Tag Archives: Accounting method

Stadium: DVML, DVL miserable losers! #grandtheftdebt

### ch9.co.nz June 20, 2013 – 6:18pm
DVML forecasts small profit
The company that runs Forsyth Barr Stadium has forecast a small surplus for the first time in 2015. DVML has been running at a loss, but forecasts that will change to a $10,000 surplus. But the company that owns the stadium, DVL, has forecast its loss will be about $1 million more than expected, at more than $5 million. DCC chief executive Paul Orders said both were just projections, and the DVL loss was due to tax changes. The forecasts will be considered by the council on Monday.
Ch39 Link [no video available]

SURPRISE
Reports for the Council meeting to be held on Monday 24 June 2013 at 1pm not yet available at the DCC website.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Business, Concerts, DCC, DCHL, DVL, DVML, Economics, Events, Hot air, Media, ORFU, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums, What stadium

Afternoons with Jim Mora: The Panel today [DCC interest rate swaps]

### radionz.co.nz Monday 5 November 2012
Afternoons with Jim Mora
http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/afternoons

The flirtations of our local bodies with money mechanisms on money markets that may be getting ratepayers into schtuck.

16:35 The Panel with Garry Moore and Finlay MacDonald (Part 2)
Topics – Every schoolboy used to know that, at the height of the empire, almost a quarter of the atlas was coloured pink, showing the extent of British rule. An Otago University academic says Dunedin ratepayers should be very concerned about losses on interest and currency swap schemes that appear in the council’s annual report. Millionaire Kim Dotcom would be putting his money where other investors wouldn’t if he goes ahead with plans to relaunch Pacific Fibre, according to Prime Minister John Key. (24′42″)
Audio | Download: Ogg Vorbis MP3 | Embed

16:50 Jim Mora, Dr Robert Hamlin and guests discuss Auckland City Council and Dunedin City Council activities with respect to interest rate swaps (IRS). Together, the councils may have squandered up to $200 million of ratepayer funds. Is a royal commission of inquiry required? In Dunedin City Treasury’s case, interest swap rates and financial derivatives may be being used to ‘assist’ stadium financing, and much more. In the city council annual report the IRS activity goes unexplained, being recorded as (multi-million dollar) losses (see page 146).

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The (NZ) Banking Ombudsman suggests some customers & their advisers don’t understand the product. [IRS and Derivatives]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interest_rate_swap

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### stuff.co.nz Last updated 05:00 04/11/2012
Business
Banks ‘plundering society’ globally
By Rob Stock
Claims banks missold interest-rate swaps to businesses and local authorities have been making headlines around the world. Interest rate swaps are a derivative financial tool used by sophisticated businesses with skilled treasury functions to limit interest rate risk. But it is becoming clear that in places such as Britain, Italy and America, interest-rate swaps were sold by banks to organisations that did not understand the risks they were taking. In case after case, interest rate swaps often sold in 2007 and 2008 as “protection” against interest rates rising sharply have served mainly to protect bank profits by locking businesses and local bodies into high levels of interest ahead of those rates falling.
Read more

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This article is from the May/June 2012 issue of Dollars & Sense magazine.

The Swap Crisis
We have your city. Pay up, or else!
Interest rate swap deals have allowed the big banks to hold local governments and agencies hostage for tens of millions of dollars.
By Darwin BondGraham
In 2002 a little-known but powerful state agency in California and Wall Street titans Morgan Stanley, Citigroup, and Ambac consummated one of the biggest deals to date involving a type of financial derivative called an “interest rate swap.” A year later the executive director of the Bay Area’s Metropolitan Transportation Commission, Steve Heminger, proudly described these historic deals to a visiting contingent of Atlanta policymakers as a model to be emulated. Swaps were opening up a brave new world in public finance by extending the MTC’s purchasing power by $200 million, making a previously impossible bridge construction schedule achievable in a shorter timeframe. The deal would also protect the MTC from future volatile swings in variable interest rates. To top it off, the banks would make a neat little profit too. Everybody was winning.
Then in 2008 it all came crashing down. The financial system’s near collapse, the federal government’s unprecedented bailouts, and global economic stagnation mean that the derivative products once touted as prudent hedges against uncertainty have instead become toxic assets, draining billions from the public sector.
Read more

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Business, DCC, DCHL, DVL, DVML, Economics, Media, Name, People, Politics, Project management, Property, Site, Sport, Stadiums

Stadium: DCC caught in headlights

Blindsided?

