Category Archives: Police

Moron Drivers stay off Otago Southland roads….

….this long Easter Weekend.

[ends]

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The warm fuzzy more genial (guinea pig?!) message:

At Facebook:

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At Facebook:

Fri, 14 Apr 2017
ODT: On the buses over Easter weekend
Heritage buses will be back on the road over Easter weekend, providing public transport over the public holiday. Otago Heritage Bus Society treasurer/secretary Jacqui Hellyer said Dunedinites could ride the buses, which serviced St Kilda, St Clair, the Octagon, Brockville, Halfway Bush and Normanby, for a gold coin donation on Good Friday and Easter Sunday.
The services would run hourly and the timetable would be available on the Otago Heritage Bus Society’s Facebook page, Ms Hellyer said. Passengers could take service dogs or pet dogs on a leash.
The St Kilda service had stayed like its former route – to Brockville then Halfway Bush – and the other services took the routes used on non-public holidays, she said.

The Otago Regional Council, in a statement published on its website, said there would be no bus services on Good Friday or Easter Sunday. However, the standard Saturday timetable would apply on Saturday, and Easter Monday would run on the public holiday timetable. Normal services would resume on Tuesday.

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Cool image at Twitter:

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the NZ public and foreign interest.

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Filed under Democracy, Education, Geography, Health & Safety, Hospital, New Zealand, NZFS, People, Police, Public interest, Tourism, Transportation, Travesty

Ihaka Stokes case #Christchurch #NZ

A B U S E D ● M U R D E R E D

Toddler Ihaka Stokes was 14-months old when he died after suffering 59 injuries in the days leading up to his death on July 3, 2015

File photo [via Newshub]

30/03/2017
Newshub: Jury retires to make decision on Christchurch toddler murder trial
The jury in the trial of Troy Taylor, who is accused of murdering toddler Ihaka Stokes, has retired to consider their decision …. Taylor pleaded not guilty to assaulting Ihaka on July 2, 2015 and not guilty to the toddler’s murder. Throughout his trial in the High Court at Christchurch he has continued to plead his innocence. Ihaka’s mother, Mikala, was the only other person who was in the house that night, and the defence argues it was she who inflicted the fatal blows. Cont/

At Facebook:

Stuff News includes video segments:

Murder-accused Troy Taylor says his ‘conscience kicked in’ too late to save Ihaka Stokes’ life
Last updated 17:38, March 28 2017

Troy Taylor found guilty of murdering 14-month-old Ihaka Stokes
Last updated 18:45, March 30 2017

Father of murdered toddler Ihaka Stokes ‘pretty happy’ at Troy Taylor guilty verdict
Last updated 22:13, March 30 2017

Blood on the wall: How toddler murderer Troy Taylor tried to pretend he hadn’t killed Ihaka Stokes
Last updated 16:44, March 31 2017

Lead detective had ‘terrible dreams’ during Ihaka Stokes murder investigation
Last updated 19:37, March 31 2017

Mikala Stokes seemed younger than her 21 years in the witness stand.
Photo: Iain McGregor/Faifax NZ

Ihaka’s mother Mikala Stokes leaves the High Court at Christchurch.
Photo: Iain McGregor/Fairfax NZ

Ihaka Stokes’ mother posted pictures on him online.

Fri, 31 Mar 2017
ODT: Mum goes clubbing after court
The mother of murdered Christchurch infant Ihaka Stokes went nightclubbing last night just hours after her ex-partner was found guilty of the boy’s brutal killing. Mikala Stokes (21) posted a photo on social media in the early hours of this morning. The selfie caption read: “From court to club”. Earlier in the evening, after Troy Taylor, the man who blamed her for killing her 14-month-old son at their Christchurch home in July 2015, was found guilty, Stokes posted photographs of her playing beer pong. One of Stokes’ friends on Snapchat, Julie Stechmann, screen-grabbed the nightclub photo, which was posted at about 1am. She told the Herald today that she thought it was strange behaviour. Cont/

At Twitter:

Cameron Ellen, right, carries his son Ihaka Stokes’s coffin at his funeral in 2015. The 14-month-old was murdered by Troy Taylor (in purple, centre), the then partner of his mother Mikala Stokes (obscured, behind Ellen).
Photo: John Kirk-Anderson/Fairfax NZ

Mikala Stokes and Troy Taylor together at Ihaka’s funeral.
Photo: Fairfax NZ

At Twitter:

Related Posts and Comments:
28.3.17 New Zealand child abuse
20.12.15 NZ Police family violence campaign #WalkAway
25.8.15 State Care: history of brutal child abuse #NewZealand

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

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Filed under Crime, Media, Name, New Zealand, People, Police, Politics, Public interest, Travesty

Who needs cheap-brained tourists —ugh #Dunedin

I tried taking the usual bad ‘visitor’ happysnaps

but seriously (no tourists were shoved aside to take these)

Destination Dunedin managing the trade-offs between risk and innovation….

