heritage features and still managing to maintain a very sensitive level of attention to detail.”

Cr Jinty MacTavish says the two winning entries in the student design competition “demonstrated a clear commitment to retaining and showcasing key heritage features, while at the same time addressing the practical needs of well-defined anchor tenants.”

Judges in this category were for a second year running impressed with the work of Peter Rozecki-Lewis, who also took out the top honours in this category in 2012.

Nominations for next year’s awards can be made any time before 20 December. Further details are available at www.dunedin.govt.nz/heritage

WINNERS

Oakwood Properties Earthquake Strengthening Award
Sean O’Neill – Hanlon and Partners for Knox College

Barlow Justice/New Zealand Historic Places Trust Heritage Interiors Award
Psychology Associates Offices, NMA Building

Dunedin Heritage Re-use Award
NMA Building, Water Street

Dunedin Heritage Re-use Design Competition
Individual winner: Peter Rozecki-Lewis
Team winner: Laura Hughes and Campbell McNeill

Highly Commended:
Dunedin Heritage Re-use Award
Otago Settlers Museum

Contact Policy Planner (Heritage) on 477 4000.

DCC Link

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Town Hall, Dunedin Centre, Municipal Chambers #linked

Dunedin Town Hall (Municipal Chambers) 3Strengthened and up to code, pity about the debt – and DVML

### ODT Online Thu, 7 Mar 2013
RSA choir to ‘open’ town hall on Anzac Day
By Debbie Porteous
After nearly three years and more than $45 million spent on restorations and improvements, Dunedin’s town hall and neighbouring Dunedin Centre are scheduled to reopen next month. And on April 25, a group with long links to the venue, the Dunedin RSA Choir, will be the first to perform there. Choir member David More said they were looking forward to returning to the town hall with their Anzac Day Revue. ”Norma”, the town hall organ, was protected and had fans removed and replaced, but was not otherwise touched during the project, which included work on the town hall, Glenroy auditorium and municipal chambers.

● Contractors would be busy getting the centre ready for handing over to council-owned venue management company Dunedin Venues Ltd by April 5.
● The centre will be officially reopened at a civic reception on April 24.

Read more

Dunedin Town Hall Burton Bros tepapacollections 4Dunedin Town Hall, Burton Bros (Te Papa Collections)

History and significance?
Read the Heritage New Zealand (HNZ) – Registration Reports:
Municipal Chambers – Category 1 (List No. 2197)
Dunedin Town Hall and Concert Chamber – Category 2 (List No. 2150)

Related Posts and Comments:
6.2.12 Ownership and management of the Dunedin Town Hall complex…
2.11.12 Community halls of small-town New Zealand
15.3.11 Cr Dave Cull speech to Town Hall Meeting
21.1.11 DCC opens controversy on Town Hall upgrade, again!
21.7.10 DCC Media Release – Contract let for Town Hall upgrade
2.7.09 Town Hall: Glazed cube and square for Moray Place
1.7.09 Town Hall Dunedin Centre architecture for a What if? second

Dunedin Town Hall (facade to Moray Place) 2

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Demolition by neglect. Townscape precincts.

About which, belated (after parapet failure) “buying of engineering opinion” can make sure historic buildings come down for car parks.

On Friday, Karen Ratten of St Kilda had a letter to the editor published, ‘Why the long delay in demolition?’ (ODT 29.6.12). Ms Ratten is firstly concerned about three car parks being currently unavailable for use outside Brocklebanks Building in King Edward St, South Dunedin. She then asks why the hold up with the building’s demolition?

The question could have been, why is demolition of the listed building required at all (the building has facade protection in the district plan and is located in a listed townscape precinct) – if it’s to create interim on-site parking? Given it was (still is!) possible to tie the building together and restore it, or retain the historic facade and erect a new building behind – thereby removing the public safety issue altogether.

DCC’s Alan Worthington, Resource Consents manager, provides reply including an inference (we’re way past generalities here, Alan) that archaeological authority processes required by New Zealand Historic Places Trust for the building have contributed to delay of demolition. This is not so. He then intimates something more useful, saying: “At the same time there may be other matters the building owner is dealing with.” Bingo. Just maybe, the Brocklebank family trust hasn’t finalised building plans in order to apply for resource consent. Who knew!

The other site…

### ODT Online Sat, 30 Jun 2012
Buildings’ demise imminent
By Debbie Porteous
Scenic Circle Hotel Group director Stuart McLauchlan confirmed a crane that went up behind the N. & E.S. Paterson Ltd and Barron buildings in Rattray St this week would be bringing the partially demolished buildings down within “days”. Two separate sections of the 136-year-old Barron Building collapsed in January 2011; parapets fell on to the roof causing it to collapse inwards onto the second storey.
Read more

The Barron Building, originally known as the Banks, Barron & Co. Building, was designed by architect Henry F. Hardy, and constructed circa 1875. The Victorian-era warehouse later received a very fine interior by architect Owen E. MacFie. The first bottling plant for Speights was housed in the basement (still intact) – potentially, a stunning adjunct to Speight’s Alehouse and heritage tours.

According to specialist engineers the Barron Building could have been saved following collapse of the parapet.

Keeping up a building of this scale is not usually prohibitive, cost wise – it does require diligence. It can ‘come down’ to having motivated owners and investors.

Long before parapet failure, Barron Building required conscientious owner-stewards to carry out cyclical maintenance (seeing to weathertightness, gutter cleaning, keeping pigeons out, removing vegetation and trees from mortar, repointing and so on) and regular structural assessment towards enhancing building performance – with all resulting work to be costed and carried out in stages (at its most affordable – given that for many many years Dunedin City Council has practised leniency towards building owners in regards to bringing buildings up to code).