The Otago Daily Times (1.11.12) states:
“Dunedin city councillors are pointing fingers after some were blindsided by a $3.2 million loss by the company running Forsyth Barr Stadium. Some councillors spoken to by the Otago Daily Times yesterday admitted they were unaware they had accepted reports detailing the loss at Monday’s council meeting. Other councillors were aware of the reports, but were still yet to read them properly.” ODT Link

Blissfully unaware, or deliberately avoiding and shielding knowledge of the fact, thereby keeping the public and media at arm’s length from the true state of council finances relating to the stadium project?

That is a question for all elected representatives at Dunedin City Council, the council’s chief executive, the executive management team (EMT), and the governance manager.

Sadly, the annual reports don’t tell the full story of the ‘stadium effect’ – that is, the figures that Dunedin renters and ratepayers will be facing, and unable to pay, when the whole system is called to ‘correct’.

Fire away, Dunedin public.

It’s as if the newspaper editor has suffered a blunt contusion. Sees the problem then runs away to John Wilson Ocean Drive (closed from August 2006), and ends weakly, out of steam, with the hope that those in power “will turn their full attention to making our new stadium a profitable investment of which the city can be proud”, and would they please read the annual report[s].

### ODT Online Sat, 3 Nov 2012
Editorial: Council must keep eye on the ball
Just as it seemed the Dunedin City Council was determined to focus on a different attitude towards debt, revelations that a worse-than-expected $3.2 million loss by the company running the Forsyth Barr Stadium was not even discussed at this week’s full council meeting have put it back in the firing line and raised questions about its priorities. The loss – nearly $1 million greater than forecast – was recorded in Dunedin Venues Management Ltd’s (DVML) 2011-12 annual report, which was released a day later to this newspaper. But it had flown under the radar at the council meeting, with no mention of the reports on DVML or Dunedin Venues Ltd (DVL), which owns the stadium, on the meeting’s public agenda, and no indication those reports had been circulated publicly and to media – as required under the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act – ahead of the meeting. The reasons for that are unclear and convoluted.
Read more

From our Northland cuzzies, some clues for rabbit hunting…

Image: NZ Herald

### New Zealand Herald 5:30 AM Saturday Nov 3, 2012
Inside Kaipara’s ratepayers revolt
By Andrew Laxon
Many residents of a small coastal town are refusing to pay for a $58 million debt that has crippled their local council and left them with the bill.
The Mangawhai Ratepayers and Residents Association chairman Bruce Rogan has at least 500 local residents refusing to pay an estimated $1 million in rates this year because the Kaipara District Council secretly ran up an unsustainable $58 million debt building a sewerage treatment scheme for about 2000 people who own homes here.
Read more

Dare we say, Dunedin, the amount currently owed by each city ratepayer well exceeds that owed by the good ratepayers of Mangawhai, on the Kaipara.
So, what now?

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Stadium financials: Calvin Oaten on DVML, DVL and DCHL

### ODT Online Fri, 2 Nov 2012
Opinion
DCHL covering DVL and DVML losses
By Calvin Oaten
Stadium finances dismay, says the headline (ODT, 31.10.12). The story states Dunedin Venues Management Ltd (DVML) as posting a loss of $3.214 million. Mayor Dave Cull says “it is not sustainable”.

But let’s look at the combined performance of DVML and Dunedin Venues Ltd (DVL) and we see a fuller picture. Let’s face it, these two entities are joined at the hip and are no more than an arrangement of convenience, for the dispersion of liabilities attached to the stadium. DVML’s loss at $3.214 million is arrived at after receiving revenue of $6.093 million, offset by expenses of $6.395 million.

It then pays DVL $3.667 million rental for the use of the stadium. This is offset by receiving a (subvention) payment of $782,000 from Aurora. Net loss $3.214 million. But we then need to add the carried forward loss of $3.256 million from the previous period to disclose the consolidated loss at $6.470 million.

Turning now to DVL, we find the declared position is: Revenue $3.672 million, expenses $16.051 million for a loss of $12.379 million. This is offset by a (subvention) payment from Aurora of $7.292 million leaving a loss of $5.087 million.

This is offset by a tax credit of what could be $775,000 for a net loss of $4.312 million To this is added interest rate swap losses (a totally incomprehensible concept) of $8.579 million for a total consolidated loss of $12.891 million.

So combining the two scenarios we have a total consolidated loss attributable to the stadium of $19.361 million. This, Mr Cull, is really what is not sustainable.

Interestingly, nowhere in either set of accounts can one find any evidence of income derived from the much vaunted private funding. Why? Is it because as the PwC report says, it can only be treated as operational revenue, and therefore goes direct to the events promoters such as the ORFU?