*Enterprise Dunedin, hope you’ve got a section or three about that in your destination plan

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On Monday I was quickly(!) photographing post-iD architectural details inside Dunedin Railway Station – it was absolutely no more than 3 minutes by smartphone – when an Asian tourist abruptly told me to get out of the way so her male partner could get a shot. Moi ? I was there first, just walking and clicking – there was no crowd – the visitor arrogance was slightly disgusting.

It could happen anywhere. People sheeple.

The following at ODT, however, is much much worse.
Quite frankly the residents of Baldwin St should seek police and legal action.
It’s YOUR homes, YOUR property, YOUR privacy that’s being abused.
The council can help. The ED can help.

[A steep street of No Trespass notices and snarling bullmastiffs has its own photographic charm.]

Good on Sharon Hyndman for speaking out.
I wouldn’t be in her shoes, for all ‘the world’.

At Facebook:

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### ODT Online Wed, 29 Mar 2017
Privacy breaches upset resident
By David Loughrey
A sharp rise in visitor numbers to the world’s steepest street has resulted in one Dunedin resident speaking out about tourists she says are walking on to her property and peering in the windows. Baldwin St resident of 17 years Sharon Hyndman took her cause to a Dunedin City Council public forum yesterday. She said some tourists had “issues with the concept of privacy and private property”. That meant she had people walking down her drive, on to her deck, and peering in her windows, once or twice a week …. Others parked in her driveway, and did “not always co-operate” when asked to leave. One man had even entered her property and stood on an outdoor table to take a photograph.
Read more

Related Post:
6.1.17 OPINIONS : Otago Southland regional tourism

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

*Image: pinimg.com – bullmastiff tweaked by whatifdunedin

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New Zealand child abuse

At Twitter:

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New Zealanders are more likely to be homicide victims in their first tender years than at any other time in their lives.

### NZ Herald 5:00 AM Tue, 28 Mar 2017
Jarrod Gilbert: We really must stop this cycle of child abuse
By Dr Jarrod Gilbert
Often when I’m doing research I dance a silly jig when I gleefully unearth a gem of information hitherto unknown or long forgotten. In studying the violent deaths of kids that doesn’t happen. There was no dance of joy when I discovered New Zealanders are more likely to be homicide victims in their first tender years than at any other time in their lives. But nothing numbs you like the photographs of dead children. Little bodies lying there limp with little hands and little fingers, covered in scratches and an array of bruises some dark black and some fading, looking as vulnerable dead as they were when they were alive. James Whakaruru’s misery ended when he was killed in 1999. He had endured four years of life and that was all he could take. He was hit with a small hammer, a jug cord and a vacuum cleaner hose. During one beating his mind was so confused he stared blankly ahead. His tormentor responded by poking him in the eyes. It was a stomping that eventually switched out his little light. It was a case that even the Mongrel Mob condemned, calling the cruelty “amongst the lowest of any act”.
Read more

• Dr Jarrod Gilbert is a sociologist at the University of Canterbury and the lead researcher at Independent Research Solutions. He is the author of Patched: The history of gangs in New Zealand and is currently writing a book on murder.

Related Post and Comments:
20.12.15 NZ Police family violence campaign #WalkAway

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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Video from America : Street protest —Washington DC #inauguration

Footage direct from a reader on site today….

protest-wdc-nzt-19jan2017-1

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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Basic questions arising for the City, unpublished by the newspaper

Received from John Evans
Tue, 17 Jan 2017 at 7:47 p.m.

From: John Evans
Date: Monday, January 16, 2017
Subject: KPI
To: ODT editor

The Editor, ODT

Sir,

We are often regaled by company directors, CEOs and bureaucrats with discourses on the importance of KPIs. KPIs?