All the people saying pull the old buildings down because they’re “eyesores” (see ODT news report above) and asking why private building owners should be put to the cost of saving old structures like these – the answer, respectfully, is that they need to get out a bit, to see for themselves what’s actually going on in the neighbourhood.

Building owners (good investors), with vision and means, are set on maintaining, strengthening and upgrading their heritage buildings. Their efforts are attracting higher paying tenants; and incrementally/cumulatively they are raising property values in the old CBD. It’s known as “regeneration”. If you’re a building investor who isn’t participating in this upward movement (where’s your diligence?) and your property is going backwards, you need to ask yourself what’s the sense in being left behind? Get educated. Those caring for heritage building stock are starting to make real money now and for the long term. They’ve done their sums, they know what it takes.

A sizeable cluster of Dunedin’s historic buildings in the area have been or are in the process of being strengthened and re-used. They include (no particular order): Old BNZ Bank, Standard Building, Old National Bank, Bing Harris Building, Clarion Building, Bracken Court (Moray Pl), Queens Garden Court, NMA Building (former Union Steam Ship Co, Water St), former Rogan McIndoe Print Building (Crawford St), 14 Dowling St, Garrison Hall (Dowling St), former Stavely Building (cnr Bond and Jetty Sts), Wood Adams Building (19 Bond St), former Chief Post Office, former Donald Reid Store (Vogel St), Milne Brebner Building (Vogel St), 366 Princes St… and more besides.

Again, WHY are we losing the likes of Barron Building, N. & E.S. Paterson Building, and Brocklebanks Building?

If you are a heritage building owner wanting to access available information that could help you conserve, strengthen and save your building, contact Glen Hazelton, DCC Policy Planner (Heritage) phone 4774000 – or Owen Graham, NZHPT Area Manager (Otago Southland) phone 4779871.

****

### ODT Online Tue, 7 Sep 2010
Measures urged to protect heritage buildings
By John Gibb
Relatively cheap and simple measures can protect many of Dunedin’s heritage buildings from much of the kind of earthquake damage evident in Christchurch, structural engineer Lou Robinson says.
Read more

Related Posts and Comments:
8.5.12 Owners of neglected buildings
25.8.11 180 Rattray St, Dunedin: Proposed historic building demolition…
12.4.11 Public outrage – SHAME on those re$pon$ible for building neglect
4.3.11 Reaction to another instance of unthinking ad-hocism from City Hall
19.2.11 Owner of Dragon Café/Barron Building has lodged an application…
26.1.11 D Scene: Honour heritage
22.1.11 SAVE Dragon Café / Barron Building – Sign the Online Petition
13.1.11 Barron Building and Rattray Street
13.1.11 Banks, Barron & Co Building Collapse pics

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Dunedin: Nominations for heritage re-use awards close next week

Nominations and entries must be received by Tuesday 20 December 2011 at 5pm

* Oakwood Properties Earthquake Strengthening Award
http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/services/dunedin-heritage/earthquake-strengthening-award

* Barlow Justice/NZHPT Heritage Interiors Award
http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/services/dunedin-heritage/interiors-award

* Dunedin Heritage Re-use Award
http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/services/dunedin-heritage/dunedin-heritage-re-use-award

The nomination process is simple – nominate the person(s) you would like to see recognised for their work.

The awards evening will be held in March 2012.

For more information, contact Glen Hazelton
Policy Planner (Heritage), City Planning, Dunedin City Council

50 The Octagon, Dunedin; PO Box 5045, Moray Place, Dunedin 9058
Phone: 03 477 4000; Fax: 03 474 3451
Email: glen.hazelton@dcc.govt.nz; www.dunedin.govt.nz

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Another outrage of trite ill-informed force of change: Maltexo, Ward St

Another horny tale. Yes, the complete failure of a developer to carry out ANY heritage building assessment for the industrial site that would have told him which valuable components to retain on site, for good stewardship of the Dunedin harbourside’s architectural character and integrity.

The developer says he has spoken to architects – he might have. The question is which ones – no architects currently working out of Dunedin have the professional accreditation necessary to offer a heritage assessment or building conservation advice – plenty of the local boys need work.

The Maltexo sign, while iconic, is paint on a simple brick wall of a simple shed (a simple feature to retain and keep maintained in situ if desired); however, it is NOT the most valuable architectural historical component to be retained on site – the frontage of the gabled building immedately south of the sign on Ward St, is.

To a lesser extent, a small number of brick sheds to the rear of the site, in fair to reasonable condition, could have been architecturally integrated into any new industrial complex.

Mr Barnes can file his comments where the sun doesn’t shine.

“Key to the industrial area is revitalising these sites … This is a cornerstone, modern, highly visible site which is what businesses are looking for.” –Chris Barnes, developer

### ODT Online Mon, 25 Apr 2011
$2 million business park by end of the year
By Simon Hartley
A $2 million business park is due to be completed in Dunedin by the end of the year. It will be built on land now occupied by the former Maltexo factory, which is scheduled for demolition. Last November, Dunedin property investor Chris Barnes bought the lessee’s interest in the site, on the corner of Ward and Halsey Sts, with the deal to be closed on completion of demolition; scheduled by June 30.
Read more

Don’t you love a man of largesse. We should be pleased?
Lest we forget, thanks too, to Port Otago Limited and its subsidiary Chalmers Properties’ current property manager.

Related Posts and Comments:
6.2.11 Hurt Inside [photographs]
27.1.11 Good-bye to MALTEXO, Ward Street – Dunedin Harbourside

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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