Looks like it. They in turn simply pay – or not – a rental to DVML for the use of the stadium by event. This is what is expressed in DVML’s revenue statement. All this raises the question: what happens if DCHL is unable to produce those subvention payments?

It has already served notice that since July 1, 2012, it will no longer borrow to provide payments of $23.2 million to the DCC which consisted of, $10.450 million dividend, $5.25 million capital repayment of stadium debt, and subvention payments to DVL and DVML. As can be seen this amounts to $17.25 million offsetting the already considerable losses incurred.

There is no doubt but that the stadium will figure very largely in the city’s future funding difficulties, which are so manifest.
ODT Link

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Stadium financials: JimmyJones v Peter Hutchison (DVML) on accounting method

### ODT Online Wed, 31 Oct 2012
Stadium finances dismay
By Chris Morris
Dunedin Mayor Dave Cull says the Forsyth Barr Stadium’s finances are “not sustainable”, after confirmation the company running the venue lost nearly $1 million more than expected in its first year of operation. The result was contained in Dunedin Venues Management Ltd’s 2011-12 annual report, released to the Otago Daily Times yesterday, which showed the company lost $3.2 million in its first year. […]A copy of Dunedin Venues Ltd’s annual report was also released yesterday, and showed the company that owned the stadium – and received rent from DVML – recorded a $4.312 million loss for the same period.
Mr Hutchison cautioned against adding the two losses together, as they overlapped, and because DVL’s results were largely accounting losses – not cash – and expected. “It [DVL] is behaving exactly as it should do.”
Read more

More ‘fallout’ stories at the Otago Daily Times:
● Wed, 31 Oct 2012 – Report about stadium loss slips under radar
● Thu, 1 Nov 2012 – Councillors blindsided by DVML results
● Thu, 1 Nov 2012 – Stadium loss rates fears
● Fri, 2 Nov 2012 – Stadium rate ‘tax on being busy’

The following comments appear at ODT Online, in reply:

DVL loss not as expected
Submitted by JimmyJones on Thu, 01/11/2012 – 2:56pm.

DVL and DVML director Peter Hutchison says that the size of DVML’s $4.3 million loss was as expected. This statement does not match with the official forecast in DVL’s Statement of Intent which predicted that the year’s result for 2012 would be $6.5 million (before the ratepayer subsidy). This latest result is a loss of $11.6 million (before ratepayer subsidy) – so this is much worse than expected.
The loss of $11.6 million is much bigger than the official $4.3 million loss because this doesn’t include the $7.3 million DCC subsidy. It is wrong to exclude the DCC subsidy when considering the overall effect on the finances of the DCC and the ratepayers. Both DVL and DVML are paid a subsidy that doesn’t show-up in their net profit/loss figures.

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Stadium losses add up
Submitted by JimmyJones on Thu, 01/11/2012 – 11:47pm.

Mr Hutchison, the director of the stadium owning company DVL, says that the losses of DVL and DVML can’t be added together because they overlap. This is misleading and seems to go against the basic principles of accounting. Each of the companies is a separate entity and they have separately audited accounts. To say that the losses overlap is to claim that one or both full year results are wrongly stated. As a director, Peter Hutchison did however vote that these accounts were true and correct; Their auditor has agreed with this. There is no overlap, and they can be added together.

Adding the two losses gives $3.2m + $4.3m = $7.5 million. The real loss is, however, a lot more than $7.5 million because this figure does not include a number of disclosed and undisclosed subsidies, paid either directly or indirectly by Dunedin’s renters and ratepayers. The DCC has so far actively avoided providing the total of all the ongoing losses and costs of their stadium.

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Big, real, ugly, stadium loss
Submitted by JimmyJones on Thu, 01/11/2012 – 11:57pm.

Mr Hutchison says that “DVL’s results were largely accounting losses – not cash – and expected”. In saying this he is implying that the year’s loss is mostly not a real loss. Our accounting system has evolved over a few thousand years to provide the most “real” measure of profit/loss. This is about the best we can do, and that means that both cash and non-cash items are included. If Mr Hutchison thinks he has a better way, he should write a book about it, but in the mean time he needs to stick to the standard NZIFRS method. His statement is in fact wrong, because most of DVL’s expenses are actually cash expenses and because the loss is a real, authentic, auditor certified loss. DVL’s finances are a sensitive area for the DCC, and Mr Hutchison should not be seen to be promoting any particular viewpoint.

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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