Key Performance Indicators – one of many PR corporate speak Buzzwords.

Wikipedia’s definition is pretty broad but basically it means that certain measures designed by the company or board are measured against actual performances.

Recently, the term gained another meaning when KEY performance [was] reassessed in the light of John KEY’s resignation. Unfortunately his stellar career as Prime Minister seemed to be judged poorly by those political pundits doing the assessment.

The key word is Performance, the measure of which is judged in order to provide an increase in salary or measures which might lose the judged their position if they failed to meet the KPIs included as part of the employment contract.

The test is what performance is paramount and who is it paramount to.
These tests are important in worldwide businesses but is there a different reality in New Zealand? It seems to me that either the KPIs are set incorrectly or there is a disconnect because no one seems to fail, to not meet their predetermined KPIs.

[infront.com]

One example is the role of council lawyers. Why would council lawyers write in an employment contract a clause which gave the employee a golden parachute even if they failed to meet their KPIs? Or was it the employees themselves who wrote the KPIs for their own future benefit? Surely if this was so, the lawyers acting for the company or body they represent would refuse to condone the parachute for employees and directors after proven incompetence.

The Dunedin City Council and its management, and the council owned companies, are surely charged with KPIs and, one surmises, about the results of such indicators and the resultant effects on the council and its employees. Can we analyse a few actions of the council and what the KPIs may have been and whether they would meet them and perhaps the consequences of meeting them or not.

The first and most obvious one is the theft of 152+ cars.
What was the measure of acceptable theft? Was it 20 cars, 100 cars or was 150 cars sufficient to tip them over the edge. And as another example, what was the Police’s key indicator on this matter? Do they prosecute for the theft or conversion of 1 car or does it take 160 cars to prosecute somebody for being involved either in the theft or knowing receipt of a car or cars?

The next is the investment in land and development projects by Delta.
Was failure in one, two or three such projects acceptable or is the magic number 5 (Delta will do it again and we have not quite got there yet).

The Dunedin stadium KPIs. Is a running cost of some $20million acceptable as an annual loss to the ratepayers or should the losses be only $15million or shock horror only $5million. Or should the ratepayers be released from the financial burden which was never the choice of the majority?

Sewage Treatment KPI – Is it acceptable to process sewage to a point that it pollutes the ocean two kilometres out or are we entitled to potable water ex site at Tahuna?

Mudtank cleaning KPI – How many mudtanks cleaned would be an acceptable result, would a flood in South Dunedin suggest that measure was incorrect? Contractual performance and payment for same. Would a KPI for the DCC CEO include overall managing payments to contractors? If a contractor did not perform to those KPIs set within the mudtank cleaning contract, should the contractor be still paid?

Wastewater treatment – Is it an acceptable KPI for wastewater treatment that in high rainfall such overflows are discharged into the pristine Otago Harbour?

Delta KPI on pole replacement. Is 100 unreplaced tagged poles acceptable? Is 1000 acceptable? On suspect poles, is a KPI that the company changes so that they did not breach a previous KPI acceptable or should every company and council just change their KPIs to avoid failure, blame or the legal consequences?

Richard Healey, the “whistleblower” on Delta’s failures seems to have personal ‘built-in’ KPIs —including integrity, high quality job performance, peer safety and corporate responsibility. Just why do the CEO and directors’ KPIs apparently differ from these such that Healey has to resign for them to take note?

On Directors of the council owned companies, do their KPIs reflect their responsibility under the law or are they designed to protect the directors from prosecution under the law despite failure by other measures?

And where does the buck stop?

Just what are the KPIs upon which we judge the mayor, based? Is the only measurement his electability?

Are we the ratepayers not entitled to expect a KPI that includes retribution against failings in any DCC departments or DCHL companies? If we do not reward success and prosecute failure in some way are we not missing the whole point of Pavlov and his dogs? Should we not then close our prisons and let the perpetrators of violence, antisocial acts and any injustice roam free, surely this is the logical nett result of such an attitude of no judgement.

The analysis of John Key’s contribution would suggest that electability and performance may well be poles apart. Perhaps that is the greatest lesson we can learn from the errors of judgement of recent times in our city.

John P. Evans
Otakou

[ends]

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

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Michael Lewis : The Undoing Project —Interview with Kathryn Ryan #RNZ

Link received 27/12/2016 at 3:21 p.m.
Message: A lesson for some Dunedin ‘luminaries’ perchance?

michael-lewis-tabitha-soren-w-w-norton-company-bw-by-whatifdunedin

It’s amazing how resistant, particularly powerful men, are to people coming from outside and giving them advice on how to make decisions.
Michael Lewis

RNZ National
Trust your gut? Think again
From Nine To Noon with Kathryn Ryan, 10:09 am on 21 December 2016

[Abridged.] Michael Lewis is one of the most famous non-fiction writers in America. He has written 14 books, edited one and is a regular contributor to Vanity Fair. His books include the global best-selling Flash Boys – an expose of high speed scamming in the stock market; The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine – an account of shady financial transactions and accounting that led to the 2008 global financial meltdown and on which the film The Big Short was based and Moneyball, the story of a maverick outsider who beat the system.

Lewis’s new book is called The Undoing Project in which he profiles the professional and personal relationship between the behavioural psychologists Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky. Kahneman and Tversky’s work shed new light on how humans make decisions when faced with risk and uncertainty. They established that we generally trust our gut instinct, over the evidence, to guide our decision-making.

michael-lewis-the-undoing-project-cover-image-simonandschuster-com[simonandschuster.com]

Lewis says he came across Kahneman and Tversky after writing Moneyball. He says the two were very different personalities and that made for the perfect team.

“They sensed in the other something they wished they had. Kahneman is an unbelievable creative mind he really has a mind more like a poet or a novelist filled with these flashing insights about human nature. Tversky wanted to be a poet but he has a scientific, logical mind. He’s a brilliant logician.”

The two decide to come together and study how the human mind works. That work became an examination of human fallibility – the weakness of the human mind. They designed experiments to show how our mind plays tricks on us.

One they stumbled on was a phenomenon they called anchoring that skews human decisions. They also established that we are terrible at assessing risk – we rate risk based on what’s most memorable which tends to be what happened most recently.

michael-lewis-advice-from-experts-marketwatch-com[marketwatch.com]

“People long for the world to be a far more certain place than it is, instead of dealing with uncertainties they tell stories that make it seem much more certain and respond to stories that make it seem much more certain than it is. A politician speaking in certain terms as if he’s infallible has weirdly an advantage – even though we shouldn’t believe him. We’re very vulnerable to people who simulate certainty.”

Lewis is unsure whether this inbuilt fallibility can be fixed.

“I hate to sound fatalistic but one of the big takeaways from [Kahneman and Tversky’s] work is just how hard it is to correct for human fallibility – they equate cognitive illusion with optical illusion.”
Read more

Audio | Download: Ogg MP3 (26′07″)

Michael Monroe Lewis (born Oct 15, 1960) was born in New Orleans to corporate lawyer J. Thomas Lewis and community activist Diana Monroe Lewis. He attended the college preparatory Isidore Newman School in New Orleans. He then attended Princeton University where he received a BA degree (cum laude) in Art History in 1982 and was a member of the Ivy Club. He went on to work with New York art dealer Daniel Wildenstein. He enrolled in the London School of Economics, and received his MA degree in Economics in 1985. Lewis was hired by Salomon Brothers and moved to New York for their training program. He worked at its London office as a bond salesman. He resigned to write Liar’s Poker and become a financial journalist. A contributing editor to Vanity Fair since 2009. More at Wikipedia.

Vanity Fair – Hive: Politics
Donald Trump and the Rules of the New American Board Game
By Michael Lewis Dec 18, 2016 7:00 pm
While volunteering at his daughter’s new high school, Michael Lewis watched kids of all races and backgrounds react to Trump’s election with a peaceful demonstration of their grief and fear. It inspired a game he’s devised for thinking about the future. Link

Vanity Fair – Hive: Politics
Obama’s Way
By Michael Lewis Sep 11, 2012 6:12 pm
To understand how air-force navigator Tyler Stark ended up in a thornbush in the Libyan desert in March 2011, one must understand what it’s like to be president of the United States—and this president in particular. Hanging around Barack Obama for six months, in the White House, aboard Air Force One, and on the basketball court, Michael Lewis learns the reality of the Nobel Peace Prize winner who sent Stark into combat. Link

Posted by Elizabeth Kerr

This post is offered in the public interest.

*Image: Michael Lewis by Tabitha Soren / W.W. Norton Company
blackwhite by whatifdunedin

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